Will you get rehired? Probably not - my story

mkt

Maleante Izquierdozo
Premium Member
Original Poster
I was termed in 2003. I - as a character performer - was attacked by a guest, defended myself, and the guest complained. A few CM's that didn't like me wrote out false witness statements, Disney sided with the guest, never reviewed surveillance camera footage ("it's not used for those purposes"), and I was terminated. Security escorted me to the CM bus at Magic Kingdom, the whole nine yards. No need to go into further detail.

Since then, I have completed my education, have obtained two advanced degrees, multiple certifications, have six years of professional experience with a ubiquitous Fortune 100 company, speak four languages (two fluently/two professional fluency), transitioned into a senior role with a major multinational bank, and regularly blow off headhunters on LinkedIn (including some of Disney's own - more on that later). Beyond this, I have held US and NATO security clearances, have been involved as a strategy staffer in presidential campaigns, and overall, got my **** together (while proudly keeping my quirky personality mostly intact).

Guess who still has no rehire at Disney? This guy.

There have been roles within Disney that literally look like someone wrote the description while looking on my resume. - No.

I want a quick holiday job to kill off my spare time. - Too bad.

Disney's own professional headhunters have contacted me on four occasions since the beginning of the year, and every time they dug into my background. Every time, their tone of voice changed from "you'd be a great fit!" to "umm, I gotta go"

I finally sat down with a friend who's internal with the mouse. They've changed their own rules, making rehire something that is very hard, if not impossible to change. Beyond this, the mouse receives more applications than they'll ever need, from people who don't have a prior negative history with Disney. So why would bring me back?

What should this tell you? Buy an AP, get a job elsewhere, and move on with your life - because the odds are stacked very highly against you.

And if you MUST have a low paying, guest facing job. Go be a flight attendant. At least the flight benefits will make you the most popular person in your Facebook timeline.
 
Last edited:

Master Yoda

Pro Star Wars geek.
Premium Member
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I finally sat down with a friend who's internal with the mouse. They've changed their own rules, making rehire something that is very hard, if not impossible to change. Beyond this, the mouse receives more applications than they'll ever need, from people who don't have a prior negative history with Disney. So why would bring me back?
This is it in a nutshell.

It would not surprise me at all if the applicant to job ratio at WDW exceeds 100:1, even for the skilled roles like performers.

Unless you are applying for a job that only you and a handful of others can do, there is simply no reason for a employer to take a chance on someone that already has a black spot on their file with the company.
 

21stamps

Well-Known Member
Are those jobs really meant for people who have completed their education?

I wouldn't worry about it. There are plenty of other "quick holiday jobs to kill off spare time".
Better yet, use that spare time to travel!
 

Tony the Tigger

Well-Known Member
From a practical standpoint regardless of changes in the Disney rehire policy: while the qualifications you have since acquired are impressive, none of them preclude you from "defending yourself" against a guest again. Maybe others would have run away instead, I don't know what the official policy is for a cast member to do in that situation, but I'm guessing it's not "fight back."

But I'm glad you seem to have gotten some resolution, moved on, etc.
 

MichWolv

Born Modest. Wore Off.
Premium Member
Are those jobs really meant for people who have completed their education?

I wouldn't worry about it. There are plenty of other "quick holiday jobs to kill off spare time".
Better yet, use that spare time to travel!
From a practical standpoint regardless of changes in the Disney rehire policy: while the qualifications you have since acquired are impressive, none of them preclude you from "defending yourself" against a guest again. Maybe others would have run away instead, I don't know what the official policy is for a cast member to do in that situation, but I'm guessing it's not "fight back."

But I'm glad you seem to have gotten some resolution, moved on, etc.
I'm pretty sure the jobs he's been contacted about recently by head hunters pose no "defending yourself against guest" issues and do indeed require education, as they are, I believe, professional positions where he'd be in an office.

Disney's policy certainly seems to be that the don't need to take a risk on somebody who has "failed" before, even if the new role is completely different and the person in question might well have changed. Can't say I blame them, given the number of applicants they likely have, but it is can certainly feel unfair to know that there is literally nothing you can do to make up for a previous mistake.

In any event, it's a good warning for anybody working for Disney who might not be taking the job serious enough -- get fired now from an $8/hour seasonal position, and you aren't eligible for the rest of your life for any position in the company, from $8/hour ride operator, all the way to six figure advertising exec, graphic artist, or movie production jobs.
 

