• Welcome to the WDWMAGIC.COM Forums!
    Please take a look around, and feel free to sign up and join the community.You can use your Twitter or Facebook account to sign up, or register directly.

News Announced: Mary Poppins Attraction in UK Pavilion

Casper Gutman

Well-Known Member
Following up on my earlier post about Brave vs. Alice, this is one of the weirdest elements of the modern Disney. Hollywood is IP driven. That's just the way it is. And Disney is going to be motivated to add IPs to their parks. That's not necessarily bad, if the attractions are thematically appropriate (they often aren't) and succeed on their own merits (they often don't).

What is incredibly strange about Disney is the way they seem to value their IPs. Mouse house execs seem to feel all IPs are equal, regardless of box office, cultural footprint, or future prospects. This manifests in a lot of ways. Firstly, Disney owns three of the four most valuable IP packages in the world - SW, Marvel, and Disney animation - but doesn't seem to grasp their value. As soon as Disney got SW, they should have started construction on the related land, and should currently be building the fourth or fifth related attraction. Disneyland should be full of actual Marvel attractions (not thin overlays). Each of the major classic Disney toons should have an attraction or at least be in consideration for one. Frozen, a true cultural phenomenon, should be in line for a land, not another lousy overlay.

Instead, Disney pushes shaky IPs that don't seem likely to build their brand. we have Avatar. We are getting a Tron ride (which is just absurd given the history of the series and the likelihood of future installments). We seem likely to get a Brave ride. WDW cannot stop adding Toy Story content but has nothing related to Monsters, Incredibles (which has a sequel due out next year), or Cars. Wreck-It Ralph is getting another movie but no attraction. GMR got scrapped for a ride based on versions of the Disney stars that will be obsolete in well under a decade.

What is so vexing about Disney's obsession with IPs in the parks is not that it exists but that they are so bad at handling it. Exec thinking seems to stop at "IP equals ride" and go no deeper in evaluating the IP or considering how its inclusion in a park will advance corporate goals. It's kind of mind boggling.
 

yensidtlaw1969

Well-Known Member
Without even looking it up- Queen Elinor, King Fergus, Lords Macintosh, MacGuffin, and Dingwall, Young Macintosh, Young MacGuffin, and Wee Dingwall, Mordu the Demon Bear, Angus the Horse. I want to say the 3 little brothers are named Haggis, Hamish, and Hubert.
Only two of those even registered an "oh yeah, I remember that now" response in my head as I read this. Couldn't have told you the King or Queen's name unprompted, and I enjoyed the movie.

I'm hardly a large enough test pool, but I think you might be a very rare breed that remembers all of those names. Most people probably couldn't give you one of them.
 

Matt_Black

Well-Known Member
Honestly, Disney can make anything relevant. They will force feed their movies until they become popular. Also, Disney re-releases movies to try to prop up their box office sales. Companies do this all the time.
They can, but they don't always want to. Isn't that right Kida?

Kida.jpg

That's Kida's sad face over her movie never being shown on TV.

Following up on my earlier post about Brave vs. Alice, this is one of the weirdest elements of the modern Disney. Hollywood is IP driven. That's just the way it is. And Disney is going to be motivated to add IPs to their parks. That's not necessarily bad, if the attractions are thematically appropriate (they often aren't) and succeed on their own merits (they often don't).

What is incredibly strange about Disney is the way they seem to value their IPs. Mouse house execs seem to feel all IPs are equal, regardless of box office, cultural footprint, or future prospects. This manifests in a lot of ways. Firstly, Disney owns three of the four most valuable IP packages in the world - SW, Marvel, and Disney animation - but doesn't seem to grasp their value. As soon as Disney got SW, they should have started construction on the related land, and should currently be building the fourth or fifth related attraction. Disneyland should be full of actual Marvel attractions (not thin overlays). Each of the major classic Disney toons should have an attraction or at least be in consideration for one. Frozen, a true cultural phenomenon, should be in line for a land, not another lousy overlay.

Instead, Disney pushes shaky IPs that don't seem likely to build their brand. we have Avatar. We are getting a Tron ride (which is just absurd given the history of the series and the likelihood of future installments). We seem likely to get a Brave ride. WDW cannot stop adding Toy Story content but has nothing related to Monsters, Incredibles (which has a sequel due out next year), or Cars. Wreck-It Ralph is getting another movie but no attraction. GMR got scrapped for a ride based on versions of the Disney stars that will be obsolete in well under a decade.

What is so vexing about Disney's obsession with IPs in the parks is not that it exists but that they are so bad at handling it. Exec thinking seems to stop at "IP equals ride" and go no deeper in evaluating the IP or considering how its inclusion in a park will advance corporate goals. It's kind of mind boggling.
Again, if the ride is good, it doesn't matter if people have seen the movie or not. Just ask Splash Mountain.
 
By NO means is this confirmation and by NO means do I speak for @marni1971, however in a GotG/Epcot post about then-upcoming D23 announcements, he alluded to us getting "triplets."

This could very well have meant a trio of Epcot announcements at D23. But I, a major Epcot and Marni fan (aka I spend way too much time trying and failing to de-code him), read it to be a Brave reference for the new UK pavilion attraction.

http://forums.wdwmagic.com/threads/guardians-of-the-galaxy-coming-to-energy-pavilion-at-epcot.915061/page-357#post-7788690
 

disneygeek90

Well-Known Member
I know Brave isn't the most popular IP amongst the masses. This is literally my favorite animated movie and I could cry just thinking about this as a possibility. I admire Merida and her personality more than any other Disney character. I have a large Merida statue (not Jim Shore) and a canvas painting of her in my apartment as well as orange arrow drapes above the window next to it.
I'm trying not to get myself too excited but it's already happening.
 
Last edited:

Matt_Black

Well-Known Member
I know Brave isn't the most popular IP amongst the masses. This is literally my favorite animated movie and I could cry just thinking about this as a possibility. I admire Merida and her personality more than any other Disney character. I have a large Merida statue (not Jim Shore) and a canvas painting of her in my apartment as well as orange arrow drapes above the window next to it.

My work computer makes us change our password every 3 months. A few weeks ago it was my time to change. It's currently "*********." I'm trying not to get myself too excited but it's already happening.
While I appreciate your love of Merida, maybe DON'T broadcast your passwords on message boards?
 
Last edited:

Magenta Panther

Well-Known Member
A "weak" Pixar film is still stronger than nearly all other animated films.
Kung Fu Panda is better than Brave. Zootopia is better than Brave. Big Hero 6 is better than Brave. Just about all of the Golden Age Disney animated films are better than Brave, needless to say, really. Spirited Away is better than Brave. Kiki's Delivery Service is better than Brave (and has a much better heroine). Kubo and the Two Strings is better than Brave. Etc., etc., etc. With the exception of Cars, and only because Cars sucks worse, just about any major quality animated film from any studio is better than Brave IMO.
 
Top Bottom