Politics Reopening Rally to Be Held Outside Disneyland on Saturday, October 17th

This thread contains political discussion related to the original thread topic

Disney Irish

Well-Known Member
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My point is I do care; however, we also have to support the places that are open or they will also close their doors. We can't simply go to a protest to do our part.
Which again proves my point even more.
 

el_super

Well-Known Member
I think turn out was so low that the people who organized this probably didnt mind the recall group showing up.

As for why CMs wouldnt go, I'm sure most of them have moved on to looking for other work than bothering to want to work for Disney ever again. Time is better spent filling out applications than convincing the governor to open your old workplace that fired you.

I think there's probably a lot of truth to this. As a consequence of keeping wages low, employees don't end up feeling tied to their employer. I know quite a few DL CMs who ended up getting work in the grocery industry (obviously) at the start of the pandemic when that sector was furiously hiring. Those jobs typically paid more than Disney too. They've stayed on furlough status with Disney, but aren't as dependent as a lot of folks seem to think on whether they come back or not. So that segment of CMs that absolutely were dependent on Disney income have probably moved on.

Additionally, and again as a result of wages being pretty low and targeting specific demographics (entry level/college aged kids/retirees), there was a large segment of DL CMs who were using DLR just as a supplemental income. Kids staying at home living with their parents or retirees collecting a pension and just looking for something to do. The end result is a lot of folks who work for Disney, but don't feel desperately tied to the job.

Maybe that's why you don't see a lot of CMs organizing rallies and asking for the park to reopen: they just don't care.
 

DavidDL

Well-Known Member
Is Disneyland considered low pay? I guess for what it costs to live in CA, I can see that. But I've always thought the $15-$16 per hour starting point was pretty generous when it was introduced well before it became more commonplace in the state (now places like Target, etc. do it). When I was fired from the resort for focusing too much time on my college studies and trying to graduate with a degree in animation, I wasn't making very much in the parks so I felt the trade-off would be worth it. However, when I was hired as a VFX artist, I was only given $13/hour right as Disney started to announce the $15/hour minimum. Suddenly taking a job decorating cupcakes in the park didn't seem so bad by comparison. I think the issue is trying to get that full-time position in the parks. I don't think the resort's starting pay is "bad" (-and it goes up with seniority) but it's definitely doesn't matter what you're making if you're only getting 12 to 20 hours a week.

In any case, what were we talking about? Oh yeah, what a sad turn out this past weekend. I don't think the recall people did any favors for anyone else who showed up, or was thinking about doing so, regardless of how one feels about that issue.
 

cmwade77

Well-Known Member
Is Disneyland considered low pay? I guess for what it costs to live in CA, I can see that. But I've always thought the $15-$16 per hour starting point was pretty generous when it was introduced well before it became more commonplace in the state (now places like Target, etc. do it). When I was fired from the resort for focusing too much time on my college studies and trying to graduate with a degree in animation, I wasn't making very much in the parks so I felt the trade-off would be worth it. However, when I was hired as a VFX artist, I was only given $13/hour right as Disney started to announce the $15/hour minimum. Suddenly taking a job decorating cupcakes in the park didn't seem so bad by comparison. I think the issue is trying to get that full-time position in the parks. I don't think the resort's starting pay is "bad" (-and it goes up with seniority) but it's definitely doesn't matter what you're making if you're only getting 12 to 20 hours a week.

In any case, what were we talking about? Oh yeah, what a sad turn out this past weekend. I don't think the recall people did any favors for anyone else who showed up, or was thinking about doing so, regardless of how one feels about that issue.
Well, no matter what has done it, it appears that reopening guidelines are allegedly coming out tomorrow (I will believe it when I see it)
 

cmwade77

Well-Known Member
As for the trial, there is a bit more information here:

As you can read, if the fourth outcome is the ruling, the entire state of emergency disappears. Of course, if that did happen Newsom would likely file for a stay of ruling while he files an appeal and that may or may not be granted, but it will make for an interesting couple of weeks, that's for sure.

