Reservation system here to stay? Update from Josh D'Amaro

Djsfantasi

Active Member
Well it could allow them to hedge their bets as to when they actually visit the parks perhaps? 🤷‍♀️
If they cancel the tickets, their park reservations are cancelled. Once new tickets are purchased or rescheduled, they can try for new park reservations. Of course, if they reschedule for a time close to the original ticket, availability of park reservations may be hard to get.
 

_caleb

Well-Known Member
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If I understand your response, cancelling those tickets also cancels the park reservation. Hence, there is no benefit to this hack! And there may be a cost of interest on the purchase depending on when the cancellation hits your account. From the banks point of view, you had the benefit of their money for a period of time which exceeded any grace period. Ka ching.
Sorry I wasn’t clear. If a family of 4 can purchase 16 tickets for a particular day at the parks (say, 4 for each park on that day) and make reservations at those parks because they’re not sure which park they’d like to go to that day, they would be “taking up” 12 more reservations than they need just to keep their options open.

If there’s no penalty for that family to cancel the reservations they decide not to use (or just move their tickets to a later date), they will have effectively gamed the system in a way that limits reservation availability for others.
 

nickys

Premium Member
If they cancel the tickets, their park reservations are cancelled. Once new tickets are purchased or rescheduled, they can try for new park reservations. Of course, if they reschedule for a time close to the original ticket, availability of park reservations may be hard to get.

The comment was about booking more reservations than someone needs.

Buying more days than you need and then cancelling allows someone to hedge their bets, whilst getting money back or booking alternative dates.

It’s a lot of work and hassle but it would work if someone really wanted to do it.
 

Djsfantasi

Active Member
Sorry I wasn’t clear. If a family of 4 can purchase 16 tickets for a particular day at the parks (say, 4 for each park on that day) and make reservations at those parks because they’re not sure which park they’d like to go to that day, they would be “taking up” 12 more reservations than they need just to keep their options open.

If there’s no penalty for that family to cancel the reservations they decide not to use (or just move their tickets to a later date), they will have effectively gamed the system in a way that limits reservation availability for others.

But that cannot happen. Each ticket can get a reservation at one park per day. If I have a valid ticket on one day and make a reservation for MK, I CANT reserve another park for that day. Hence a family of four can only make four reservations at one park per day.
 

Djsfantasi

Active Member
The comment was about booking more reservations than someone needs.

Buying more days than you need and then cancelling allows someone to hedge their bets, whilst getting money back or booking alternative dates.

It’s a lot of work and hassle but it would work if someone really wanted to do it.

But when you cancel a ticket, unless you buy individual park tickets for each person for each day (sixteen tickets in your exsmple) which would be very expensive even when you end up keeping only four tickets per person... Then your scheme might work. But your paying a premium for multiple one day tickets. And you won’t have total flexibility because you have to cancel the undesired tickets several days in advance. So unless you want to gamble on same day reservations, it’ll cost you. And if you’re the gambling type, going through all this work is a waste of time anyway.
 
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Jae Sea

Member
They can still do park reservations with park hopping. Before you head over to another park, there just has to be a reservation available. Then once you leave, that reservation opens at that park for someone else. They have the technology to do that and know where people are at all times. One park per day is dumb and ridiculous when they aren't even at capacity some days.
 

Djsfantasi

Active Member
They can still do park reservations with park hopping. Before you head over to another park, there just has to be a reservation available. Then once you leave, that reservation opens at that park for someone else. They have the technology to do that and know where people are at all times. One park per day is dumb and ridiculous when they aren't even at capacity some days.

I don’t think that will work at this time. Once you make a park reservation for a ticket for a given day, you are locked out of any other park reservations for a given day at this time. While you think that’s dumb and ridiculous, that is the current system.

I tried. Doesn’t work.
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
Assuming some return to relative “new normalcy”...I expect park hopping to return...

What I’m not so sure about are annual passes. Disney hates them.
 

Raxel7851

Member
We just returned from a 10 day Disney stay. 3 at FW in our small RV and 7 at the Contemporary. We felt very safe with Disney’s virus protocols. However, with the MK closing at 6, and Epcot and HS closing at 7, plus no park hopping, I think we’re close to canceling our December trip. We’ll wait another month or so to see if things return more towards “normal”. The parks weren’t too bad Tues-Thur, but packed the rest of the days. They are extending operating hours a little on weekends. It was frustrating waiting 45-60 mins for a lot of the more popular attractions. But once again, we did feel very safe in the Disney environment.
 

_caleb

Well-Known Member
But when you cancel a ticket, unless you buy individual park tickets for each person for each day (sixteen tickets in your exsmple) which would be very expensive even when you end up keeping only four tickets per person... Then your scheme might work. But your paying a premium for multiple one day tickets. And you won’t have total flexibility because you have to cancel the undesired tickets several days in advance. So unless you want to gamble on same day reservations, it’ll cost you. And if you’re the gambling type, going through all this work is a waste of time anyway.
Sounds like the system is well designed and shouldn’t be “gamable.” Thats good.

