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Tripods allowed

lee.moles.disney

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Sorry if this has been mentioned.

We recently bought a Sony A7 MK2 which is my husbands new hobby. We want to bring it to WDW on our trip next year but wondered if Tripods are allowed?

We totally understand etiquette and don’t want to be ‘that family’ who blocks etc but where there’s the two of us and our son, we like the idea of using a tripod so all 3 of us are in the picture and on a timer.

Would one be allowed at character meet and greets, especially where they have replaced the photographer with the camera boxes?

Thanks
Lee
 

drizgirl

Well-Known Member
You can bring a tripod that will fold down small enough to fit in a backpack.

I can't imagine having time to set up a tripod at a meet and greet. Better to set it and have the character attendant take the shot for you.

I would never put a camera on a tripod in a Disney park without being able to keep my hand on it the entire time. To many unpredictable people around who could knock it over.
 

drizgirl

Well-Known Member
I believe tripods have to be small and non extending.
There are still photopass photographers around the parks and you can get ANYONE to take your picture.
You're not going to have time or space to set up a tripod at a meet and greet.
That's incorrect. From the list of prohibited items, tripods that extend beyond 6' or will not fit in a backpack are excluded.

https://disneyworld.disney.go.com/park-rules/
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
That's incorrect. From the list of prohibited items, tripods that extend beyond 6' or will not fit in a backpack are excluded.

https://disneyworld.disney.go.com/park-rules/
The way the sentence reads one might think you are saying the large tripods are excluded from the list of prohibited items... they are in fact on the list of prohibited items not excluded from it.

And unless you plan on taking photos at night there is little reason to have a tripod beyond trying to do group photos of everyone in your family at once, and if those times are only going to be at meet and greets you can always get someone in line behind you to take the photo for you if there is no cast member. I wouldn't hand random people in the park my camera to shoot photos of my family because there is the chance they might simply run off with it, but that odds of that happening in a meet and greet are probably much lower.
 

BoarderPhreak

Well-Known Member
As much as I'd love to bring a proper tripod to the parks, I just don't want to carry it - or deploy it and break it down repeatedly. If I was a local, had an AP and lots of time... Sure. That's a different story. But as an occasional tourist, it just ain't happening.

That said, yes - tripods are allowed. As mentioned, they must fit in a backpack and not be taller than 6' or so... Which covers a lot of ground, really.
 

donsullivan

Premium Member
Sorry if this has been mentioned.

We recently bought a Sony A7 MK2 which is my husbands new hobby. We want to bring it to WDW on our trip next year but wondered if Tripods are allowed?

We totally understand etiquette and don’t want to be ‘that family’ who blocks etc but where there’s the two of us and our son, we like the idea of using a tripod so all 3 of us are in the picture and on a timer.

Would one be allowed at character meet and greets, especially where they have replaced the photographer with the camera boxes?

Thanks
Lee

I've been bringing a tripod into the parks for decades with zero issues. As noted above, the tripod should not extend to a height taller than the photographer and must fold up to the height of a backpack. But if your tripod fits within those bounds you are fine.

When using a tripod, the most important rule is to make sure you never block any walkway or create any sort of obstruction to guest flow of any kind. As long as you follow that core guideline of never creating an obstruction you'll be fine.

If the goal is to place the tripod and then go jump in the shot, I would strongly discourage against that. The general protocol is that you should always be standing alongside your tripod when you are using it in the park. Not to mention, it's extremely common for guests (especially the youngest ones) to not be paying close attention to where they are walking and I can assure you they'll bump into it and knock over his very nice camera. I'm not exactly the size person that you can miss when walking by and I always need to worry about some distracted kid or stroller that needs to break the sound barrier bumping into me or my tripod.

Placing a tripod at character meet and greets will not be allowed at any time whether it's a human or robotic photographer. It doesn't matter, you will not be able to do it. It takes too much time, creates an obstruction and slows the flow of all those other families in line behind you waiting to meet that character. The PhotoPass photographer will be happy to take a few shots for you if you setup your camera for the environment and then hand it over to them.
 

CapeCodTenor

New Member
I haven't been in years, but a tripod in the World isn't a good idea. If you need one for low light, then consider a monopod. Monopods fit easily into a backpack and can be used quite quickly if you're use to using it. I've used my Monopod where I wasn't supposed to because I was quick at deploying it and breaking it down. If you need a family photo, consider having someone use your cell phone for a family picture, or give your camera to a photopass photographer, providing it's all set up for the lighting and what not. Hope this helps.
 

donsullivan

Premium Member
I haven't been in years, but a tripod in the World isn't a good idea. If you need one for low light, then consider a monopod. Monopods fit easily into a backpack and can be used quite quickly if you're use to using it. I've used my Monopod where I wasn't supposed to because I was quick at deploying it and breaking it down. If you need a family photo, consider having someone use your cell phone for a family picture, or give your camera to a photopass photographer, providing it's all set up for the lighting and what not. Hope this helps.
Unilaterally saying a tripod isn't a good idea is a bit extreme. There are times and scenarios where bringing a tripod and using a tripod is totally fine if you follow guidelines similar to those I described above. You need to understand why you want to bring it with you and make sure those goals are consistent with the protocols that you must always be 'attached' to it, and you must never make an obstruction of yourself with it. If your objective is to photograph yourself and/or your family while visiting, then see the guidelines I described above- it's not likely going to be a good idea. If you want to photograph fireworks (when they return) or similar after dark situations, then it's totally fine if you follow the 'rules' of tripod etiquette to not make an obstruction of yourself and always stay close enough to the tripod to physical touch it at all times.
 

CapeCodTenor

New Member
Unilaterally saying a tripod isn't a good idea is a bit extreme. There are times and scenarios where bringing a tripod and using a tripod is totally fine if you follow guidelines similar to those I described above. You need to understand why you want to bring it with you and make sure those goals are consistent with the protocols that you must always be 'attached' to it, and you must never make an obstruction of yourself with it. If your objective is to photograph yourself and/or your family while visiting, then see the guidelines I described above- it's not likely going to be a good idea. If you want to photograph fireworks (when they return) or similar after dark situations, then it's totally fine if you follow the 'rules' of tripod etiquette to not make an obstruction of yourself and always stay close enough to the tripod to physical touch it at all times.

You're correct, a bad use of words. But what I was thinking was more along the lines of a normal no COVID year when the parks are extremely crowded. Yes, there are those who have used a tripod in the parks with no problem, but I was thinking more from my perspective when I wrote that and shouldn't have. I like my tripod, and recently upgraded to amore sturdier one, but use it very little because it can be cumbersome to set up (I shudder to think about me trying to set one up in a crowded park). I have, however, when I need something to help hold the camera steady, used my monopod to great effect...that's why I mentioned it. Again, poor choice of words on my part.
 
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drizgirl

Well-Known Member
You're correct, a bad use of words. But what I was thinking was more along the lines of a normal no COVID year when the parks are extremely crowded. Yes, there are those who have used a tripod in the parks with no problem, but I was thinking more from my perspective when I wrote that and shouldn't have. I like my tripod, and recently upgraded to amore sturdier one, but use it very little because it can be cumbersome to set up (I shudder to think about me trying to set one up in a crowded park). I have, however, when I need something to help hold the camera steady, used my monopod to great effect...that's why I mentioned it. Again, poor choice of words on my part.
A monopod isn’t going to get the job done for long exposure fireworks.
 

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