CaptainAmerica

Premium Member
What should this tell you? Buy an AP, get a job elsewhere, and move on with your life - because the odds are stacked very highly against you.
Alternatively: Don't get fired for fighting with guests and you won't jeopardize your rehire status.

A few CM's that didn't like me wrote out false witness statements...
Also, find a way to get along with your coworkers. There are a number of red flags in your story that indicate you might not be telling the whole truth.
 

Tony the Tigger

Well-Known Member
I'm pretty sure the jobs he's been contacted about recently by head hunters pose no "defending yourself against guest" issues and do indeed require education, as they are, I believe, professional positions where he'd be in an office.
That's a very good point I didn't think of.

In any event, it's a good warning for anybody working for Disney who might not be taking the job serious enough -- get fired now from an $8/hour seasonal position, and you aren't eligible for the rest of your life for any position in the company, from $8/hour ride operator, all the way to six figure advertising exec, graphic artist, or movie production jobs.
And that's another one!
 

21stamps

Well-Known Member
I'm pretty sure the jobs he's been contacted about recently by head hunters pose no "defending yourself against guest" issues and do indeed require education, as they are, I believe, professional positions where he'd be in an office.

Disney's policy certainly seems to be that the don't need to take a risk on somebody who has "failed" before, even if the new role is completely different and the person in question might well have changed. Can't say I blame them, given the number of applicants they likely have, but it is can certainly feel unfair to know that there is literally nothing you can do to make up for a previous mistake.

In any event, it's a good warning for anybody working for Disney who might not be taking the job serious enough -- get fired now from an $8/hour seasonal position, and you aren't eligible for the rest of your life for any position in the company, from $8/hour ride operator, all the way to six figure advertising exec, graphic artist, or movie production jobs.
For seasonal employment though? He was talking about part time/seasonal work as well. I can't imagine that they have openings in their advertising or graphic artist, or production execs for a month or less out of the year.
 

MichWolv

Born Modest. Wore Off.
Premium Member
For seasonal employment though? He was talking about part time/seasonal work as well. I can't imagine that they have openings in their advertising or graphic artist, or production execs for a month or less out of the year.
I'm pretty sure he was referencing a number of times over the past decade or more where he has inquired about getting hired. So while he might well have inquired about seasonal park jobs, in the past, I'm pretty sure the recent headhunter ones are professional positions. Headhunters don't headhunt for seasonal.
 

21stamps

Well-Known Member
I'm pretty sure he was referencing a number of times over the past decade or more where he has inquired about getting hired. So while he might well have inquired about seasonal park jobs, in the past, I'm pretty sure the recent headhunter ones are professional positions. Headhunters don't headhunt for seasonal.
Nope they don't. I was addressing the seasonal ones... I vote for travel over work during these times!! :)
 

mkt

Maleante Izquierdozo
Premium Member
Original Poster
Alternatively: Don't get fired for fighting with guests and you won't jeopardize your rehire status.
Of course. That's great advice. Tell me again what you'd do when you get sucker punched by an idiot guest?

Also, find a way to get along with your coworkers. There are a number of red flags in your story that indicate you might not be telling the whole truth.
I appreciate being questioned and criticized over something that happened a bit over 13 years ago, which I only brought back to illustrate the difference between 2003 Rob and 2016 Rob in terms of employability and marketability on the job market, as well as desirability to the mouse.

Having said that, your advice was taken many years ago, and I've since enjoyed good working relationships with my colleagues, including several that turned into friendships.

Also, if there are red flags, please tell me what they are. I'd love for you to tell me in perfect detail something that happened 13 years ago, which you tried to forget.

For seasonal employment though? He was talking about part time/seasonal work as well. I can't imagine that they have openings in their advertising or graphic artist, or production execs for a month or less out of the year.
I was looking for a part time or seasonal job to give my days some structure, as well as generate some income in order to not drain my savings and severance while I searched for the right job after being laid off in January. I figured WDW could be fun

I'm pretty sure he was referencing a number of times over the past decade or more where he has inquired about getting hired. So while he might well have inquired about seasonal park jobs, in the past, I'm pretty sure the recent headhunter ones are professional positions. Headhunters don't headhunt for seasonal.
I believe I've attempted to return four times. Maybe 5.

Only one time was I actually given the opportunity to proceed with a petition to change my rehire status - and it was my first attempted. But it was before Disney accepted online applications for entry level roles - when you'd have to go in person to casting and fil out a paper application. This was in early 2005, about 15 months from my termination. They had asked me to provide a year's proof of stable employment and a letter of reference - those weren't possible since I only had 11 month's employment with a company that refused to provide that proof - only phone verification via the Work Number.