What is the cancellation policy in regard to reservations? You mentioned that it must be done several days in advance- any idea how far in advance before you’re stuck with a reservation? Is the ticket cancelled as soon as you don’t make your reservation?
 

EngineerMom

Active Member
We have really gotten used to park hopping. As folks said we like going to dinner at Epcot more than once. We have definitely done 3 parks in 1 day. Last trip when most of our group wanted a mid day break DH and I went to Epcot to walk the countries and get a snack. We had already been to the Studios and we were going to Magic Kingdom that afternoon.
 

nickys

Premium Member
But when you cancel a ticket, unless you buy individual park tickets for each person for each day (sixteen tickets in your exsmple) which would be very expensive even when you end up keeping only four tickets per person... Then your scheme might work. But your paying a premium for multiple one day tickets. And you won’t have total flexibility because you have to cancel the undesired tickets several days in advance. So unless you want to gamble on same day reservations, it’ll cost you. And if you’re the gambling type, going through all this work is a waste of time anyway.

If people wanted to do it, they would presumably buy two multi-day tickets per person. Yes it’s a big outlay which is why very very few people will bother doing it. But it would probably work and you’d get your money back on the second one or keep it and put it towards the cost of a ticket for your next trip.

To be clear, this won’t allow you to go to more than one park a day, but it will allow you to reserve more than one park a day and decide that day which one to keep.

However, before anyone accuses me of advocating it, let me point out that for it to work you would need to take extra convoluted steps for each person, which would be even more complicated with the reservation system in place.

Sounds like the system is well designed and shouldn’t be “gamable.” Thats good.

What is the cancellation policy in regard to reservations? You mentioned that it must be done several days in advance- any idea how far in advance before you’re stuck with a reservation? Is the ticket cancelled as soon as you don’t make your reservation?
There is in theory a penalty for an AP no show - three no shows and you’re barred from making further reservations for something like 10 days. Whether they are doing that I don’t know.

The same may well apply to a regular ticket too.

But ,AFAIK, the ticket isn’t cancelled if you don’t go. I have seen trip reports where they just didn’t go to a park on their first day because they were tired, so they stayed at the resort. It’s just a no-show, the ticket remains valid, their remaining park reservations were fine. Whether or not they cancelled the reservation I don’t know, but they only decided that day. So no advance decisions are needed. And because those tickets were extended ones they have an extra unused day on those tickets to use next time (the normal expiry rules are not being applied right now).

And you can change park reservations on the day too.
 
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nickys

Premium Member
I don’t think that will work at this time. Once you make a park reservation for a ticket for a given day, you are locked out of any other park reservations for a given day at this time. While you think that’s dumb and ridiculous, that is the current system.

I tried. Doesn’t work.
That would need to be changed, but it’s not a massive change. I would bet the coding is there but turned off.
 

_caleb

Well-Known Member
If people wanted to do it, they would presumably buy two multi-day tickets per person. Yes it’s a big outlay which is why very very few people will bother doing it. But it would probably work and you’d get your money back on the second one or keep it and put it towards the cost of a ticket for your next trip.

To be clear, this won’t allow you to go to more than one park a day, but it will allow you to reserve more than one park a day and decide that day which one to keep.

However, before anyone accuses me of advocating it, let me point out that for it to work you would need to take extra convoluted steps for each person, which would be even more complicated with the reservation system in place.


There is in theory a penalty for an AP no show - three no shows and you’re barred from making further reservations for something like 10 days. Whether they are doing that I don’t know.

The same may well apply to a regular ticket too.

But ,AFAIK, the ticket isn’t cancelled if you don’t go. I have seen trip reports where they just didn’t go to a park on their first day because they were tired, so they stayed at the resort. It’s just a no-show, the ticket remains valid, their remaining park reservations were fine. Whether or not they cancelled the reservation I don’t know, but they only decided that day. So no advance decisions are needed. And because those tickets were extended ones they have an extra unused day on those tickets to use next time (the normal expiry rules are not being applied right now).

And you can change park reservations on the day too.
Thanks. This is helpful. I wasn’t sure how it all worked with the new reservation system.

For anyone who might be skeptical that a significant number of guests would put up lots of money just to game the system or try to save money, please check out all the ”Disney hacks” sites out there. LOTS of people put up LOTS of money to game the system to their benefit, whether it’s for ADRS, resort stays, APs, DVC, credit card points, gift card discounts, Extra Magic Hours, FastPass, DDP, etc.
 

Fable McCloud

Well-Known Member
I agree with the sentiments that we will see a return of Park Hopping once things quiet down and start to return back to normal. Disney likes to give people the option so they can dine in various places, and they would limit a lot of the people spending money if they don't bring back that option.
 

wdw71fan

Well-Known Member
Parks Pass will be gone before you know it. Just because there currently timeframes that are reserved, doesn't mean you'll necessarily need them.
 

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