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The most Swiss Part of Disneyland

Phrubruh

Well-Known Member
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Not a big loss.
 

Rich T

Well-Known Member
Come on. All they really did was add a rope bridge and some static Tarzan figures. The movie it was based on is far obscure for anyone today to reference.
You didn't have to have seen the film or read the book to pick up on the incredible sense of adventure the treehouse offered in its details and its wonderful climbing route. You actually felt like you were climbing up into the tree, discovering the story as you went. Now you climb a set of stairs, cross a bridge to the top of the treehouse, and go down past some cheap Tarzan statues. There is no adventure anymore. It's like going to Rainforest Cafe. Once the treehouse was a must-do unique experience and very much part of DL's character, and now it's...Pffffff. Main Street Windows Dioramas in a tree.
 

Phrubruh

Well-Known Member
You didn't have to have seen the film or read the book to pick up on the incredible sense of adventure the treehouse offered in its details and its wonderful climbing route. You actually felt like you were climbing up into the tree, discovering the story as you went. Now you climb a set of stairs, cross a bridge to the top of the treehouse, and go down past some cheap Tarzan statues. There is no adventure anymore. It's like going to Rainforest Cafe. Once the treehouse was a must-do unique experience and very much part of DL's character, and now it's...Pffffff. Main Street Windows Dioramas in a tree.
Except to the average Joe they would never get that "incredible sense of adventure" climbing a lot of stairs. It was just something to let the kids go climb up as the exhausted parents waited outside. It was dated back in the 70's. At least now it has a tie in to a Disney movie people know.
 

Rich T

Well-Known Member
Except to the average Joe they would never get that "incredible sense of adventure" climbing a lot of stairs. It was just something to let the kids go climb up as the exhausted parents waited outside. It was dated back in the 70's. At least now it has a tie in to a Disney movie people know.
The kids are the ones who benefited the most, for sure: I certainly loved it long before I saw the movie or read the book. You climbed...up and up...looking down in amazement at how far you'd gotten. You'd stare in wonder at the various rooms and imagine what it would be like to be shipwrecked on an island... to live in such a rugged-but-wonderful setting. You'd figure out how the running water system worked and be delighted. You'd see the bedroom at the very top and decide it was the best bedroom in the history of everything. And then you'd head down--a much quicker journey. And all the while, that wonderful tune kept playing...

But, yeah, I realize that means nothing to Disney now. I guess theme parks shouldn't strive to be "good" for people's brains. Today's Disney wants to talk down to the "average Joe" and--instead of inspiring him--just convince him to buy some movie merch. The park used to aim higher than that.
 
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