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News Bobby Mouse needs his cut.. (Price Increase)

nesboy43

Well-Known Member
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For me I can afford it, but the value just isn't quite there (Premier Pass) and I don't plan on visiting the parks more to make up for the increased cost. I am going to stick to tickets and go 1-3 times a year. The breakeven point would require so much time that it would not be worth the effort.

From my perspective I think an upper-middle class family that can afford any of these passes won't have enough free time to get the value out of it.

Also, does anyone else think the SoCal Select days are going to be packed, especially after Star Wars Land opens? I can't believe that pass has remained so cheap.
 
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1LE McQueen

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
For me I can afford it, but the value just isn't quite there (Premier Pass) and I don't plan on visiting the parks more to make up for the increased cost. I am going to stick to tickets and go 1-3 times a year. The breakeven point would require so much time that it would not be worth the effort.

Also, does anyone else think the SoCal Select days are going to be packed, especially after Star Wars Land opens? I can't believe that pass has remained so cheap.
My mind is blown away at the cost of the Premier Pass, yet Disney won't allow monthly payments for it. Oh well I guess.

They're beginning to price me out, which i'm indifferent about; the true insult is the IP implementation, IMHO. So i'm paying more to be advertised on Marvel / Frozen / Star Wars / Pixar, regardless of thematic integrity or creativity, all of which is NOT the reason why I love Disneyland. Because, you know, it's better than a non-descript coaster somewhere, that maybe is like India or somethin hur dur.

Can't help but feel Disney is taking notes from Electronic Arts.
 

Phrubruh

Well-Known Member
My mind is blown away at the cost of the Premier Pass, yet Disney won't allow monthly payments for it. Oh well I guess.
So no monthly payments on Premier Pass? Sounds fantastic. Now they need to extend that to the both Signature passes. I also think they need to raise max pass daily to $50. At $15 it is still too cheap. Then get rid of paper fastpass entirely.

I can still afford the signature passes but I'm never going to pay for one until crowd levels are much lower. I'd rather put that money towards Europe or Asia trip or finish paying off my house. (it should be done in the next couple of years if I accelerate the payments. So close.)

There are too many things in the world to see and do. Anything Disney related is pretty low on my list right now.
 

1LE McQueen

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
So no monthly payments on Premier Pass? Sounds fantastic. Now they need to extend that to the both Signature passes. I also think they need to raise max pass daily to $50. At $15 it is still too cheap. Then get rid of paper fastpass entirely.

I can still afford the signature passes but I'm never going to pay for one until crowd levels are much lower. I'd rather put that money towards Europe or Asia trip or finish paying off my house. (it should be done in the next couple of years if I accelerate the payments. So close.)

There are too many things in the world to see and do. Anything Disney related is pretty low on my list right now.
Last time I asked, a few months ago, I was informed that we could do monthly payments on the Deluxe pass then upgrade and pay the difference upfront for Premier, but we still can't do premier itself on a payment plan.

Price increase apologists have the worst arguments ;)
 

Ismael Flores

Well-Known Member
FYI, if your pass is up for renewal soon and you havent done it, you still have a chance to renew at same price. A couple people at work found out about the price hike and called this morning and still got the price without the hike.
 
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Phrubruh

Well-Known Member
Last time I asked, a few months ago, I was informed that we could do monthly payments on the Deluxe pass then upgrade and pay the difference upfront for Premier, but we still can't do premier itself on a payment plan.

Price increase apologists have the worst arguments ;)
Interesting their pricing computers will let you do that. Your just making a larger down payment. You would need to pay $1150 up front and prorate the rest. The question is, who would do that? I would just pay cash for the entire thing. I guess if someone is that broke they need to finance $799 after paying $1150 maybe shouldn't have the pass in the first place.
 

1LE McQueen

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Interesting their pricing computers will let you do that. Your just making a larger down payment. You would need to pay $1150 up front and prorate the rest. The question is, who would do that? I would just pay cash for the entire thing. I guess if someone is that broke they need to finance $799 after paying $1150 maybe shouldn't have the pass in the first place.
Yeah exactly. So if someone wanted to pay for a Premier monthly, the best bet would be to get the most expensive annual pass, make monthly payments on those, and upgrade to Premier paying the difference up front.

For someone like me, who was considering the Premier at the previous price, it would've made sense. Say we're going to Florida (which we are) at the end of this month; we already paid for the 5 day park hopper for both of us. So we could've used that towards the most expensive annual pass for WDW, then scheduled to pay the rest using a monthly payment plan. Whenever we were to go to CA next, we could pay for the Premier upfront and it might've made more sense so we could go to DL once more and WDW once more.

