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What should HS's icon be?

Which building at HS should be the park's icon?

  • Hollywood Tower Hotel

    Votes: 35 26.1%
  • The Chinese Theatre

    Votes: 90 67.2%
  • Animation Studios Archway

    Votes: 2 1.5%
  • Gertie

    Votes: 1 0.7%
  • Eisner's Left Big Toe

    Votes: 6 4.5%

  • Total voters
    134

rreading

Premium Member
Disney icons are those items that are relatable to the park general themes, welcomes and draws the guests in, catches their attention and sets them up for the day of fun. The Chinese Theatre better fits those parameters unlike the others. Its long past history of celebrities, their films and and what it stands for, should put it clearly in as the park Icon. ( Despite whats housed inside.)
I would agree - but that it's not a Disney Icon. The Death Star would be a bit of a stretch in that even though it wasn't Disney, they own it now. But unless I'm mistaken, the actual Chinese Theater is completely independent of Disney and thus couldn't? shouldn't? wouldn't be used as an Icon by Disney
 

WondersOfLife

Blink, blink. Breathe, breathe. Day in, day out.
Original Poster
Theater is a place, theatre is an art form
Not always true. Many stage theaters are known as theatre. Such as "The Fox Theatre" in Georgia or my family's location, "The Inman Theatre." Also... Broadway..

1.PNG


Theatre is formal. Theater is generic.
 

ppet

Well-Known Member
In the past I would have said the Chinese Theater, but now it should just be a giant buzzing light saber melting thru credit cards. Or maybe a statue of a dad reaching into his back pocket for his wallet.
 

Jon81uk

Well-Known Member
I'm going with the original park icon from day one. The Chinese Theater.
View attachment 534574
View attachment 534575
View attachment 534576

All of those brochures are photos of the park though, I don't think they are able to use a graphical representation of the theatre as an icon for the park because it is an actual building in Hollywood not owned by Disney. I'm not sure what icon they put on merchandise back in the 90s but I think it was mainly either the water tower or Mickey with the clapboard.
 

JIMINYCR

Well-Known Member
I would agree - but that it's not a Disney Icon. The Death Star would be a bit of a stretch in that even though it wasn't Disney, they own it now. But unless I'm mistaken, the actual Chinese Theater is completely independent of Disney and thus couldn't? shouldn't? wouldn't be used as an Icon by Disney
A shown above, it hasnt stopped Disney from using it in many ways to showcase the park in the past.
 

Heppenheimer

Well-Known Member
All of those brochures are photos of the park though, I don't think they are able to use a graphical representation of the theatre as an icon for the park because it is an actual building in Hollywood not owned by Disney. I'm not sure what icon they put on merchandise back in the 90s but I think it was mainly either the water tower or Mickey with the clapboard.
I might be combining things in my memory into stuff that never actually existed, but I seem to recall early on that they used Mickey with the clapboard highlighted in front of the MGM lion logo.
 

The Empress Lilly

Well-Known Member
I would go with the Theater, but no candidate is as natural an icon as the icons of the other three parks.

ToT has the disadvantage of being a ruin, a regrettable design choice for such a prominent building and which renders it less usable as a park icon.

The Theater for its part is a derived landmark, a Disneyfied copy. Which limits its use for emotional identification with Disney, a prime objective of a park icon.

The Earfell Tower was peripherally located and a bit too industrial to elicit much affection.

The arch and globe Mickey are too small.
 

WondersOfLife

Blink, blink. Breathe, breathe. Day in, day out.
Original Poster
I would go with the Theater, but no candidate is as natural an icon as the icons of the other three parks.

ToT has the disadvantage of being a ruin, a regrettable design choice for such a prominent building and which renders it less usable as a park icon.

The Theater for its part is a derived landmark, a Disneyfied copy. Which limits its use for emotional identification with Disney, a prime objective of a park icon.

The Earfell Tower was peripherally located and a bit too industrial to elicit much affection.

The arch and globe Mickey are too small.
Gotta be Gertie then.
 

WondersOfLife

Blink, blink. Breathe, breathe. Day in, day out.
Original Poster
Theater, center - American
Theatre, centre - English

The Chinese Theater is located in the US so takes American spelling. In the UK, films would be played in a cinema rather than a theatre to begin with.
But it doesn't take the American spelling. Look it up. The official name is Grauman's Chinese Theatre.
 

Tomi-Rocket

Well-Known Member
I just don’t understand the theatre choice, quite simply it’s NOT a Disney creation. The Sorcerer’s hat is, the Earful Tower, and ToT is. While I like all three of those I still prefer ToT, I think it looks cool when it’s displayed with the other three park icons. Plus, I LOVE that ride. 😊
 
Not always true. Many stage theaters are known as theatre. Such as "The Fox Theatre" in Georgia or my family's location, "The Inman Theatre." Also... Broadway..

View attachment 534627

Theatre is formal. Theater is generic.
While you hold a good point here, I believe these names are attributed to the Theatre Company which would justify the "Re"

I don't claim to be an English guru, just my understanding on the topic. Interesting topic, indeed.
 

WondersOfLife

Blink, blink. Breathe, breathe. Day in, day out.
Original Poster
While you hold a good point here, I believe these names are attributed to the Theatre Company which would justify the "Re"

I don't claim to be an English guru, just my understanding on the topic. Interesting topic, indeed.
The theatrical venues are not the performing artists’ company. They’re the names of the venue. I myself am not an English guru... but this conversation is brought up sooooo many times and nobody has a clear answer.

If it helps my point at all, I have an bachelor degree in Theatre Tech. But basically we had a whole class conversation about this one day for improv/debate purposes... and it basically boiled down to “it’s interchangeable. One just sounds more fancy than the other.” And “nobody knows.”

So it is really either or. Whether it is the art form itself, or the physical building. You’ll see so many people using both versions of the word for all categories.
 

Robbiem

Well-Known Member
I might be combining things in my memory into stuff that never actually existed, but I seem to recall early on that they used Mickey with the clapboard highlighted in front of the MGM lion logo.
I remember this - the logo from the studio arch was on lots of things.

Disney should do a new version with the 20th century searchlight logo
 

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