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News Big changes coming to EPCOT's Future World?

uncle jimmy

Premium Member
Bland, industrial store with the exact same merchandise you can find in 142 places around WDW. What’s the draw? Zero imagination or creativity involved. Ooo... a Mickey painted on the wall? Sorry. Pass. Do better.
Sadly, this "museum style" design has been the direction companies have gone over the past 10 years. It's to allow the merchandise to be seen, rather than have customers not see it because looking somewhere else or miss seeing it because the merchandise blends in with its surroundings. The merchandise is whats suppose to hold the visual attention, not the background... So depending on the season's "in" colors or something they want to push like F&G the store would have more of that kind of feel to guests. It's easier to add seasonal flowers or Pine trees to a blank canvas... 90's is in right now, so maybe creations will create that feel.

I hope they have details that are missing from the photos that we aren't seeing, which would make one not feel like they are shopping at a store in the mall... surprisingly this design style often times can be very expensive to build, depending on the elements used if its natural or man-made. This is WDI, so it's expensive already. I've had companies build stores and update stores like this that cost multiples of millions each, surprising what a bland design might run. Another reason companies moved to this style is it doesn't become dated as fast for a remodel, update to this style are small, easier and less costly.

Personally, I hold the designers of the merchandise responsible if I don't a t-shirt, hoodie, mug or whatever is in a shop I want to buy but don't. They are the ones creating the designs of the merchandise.
 

ImperfectPixie

Well-Known Member
Sadly, this "museum style" design has been the direction companies have gone over the past 10 years. It's to allow the merchandise to be seen, rather than have customers not see it because looking somewhere else or miss seeing it because the merchandise blends in with its surroundings. The merchandise is whats suppose to hold the visual attention, not the background... So depending on the season's "in" colors or something they want to push like F&G the store would have more of that kind of feel to guests. It's easier to add seasonal flowers or Pine trees to a blank canvas... 90's is in right now, so maybe creations will create that feel.

I hope they have details that are missing from the photos that we aren't seeing, which would make one not feel like they are shopping at a store in the mall... surprisingly this design style often times can be very expensive to build, depending on the elements used if its natural or man-made. This is WDI, so it's expensive already. I've had companies build stores and update stores like this that cost multiples of millions each, surprising what a bland design might run. Another reason companies moved to this style is it doesn't become dated as fast for a remodel, update to this style are small, easier and less costly.

Personally, I hold the designers of the merchandise responsible if I don't a t-shirt, hoodie, mug or whatever is in a shop I want to buy but don't. They are the ones creating the designs of the merchandise.
That's fine for Joe Schmoe clothing store in the middle of a plaza or mall. I don't want "museum style" stores at Disney resorts.
 

HauntedPirate

Sheltered-at-home Park nostalgist
Premium Member
Sadly, this "museum style" design has been the direction companies have gone over the past 10 years. It's to allow the merchandise to be seen, rather than have customers not see it because looking somewhere else or miss seeing it because the merchandise blends in with its surroundings. The merchandise is whats suppose to hold the visual attention, not the background... So depending on the season's "in" colors or something they want to push like F&G the store would have more of that kind of feel to guests. It's easier to add seasonal flowers or Pine trees to a blank canvas... 90's is in right now, so maybe creations will create that feel.

I hope they have details that are missing from the photos that we aren't seeing, which would make one not feel like they are shopping at a store in the mall... surprisingly this design style often times can be very expensive to build, depending on the elements used if its natural or man-made. This is WDI, so it's expensive already. I've had companies build stores and update stores like this that cost multiples of millions each, surprising what a bland design might run. Another reason companies moved to this style is it doesn't become dated as fast for a remodel, update to this style are small, easier and less costly.

Personally, I hold the designers of the merchandise responsible if I don't a t-shirt, hoodie, mug or whatever is in a shop I want to buy but don't. They are the ones creating the designs of the merchandise.

Merchandise design has been going downhill for years. 90% of what’s put out is a rehash of what was just available. Yearly merchandise has slight changes from year to year, and nowhere near enough to set it apart. Anyone else have or remember the t-shirt inspired by this?

6783C0D5-7E67-4CDA-AEF2-8B8404A9A80F.jpeg


I guess the mandate these days is pump out the same stuff year after year, while making sure to latch onto hot trends to extract maximum dollars from the “once in a lifetime” rubes.
 

WondersOfLife

Blink, blink. Breathe, breathe. Day in, day out.

Father Robinson

Well-Known Member
I have no idea, because it renders the rest of the post useless.
Disney World was closed for just over 100 days. Construction resumed soon after the reopening. Now given the "circumstances" of the pandemic, my point was I understand that due to the closure, naturally everything else would be delayed, however, even with the 100+ day closure, it seems strange that it is still taking them longer than it did for them to build and open the park than it is to finish the construction projects they presently are undertaking.

I hope that's clear enough..

And if we're going to blame the pandemic, I'll also point out that Guardians began construction in August of 2017, which if my math is correct was more than 2 years before the closure, and it still isn't close to being done. So..yeah, build and open a park in exactly 3 years in the early 1980s vs not even finishing a rollercoaster in the same amount of time in the 2020s.
 
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WondersOfLife

Blink, blink. Breathe, breathe. Day in, day out.
Disney World was closed for just over 100 days. Construction resumed soon after the reopening. Now given the "circumstances" of the pandemic, my point was I understand that due to the closure, naturally everything else would be delayed, however, even with the 100+ day closure, it seems strange that it is still taking them longer than it did for them to build and open the park than it is to finish the construction projects they presently are undertaking.

I hope that's clear enough..

And if we're going to blame the pandemic, I'll also point out that Guardians began construction in August of 2017, which if my math is correct was more than 2 years before the closure, and it still isn't close to being done. So..yeah, build and open a park in exactly 3 years in the early 1980s vs not even finishing a rollercoaster in the same amount of time in the 2020s.
Fair enough.
 

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