I know, I was confused myself typing that up lol. We were on the fence but Disney thankfully (albeit ironically) made the decision for us with that semi-hefty increase.
 

1LE McQueen

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Is Disneyland Repeating Apple's Mistake?

https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/disneyland-repeating-apple-apos-mistake-170000203.html

It will cost you a lot more the next time you want to visit Disney's(NYSE: DIS) original theme park resort. Disneyland raised its prices on Sunday, and this isn't just a token inflation-adjusted nudge higher. One-day ticket prices are now 7.2% to 10.4% higher, depending on the travel season. A single day at Disneyland or the adjacent California Adventure park will now set a visitor back between $104 and $149.

Annual passes are getting 8% to 10% more expensive, with the high-tier Premier Pass that offers no blackout restrictions for Disneyland and Disney World admissions soaring a mind-numbing 23%, to $1,949 per person. Even higher-percentage gains are kicking in for other amenities, including parking and Disneyland's MaxPass digital ride-reservation service, which are moving 25% and 50% higher, respectively.

Disney's theme parks segment had a record showing in fiscal 2018, so one can argue that Disneyland has the pricing elasticity to keep boosting admission fees. But didn't Apple (NASDAQ: AAPL) think the same thing with its new iPhones late last year? The sticker shock was too much for smartphone shoppers, and iPhone sales have fallen over the past year. Disney could be the next iconic company to price its way out of growth.


At these prices, could he be the only guy left at Disneyland? Image source: Disney.
It's a maul world after all
There may seem to be a method to Disney's madness. The highly anticipated Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge -- the 14-acre expansion themed to the media giant's most potent theatrical franchise -- opens this summer. Disneyland tends to push through annual price increases, so why wouldn't it kick in with a historic hike ahead of its biggest addition in two decades?

The problem here is that Disneyland rolled out an unusually steep increase last year. One-day tickets rose as much as 9% last February, with annual prices getting a boost as large as 18%. We're talking about one-day ticket prices going up nearly 20% over the past 12 months, with annual-pass prices moving substantially higher.
An obvious response here is that Disney is just pushing through what the market will bear. Disneyland is still routinely slammed with visitors, particularly on weekends and in peak travel seasons. Disney's shift to demand-based tiered pricing three years ago hasn't helped spread out the crowds, despite reserving the largest increases for admission during the busiest times of the year.
The rub here is that there is no experience that has complete pricing elasticity. Folks used to think that Apple could keep slapping higher price tags on updated iPhones, sentiment that made the tech bellwether the world's most valuable company by market cap until just a couple of months ago.
It's a whole new world now. Apple stock has plummeted 36% since peaking three months ago, surrendering its trillion-dollar market cap. The latest dagger came last week when the class act of Cupertino warned that revenue declined during the seasonally potent holiday quarter.
The latest iPhones cost as much as $1,449 for the XS Max with the largest storage capacity. Apple and wireless carriers are now scrambling for promotional offers to make the new smartphones more accessible.
There are other factors at play with Apple. Carriers have been weaning customers off wireless-provider subsidies that used to shave hundreds of dollars off new devices in exchange for two-year contracts. Apple is also facing some stiff headwinds in Asia, where rival smartphones are available for considerably less with some pretty nifty features. Disney isn't facing those kinds of hurdles, but its business model makes it more susceptible than Apple in a slowdown.
When sales go soft, Apple can just curb production. Disney's theme parks don't have the same kind of variable cost structure. The number of resort hotel rooms and park attractions are fixed. The only levers Disneyland can use when business goes soft is to offer markdowns to drum up traffic, or trim back operating hours to save on labor, and both routes ultimately devalue the experience for guests.
Apple is learning the hard way that it can't keep raising prices forever, and you're highly unlikely to see an increase when the next wave of iPhones hits the market later this year. Disneyland could be in for a rude awakening if there's a little more elbow room at its California parks now, unless Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge truly raises the bar in the experience that a theme park can offer.
 

mickEblu

Well-Known Member
Is Disneyland Repeating Apple's Mistake?

https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/disneyland-repeating-apple-apos-mistake-170000203.html

It will cost you a lot more the next time you want to visit Disney's(NYSE: DIS) original theme park resort. Disneyland raised its prices on Sunday, and this isn't just a token inflation-adjusted nudge higher. One-day ticket prices are now 7.2% to 10.4% higher, depending on the travel season. A single day at Disneyland or the adjacent California Adventure park will now set a visitor back between $104 and $149.