And likely he is going to try to somehow use the theme park guidelines as leverage for a defense in this trial. The timing is too suspicious, of course the fact that the unions sent him a letter today saying that Disneyland should be able to reopen is also a factor, I am sure, as he does give in to the unions A LOT.
 

DanielBB8

Well-Known Member
Is Disneyland considered low pay? I guess for what it costs to live in CA, I can see that. But I've always thought the $15-$16 per hour starting point was pretty generous when it was introduced well before it became more commonplace in the state (now places like Target, etc. do it). When I was fired from the resort for focusing too much time on my college studies and trying to graduate with a degree in animation, I wasn't making very much in the parks so I felt the trade-off would be worth it. However, when I was hired as a VFX artist, I was only given $13/hour right as Disney started to announce the $15/hour minimum. Suddenly taking a job decorating cupcakes in the park didn't seem so bad by comparison. I think the issue is trying to get that full-time position in the parks. I don't think the resort's starting pay is "bad" (-and it goes up with seniority) but it's definitely doesn't matter what you're making if you're only getting 12 to 20 hours a week.

In any case, what were we talking about? Oh yeah, what a sad turn out this past weekend. I don't think the recall people did any favors for anyone else who showed up, or was thinking about doing so, regardless of how one feels about that issue.
It's low when professional jobs can easily start double or triple the amount. It's even lower when you realize those starting wages are not guaranteed full time jobs. You're always working on the clock for 15 to 20 hours per week and getting basic benefits that are practically worthless. There's no chance for advancement and lateral transfers are nonexistent. This is what happens when you're working in an unskilled job. They just order you around without a lot of respect. Your foot is always half way out the door. Management hasn't decided if they're ready to fire you to replace you or demote you to keep you around for cheaper hourly wages. I haven't done this type of job since college many years ago.
This is devastating for people who don't have skills. They need something even if it's to kill time. It does trickle up to salary jobs, which aren't much more stable in the hospitality industry. They have punishing hours since upper management can abuse salary workers who are not paid overtime. They can easily work 60 to 70 hours per week. The dirty work never ends. And salary managers always fill in when cheap hourly workers decide to not show up, which happens a lot when they aren't treated well.
 

cmwade77

Well-Known Member
It's low when professional jobs can easily start double or triple the amount. It's even lower when you realize those starting wages are not guaranteed full time jobs. You're always working on the clock for 15 to 20 hours per week and getting basic benefits that are practically worthless. There's no chance for advancement and lateral transfers are nonexistent. This is what happens when you're working in an unskilled job. They just order you around without a lot of respect. Your foot is always half way out the door. Management hasn't decided if they're ready to fire you to replace you or demote you to keep you around for cheaper hourly wages. I haven't done this type of job since college many years ago.
This is devastating for people who don't have skills. They need something even if it's to kill time. It does trickle up to salary jobs, which aren't much more stable in the hospitality industry. They have punishing hours since upper management can abuse salary workers who are not paid overtime. They can easily work 60 to 70 hours per week. The dirty work never ends. And salary managers always fill in when cheap hourly workers decide to not show up, which happens a lot when they aren't treated well.
Well, California have been cracking down on companies that have been considering certain salaried positions as "exempt" when they really shouldn't be. As for the hourly workers, you are right to a point; however, there are unskilled labor and well, skilled labor should indeed make more for obvious reasons.
 

spock8113

Active Member
California Confirmed 878,346 +1,797Today Deaths 16,979 They've talked a second wave, but that is yet to fully materialize.
Disney knew before all of us like when they saw COVID coming on March 12th from their China parks and just shut everything down.
It all comes back to liability and the expense of operating a marginal park with maximum safety.
I don't need to ride the Haunted Mansion that bad, just ask Mr. Toad at DisneyWorld.
 

DanielBB8

Well-Known Member
Well, California have been cracking down on companies that have been considering certain salaried positions as "exempt" when they really shouldn't be. As for the hourly workers, you are right to a point; however, there are unskilled labor and well, skilled labor should indeed make more for obvious reasons.
Since I wasn’t talking about the skilled hourly workers like plumbers, electricians, carpenters, and cooks, the remaining are mostly working retail, restaurants, and attractions that require no skill or training and subject to minimum wages.
 

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