American Heartland Theme Park, Oklahoma

some other guy

Well-Known Member
There's a difference between a few days sub freezing and two months continually sub freezing. That 28 degrees is the *average* for the month. Which means days or weeks with it being much colder.
well, from a logistical standpoint yeah you'll have to account for that in plumbing or whatever, but if "it's often twenty eight at 5am in January" is your big hurdle for theme park weather that isn't so bad
 

some other guy

Well-Known Member
🧐 Are you from Minnesota?
nattie floridian lol

I'm not saying "let's hit the pool donchano" or anything lol, but I recall a few times there was patches of ice at the contemporary
lows like that consistently will definitely affect what sort of plants you can put in, how you schedule what maintenance, but there's probably not going to be that much guest activity at 5am in January
if they open the doors at 10am that's going to have been a lot of time to get at least only "cold" instead of "really really really cold"
 

celluloid

Well-Known Member
There's a difference between a few days sub freezing and two months continually sub freezing. That 28 degrees is the *average* for the month. Which means days or weeks with it being much colder.

Good thing we live in the 21st century.


Imagine building outdoor waterparks in the lightning capitol of the world. With months where no one really wants to go when storms are more infrequent.
 

imagineer97

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
There's a difference between a few days sub freezing and two months continually sub freezing. That 28 degrees is the *average* for the month. Which means days or weeks with it being much colder.
With the right programming and, dare I say, a price decrease, the park could work in colder weather, depending on what attractions and shows they have.
 

celluloid

Well-Known Member
With the right programming and, dare I say, a price decrease, the park could work in colder weather, depending on what attractions and shows they have.

This has actually happened big time over the last six years and more the last few.

Parks like Busch Gardens Williamsburg and some of Cedar Fairs Parks like Carrowinds.

They extend in with their christmas events with indoor attractions and coasters that can operate in colder temps still running a well as other rides and venues. Then limited time offerings that get people spending their dough. It gives them another few months of operation to some extent until Janurary. So it extends their profits quite a bit and makes passes much more valuable to locals and drivable distances.
 

BrerFoxesBayouAdventure

Well-Known Member

"Americana-themed"

Disney's_America_logo.png

Did they learn nothing from the last time this was attempted?
 

imagineer97

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
I am rooting for this to work.

One of my questions is, were are they going to get their workers? Are there populations close enough to get enough workers?
That's a valid question. I know nothing of Oklahoma. But I suspect there is enough to get it started.

Plus, I can't see all of these former Imagineers signing on for a project that apparently has so little chance of success.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
That's a valid question. I know nothing of Oklahoma. But I suspect there is enough to get it started.

Plus, I can't see all of these former Imagineers signing on for a project that apparently has so little chance of success.
Former Imagineers work on tons of projects that will never be built. They’re paid for design work as it is done. It sucks for a project to die on the drawing board but it’s not like they don’t get paid until something opens.
 

celluloid

Well-Known Member
While we are not used to seeing projects happen.

I think this one actually has a strong potential. What I don't see likely is all of what you see in concept coming into fruition in 2025...or ever.

I think it will start small and open a few things at first if it does open by 2025/2026. That is really close.

Imagine though, its 2026 and three new theme parks have opened in the last year in the United States, and not one of them from Disney.
 

some other guy

Well-Known Member
Former Imagineers work on tons of projects that will never be built. They’re paid for design work as it is done. It sucks for a project to die on the drawing board but it’s not like they don’t get paid until something opens.
totally this
never worked Imagineer but have def done more than a few gigs mixing tech and creativity and while it's very nice to see the ones that go somewhere do their thing, but as long as the check clears for "crazy guy wants a pile of work done and then he throws it in his crazy pile and it goes nowhere", that's kept a roof over my head more than a minute long enough that I'm not gonna complain
 

Twirlnhurl

Well-Known Member
This was to be built on civil war battle fields, right?

This was a big reason why this didn't fly.

I am rooting for the American Heartland to be a success.
Disney's America was going to be built *near* civil war battlefields. The project site is now conventional suburban tract development. The neighbors didn't want the traffic. Any opposition to Disney's America other than that was pretextual.

Regarding the weather in Oklahoma, it is not that different from successful year-round parks in Paris, Osaka, Tokyo, and Beijing--all of which regularly operate in snow. (One of my favorite theme park experiences was riding Jaws at Universal Studios Japan while it was snowing. Most of my friends were eager to be in Wizarding World of Harry Potter in the snow. But Jaws was where it's at!)

The weather would not prevent a great park from getting 5 million visitors if it had the right population base...

The middle of Oklahoma does not even remotely have the population to support those numbers.

5 million annual attendance is about the same as that of Disneyland Paris, a park next to a city of 13 million, and Disneyland Paris has year-round operation despite the winters.

SeaWorld Orlando and Busch Gardens Tampa both have year round operations and get about 4 million guests per year.

A $2 billion investment in that market will create a regional attraction, not a national one. If their pro forma requires 5 million annual attendance, they are going to have a rough go at it. If they can do well at 2 million guests a year, that is probably achievable for that market. But that is a park similar in scope to Six Flags Great Adventure in New Jersey or Six Flags Great America near Chicago.
 

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