Annual passes are getting 8% to 10% more expensive, with the high-tier Premier Pass that offers no blackout restrictions for Disneyland and Disney World admissions soaring a mind-numbing 23%, to $1,949 per person. Even higher-percentage gains are kicking in for other amenities, including parking and Disneyland's MaxPass digital ride-reservation service, which are moving 25% and 50% higher, respectively.

Disney's theme parks segment had a record showing in fiscal 2018, so one can argue that Disneyland has the pricing elasticity to keep boosting admission fees. But didn't Apple (NASDAQ: AAPL) think the same thing with its new iPhones late last year? The sticker shock was too much for smartphone shoppers, and iPhone sales have fallen over the past year. Disney could be the next iconic company to price its way out of growth.


At these prices, could he be the only guy left at Disneyland? Image source: Disney.
It's a maul world after all
There may seem to be a method to Disney's madness. The highly anticipated Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge -- the 14-acre expansion themed to the media giant's most potent theatrical franchise -- opens this summer. Disneyland tends to push through annual price increases, so why wouldn't it kick in with a historic hike ahead of its biggest addition in two decades?

The problem here is that Disneyland rolled out an unusually steep increase last year. One-day tickets rose as much as 9% last February, with annual prices getting a boost as large as 18%. We're talking about one-day ticket prices going up nearly 20% over the past 12 months, with annual-pass prices moving substantially higher.
An obvious response here is that Disney is just pushing through what the market will bear. Disneyland is still routinely slammed with visitors, particularly on weekends and in peak travel seasons. Disney's shift to demand-based tiered pricing three years ago hasn't helped spread out the crowds, despite reserving the largest increases for admission during the busiest times of the year.
The rub here is that there is no experience that has complete pricing elasticity. Folks used to think that Apple could keep slapping higher price tags on updated iPhones, sentiment that made the tech bellwether the world's most valuable company by market cap until just a couple of months ago.
It's a whole new world now. Apple stock has plummeted 36% since peaking three months ago, surrendering its trillion-dollar market cap. The latest dagger came last week when the class act of Cupertino warned that revenue declined during the seasonally potent holiday quarter.
The latest iPhones cost as much as $1,449 for the XS Max with the largest storage capacity. Apple and wireless carriers are now scrambling for promotional offers to make the new smartphones more accessible.
There are other factors at play with Apple. Carriers have been weaning customers off wireless-provider subsidies that used to shave hundreds of dollars off new devices in exchange for two-year contracts. Apple is also facing some stiff headwinds in Asia, where rival smartphones are available for considerably less with some pretty nifty features. Disney isn't facing those kinds of hurdles, but its business model makes it more susceptible than Apple in a slowdown.
When sales go soft, Apple can just curb production. Disney's theme parks don't have the same kind of variable cost structure. The number of resort hotel rooms and park attractions are fixed. The only levers Disneyland can use when business goes soft is to offer markdowns to drum up traffic, or trim back operating hours to save on labor, and both routes ultimately devalue the experience for guests.
Apple is learning the hard way that it can't keep raising prices forever, and you're highly unlikely to see an increase when the next wave of iPhones hits the market later this year. Disneyland could be in for a rude awakening if there's a little more elbow room at its California parks now, unless Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge truly raises the bar in the experience that a theme park can offer.
It’s obvious that many of us are hooked. But there comes a point when the experience isn’t worth the price. So they can justify the price increases because of SWL but it’s the same thing that will most likely make the overall experience of the parks worse for many guests.
 
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freebird72

Active Member
I used to use the rule of thumb that 3 trips with 3 day park hoppers was the break even for a Signature Pass (max pass figured into all of that). The difference was about $6. Restaurant and merchandise discounts were gravy. That held true until this price increase--now 3 trips with 3 day adult park hopper tickets is $139 less than a Signature pass (max pass included).

I keep a spreadsheet to compare pricing based on plans made to visit Disney Parks. I upgraded to a Premier passport in November. Given the trips my family planned for 2019, that upgrade made good sense--it was over $300 less expensive to buy the pass versus regular park tickets for the various trips and durations. Comparing the same scenarios we planned at the new pricing, however, the savings is only $2 for the pass versus regular tickets. So renewal at the end of the year becomes a tougher question.
 

nesboy43

Well-Known Member
Is Disneyland Repeating Apple's Mistake?
Disney will be fine. More people may just use tickets than passes and will visit less frequently.