Afterward, my next attempts were all through the online system, from whcih I never heard back - and my most recent attempt, the final, was the first time they replied with no rehire via email, which I subsequently verified over the phone and was told there is no way to change that.

The headhunters contacted me for advertising design roles in the company.
 

mkt

Maleante Izquierdozo
Premium Member
Original Poster
lol Flight Attendant. My lord, how dare you. :p
Hey, I made it to the final round with Jetblue before I took the job in Miami.

And if I had been picked for the training class, who knows. I probably would've taken it, and freelanced on my days off.
 

21stamps

Well-Known Member
It is not exactly a bad gig.

A friend of my oldest 2 daughters started as one a couple of years ago. She is making around $40k/year, no college education required and can fly pretty much anywhere in the world for free.
If I had a modest trust fund I would be a flight attendant just for the travel deals!!!
 

Master Yoda

Pro Star Wars geek.
Premium Member
If I had a modest trust fund I would be a flight attendant just for the travel deals!!!
She is young with a fiance and no kids and she is taking full advantage of it.

I love seeing her posts from when she has something like a 24 hour layover in Paris, London or the like. She is also from South Africa and here parents moved back a few years ago. Thanks to her job, she can fly a third of the way around the world and visit them a few times a year.
 

21stamps

Well-Known Member
She is young with a fiance and no kids and she is taking full advantage of it.

I love seeing her posts from when she has something like a 24 hour layover in Paris, London or the like. She is also from South Africa and here parents moved back a few years ago. Thanks to her job, she can fly a third of the way around the world and visit them a few times a year.
That's awesome! I bet she loves her job!
 

Donillary Crumpton

Well-Known Member
Disney sided with the guest, never reviewed surveillance camera footage ("it's not used for those purposes"), and I was terminated.
There was video footage evidence available, and Disney wouldn't even look at it to see if maybe you had a legitimate reason to be defending yourself? That company doesn't deserve to have someone like you. Consider yourself the lucky one, and devote your efforts to companies which can properly balance the "guest is always right" motto with some flex room when rare occasions like this occur. Guests are not always right. Attacking a CM would be one of those circumstances. For Disney to not even glance at available evidence before coming to a conclusion shows that you are far better off without them, and never should have lost a moment's rest over being terminated.
 
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rk03221

Well-Known Member
I was termed in 2003. I - as a character performer - was attacked by a guest, defended myself, and the guest complained. A few CM's that didn't like me wrote out false witness statements, Disney sided with the guest, never reviewed surveillance camera footage ("it's not used for those purposes"), and I was terminated. Security escorted me to the CM bus at Magic Kingdom, the whole nine yards. No need to go into further detail.

Since then, I have completed my education, have obtained two advanced degrees, multiple certifications, have six years of professional experience with a ubiquitous Fortune 100 company, speak four languages (two fluently/two professional fluency), transitioned into a senior role with a major multinational bank, and regularly blow off headhunters on LinkedIn (including some of Disney's own - more on that later). Beyond this, I have held US and NATO security clearances, have been involved as a strategy staffer in presidential campaigns, and overall, got my **** together (while proudly keeping my quirky personality mostly intact).

Guess who still has no rehire at Disney? This guy.

There have been roles within Disney that literally look like someone wrote the description while looking on my resume. - No.

I want a quick holiday job to kill off my spare time. - Too bad.

Disney's own professional headhunters have contacted me on four occasions since the beginning of the year, and every time they dug into my background. Every time, their tone of voice changed from "you'd be a great fit!" to "umm, I gotta go"

I finally sat down with a friend who's internal with the mouse. They've changed their own rules, making rehire something that is very hard, if not impossible to change. Beyond this, the mouse receives more applications than they'll ever need, from people who don't have a prior negative history with Disney. So why would bring me back?

What should this tell you? Buy an AP, get a job elsewhere, and move on with your life - because the odds are stacked very highly against you.

And if you MUST have a low paying, guest facing job. Go be a flight attendant. At least the flight benefits will make you the most popular person in your Facebook timeline.

I left disney to work for a better company and it was the best decision I ever made. The pay, management and the way they treat CMs is absolutely horrible. I tried so hard to be happy working there but I never was so I left and havent been happier. It only took me three years. Trust me, disney isnt good for long term anyways, if you live in the area and want to have a job for "fun" I would recommend Universal, they are way better than disney employment wise.
 
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