Tipping - Orlando in General!

STEVEO1982

Member
Original Poster
Hello all,

As the title suggests I am interested to know about tipping. Been watching vlogs online etc and I know about tipping at external restaurants but what is the policy for park restaurants inc disney universal seaworld etc.

What percentages etc is standard across the board or does it vary based on park, resort etc?

Thanks
Steve
 

The Pho

Well-Known Member
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Tipping is pretty standard across the board for anywhere you go in the country.

15% for decent to good service
18-20% for great service.

Wait staff are generally not well paid and rely on these tips as their salary.
 

aliceismad

Well-Known Member
I always tip 20% or more unless the service was bad. (I worked in food service and know what living on tips was like, so now that I can afford it, I try to pay it back.) The only place I don't tip is on cruises or all-inclusives because the tip is built in (and even then, I tend to tip extra). I don't know of anyplace in the Orlando area that is considered all-inclusive. Even with the Disney Dining Plan, your tips are not included.
 

CaptainAmerica

Premium Member
OP, I assume you're not American?

To be clear, tipping is not expected at quick service restaurants, i.e. restaurants where you stand in line to order your food and pick it up at the counter. Table-service (where you order from a waiter) only.
 

Weather_Lady

Well-Known Member
We generally tip 20% at any table service restaurant (a la carte, buffet), wherever located.

No tips are expected or required at counter service restaurants (where you're ordering and picking up your food at a counter, bringing it to a table yourself, and disposing of your trash after.)

Other random tipping situations: 20% for personal services and transportation (e.g., salon/spa, rideshare or taxi driver). $1-$2/bag for anyone who handles our luggage (e.g., Magical Express bus driver, Bell Services deliveryman), $1-$2/drink at a bar or lounge (depending on the cost/complexity of the drink, and the generousness of the pour), and $5-$10/day for hotel housekeeping ($10 is for the last day, for the person who has to "turn over" the entire room).
 
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CaptainAmerica

Premium Member
Aside from restaurants, typical situations where a gratuity would be appropriate include bell services ($1 per bag but not less than $5 total), housekeeping ($1-$2 per guest per day), and bartenders ($2 per drink). These are highly subjective of course, with some people tipping much more and others not tipping at all. Dining is the one with the "clearest" standard, with 18% being a very safe target.
 

CaptainAmerica

Premium Member
Also, don't do the "handshake tip" where you conceal the money in the palm of your hand. You look like a jerk. Shake the person's hand if you want to, but discreetly hand them the tip with your left hand.
 

STEVEO1982

Member
Original Poster
Thanks all for your replys! Yes not American but have been to Orlando plenty of times but my dad always took care of the tips. Now I am the dad I want to make sure I do it right and I dont short change anyone. My wife wants to try lots of different table service restaurants inside and outside of the parks as she has only been once before and we mostly done quick service.
 

Meglen8

Member
I tip 20% unless service was bad than I can go10-15% depending on how bad. Last trip to tusker house I wish I could have tipped low but we were a party of 6 so it was already included. Our server was just flat out rude the whole time
 

Jon81uk

Well-Known Member
We generally tip 20% at any table service restaurant (a la carte, buffet), wherever located.

No tips are expected or required at counter service restaurants (where you're ordering and picking up your food at a counter, bringing it to a table yourself, and disposing of your trash after.)

Other random tipping situations: 20% for personal services and transportation (e.g., salon/spa, rideshare or taxi driver). $1-$2/bag for anyone who handles our luggage (e.g., Magical Express bus driver, Bell Services deliveryman), $1-$2/drink at a bar or lounge (depending on the cost/complexity of the drink, and the generousness of the pour), and $5-$10/day for hotel housekeeping ($10 is for the last day, for the person who has to "turn over" the entire room).
Aside from restaurants, typical situations where a gratuity would be appropriate include bell services ($1 per bag but not less than $5 total), housekeeping ($1-$2 per guest per day), and bartenders ($2 per drink). These are highly subjective of course, with some people tipping much more and others not tipping at all. Dining is the one with the "clearest" standard, with 18% being a very safe target.
As far as I knew housekeeping are paid better than waiting staff and therefore a tip for them is very much optional? I've never left one. But them I am British.
 

Weather_Lady

Well-Known Member
As far as I knew housekeeping are paid better than waiting staff and therefore a tip for them is very much optional? I've never left one. But them I am British.
The average Disney housekeeper is making a little over $20,000 per year before taxes -- on par with housekeeping at other hotels, but only about 4 times what my family typically spends on a 1-week Disney vacation. You are absolutely right that a tip is optional - a courtesy rather than a requirement. However, in light of the fact that my household income is several times that of a Disney housekeeper, and that we're generally very pleased with the quality of service they provide, I like to leave a tip. It is, however, a personal choice for each guest.
 

Weather_Lady

Well-Known Member
Oh you fancy huh?
LOL - no (although now you've got Drake totally stuck in my head). The median household income in the U.S. is three times a Disney housekeeping salary, so most people on this board could make the same statement: we ain't fancy, we're just typical.
 
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Jon81uk

Well-Known Member
The average Disney housekeeper is making a little over $20,000 per year before taxes -- on par with housekeeping at other hotels, but only about 4 times what my family typically spends on a 1-week Disney vacation. You are absolutely right that a tip is optional - a courtesy rather than a requirement. However, in light of the fact that my household income is several times that of a Disney housekeeper, and that we're generally very pleased with the quality of service they provide, I like to leave a tip. It is, however, a personal choice for each guest.
That's the impression I've already had, housekeeping tips are a personal choice. Tips to wait staff are very much required as their pay is even lower before tips.
 
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