I think the thing Disney is losing here are a number of Signature / Signature Plus / Premier APs. They are the ones hit the hardest by this. The ticket sales and other pass prices are marginal increases.
 

nesboy43

Well-Known Member
Doing some basic math here, if someone only visits on Saturdays:

1 Day Cost Peak: $149
1 Day Cost Regular: $129
Average: $139
Parking: $25
---------------
Daily Cost: $164

Signature
Cost: $1149
Break Even = 7 Visits

Signature (w/MaxPass)
Cost: $1249
Break Even = 8 Visits

Signature Plus
Cost: $1399
Break Even = 9 Visits

So if someone goes on Saturdays and plans on visiting one more time than the break even number for their pass, they would be better off buying a pass than tickets.

Personally I'd rather just visit 2 or 3 times a year at this point.
 
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1LE McQueen

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Doing some basic math here, if someone only visits on Saturdays:

1 Day Cost Peak: $149
1 Day Cost Regular: $129
Average: $139
Parking: $25
---------------
Daily Cost: $164

Signature
Cost: $1149
Break Even = 7 Visits

Signature (w/MaxPass)
Cost: $1249
Break Even = 8 Visits

Signature Plus
Cost: $1399
Break Even = 9 Visits

So if someone goes on Saturdays and plans on visiting one more time than the break even number for their pass, they would be better off buying a pass than tickets.
Awesome!

Although not directly tied-in with park admission and the equation to break even in that aspect, i'd also like to consider the costs of hotel / food / merchandising / family. The more days Disney tacks on for us to break even, the more opportunity they have to cash in on all the other charges we're likely to accumulate.
 

Phrubruh

Well-Known Member
Of course if it's packed every time you go, it really starts to wear on your nerves. You might not be able to stand that many trips to the park. There comes a time when you have to ask yourself why am I fighting all these people to ride something I've done many times before? The food is expensive and the merch is expensive and cheaply made. Could $1500 be used for something more relaxing or even retirement savings?
 

Phrubruh

Well-Known Member
Disney and Apple have similar cults of people. There are people that will buy anything from these companies no matter how poorly they are treated. Apple has been known for not honoring warranties and taking quality control short cuts while Disney has been known to build substandard attractions and over pack the parks to determent of the guest experience. People still give them boat loads of money. I guess the bigger the company the more they can abuse the customer and get away with it.
 

nesboy43

Well-Known Member
Disney and Apple have similar cults of people. There are people that will buy anything from these companies no matter how poorly they are treated. Apple has been known for not honoring warranties and taking quality control short cuts while Disney has been known to build substandard attractions and over pack the parks to determent of the guest experience. People still give them boat loads of money. I guess the bigger the company the more they can abuse the customer and get away with it.
Disney just has a full experience. For me it is as much about the sounds, sights, and food as it is the rides.
 

1LE McQueen

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Disney and Apple have similar cults of people. There are people that will buy anything from these companies no matter how poorly they are treated. Apple has been known for not honoring warranties and taking quality control short cuts while Disney has been known to build substandard attractions and over pack the parks to determent of the guest experience. People still give them boat loads of money. I guess the bigger the company the more they can abuse the customer and get away with it.
So true. Electronic Arts has taken that sort of stance, although worse, and it's finally catching up to them to the tune of millions upon millions of lost capital / sales. It did take years for people to realize the company's Bullhunky. I like to think that this is what happens when corporate puts agendas & the almighty dollar over quality and creativity, originality (SWL excluded but it still carries a major IP).

I used to think Maxis and Dice were too amazing to fail. LOL
 

Phrubruh

Well-Known Member
Disney just has a full experience. For me it is as much about the sounds, sights, and food as it is the rides.
Believe me it get's old wading through 70k of people and hearing children scream and strollers being rammed into you and waiting in hour long lines for over priced popcorn. To me it was a lot more fun to drive up to San Francisco and hang out in the city for a few days.

The Palace of Fine Arts looks nothing like the tiny Little Mermaid dome at DCA. It's much more grand!

 

nesboy43

Well-Known Member
Believe me it get's old wading through 70k of people and hearing children scream and strollers being rammed into you and waiting in hour long lines for over priced popcorn. To me it was a lot more fun to drive up to San Francisco and hang out in the city for a few days.

The Palace of Fine Arts looks nothing like the tiny Little Mermaid dome at DCA. It's much more grand!

For me driving in an area like San Francisco or Los Angeles logistically isn't fun. Although I do like trying new food and restaurants and seeing new sites, all the big cities are just too annoying to navigate in whether it be traffic or parking or overcrowding.

I go through periods of time where I don't want to visit Disney and then after 6 months I'll miss it. I honestly think the parks have not felt crowded to me besides 2017. I usually end up going for the food and scenery so ride times are not my biggest concern. The nice thing is that if someone does want to go on a bunch of rides all they have to do is show up at rope drop, even on the most crowded day and you can do everything before 11.
 
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