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NY Times: Bob Iger Effectively Back As CEO

tcool123

Well-Known Member
Right, but what about anvils dropping on cartoon characters?
I think it also has to do with the type of cartoons? Given Lilo is a human character and the film is set in Hawaii it makes it more "real". On the other hand cartoons with anvils usually require a larger suspension of disbelief, and thus get a pass?
 

Magicart87

〝𝘙𝘪𝘨𝘩𝘵𝘺-𝘖!〞
Premium Member
A bit OT but it's worth noting (and commendable) that the artists completely changed Lilo and Stitch prior to theatrical release due to scene similarities to the events on 9/11.

See here:
This new washer/dryer change while disappointing to some is also a change for the better, IMO though perhaps not handled as well.

The removal of the entire scene might have been the better solution. Changing the scene to something other than a laundry room would have also worked. While the artists managed to address the larger "kid in a dryer" problem; the result is a bit jarring. Personally (as if I were heading up this change) I would have made this new table a different color, possibly sage green. To that, I would have replaced the pizza box door with a rod and curtain while also replacing the top of the "table" with a counter top faucet and basin ultimately changing the entire space into a sink and vanity. Lastly, I would have added a previous shot or edited the window in the scene to show an outdoor clothesline to wrap up any remaining loose ends. Hindsight and opinions and all.

The biggest issue with this scene change: Random pizza box door.
 
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MisterPenguin

Rumormonger
Premium Member
Why is there a need to censor these films? We don’t live in frickin’ China.

It wasn't censored. The government had nothing to do with the change. First Amendment rights of Free Speech have nothing to do with self-restraint or social peer pressure... it only applies to restrict the U.S. (and later, by extension to the States and local governments) from silencing free speech... which isn't absolute: you can't use "free speech" to plan to commit crimes or cause harm, like yelling 'fire!' in a crowded theater.

The original artist (i.e., Disney) voluntarily made the change when they realized that kids dying in driers was a thing that they didn't want to be associated with.

So, don't worry, we're not in China.
 

WDWTank

Well-Known Member
It wasn't censored. The government had nothing to do with the change. First Amendment rights of Free Speech have nothing to do with self-restraint or social peer pressure... it only applies to restrict the U.S. (and later, by extension to the States and local governments) from silencing free speech... which isn't absolute: you can't use "free speech" to plan to commit crimes or cause harm, like yelling 'fire!' in a crowded theater.

The original artist (i.e., Disney) voluntarily made the change when they realized that kids dying in driers was a thing that they didn't want to be associated with.

So, don't worry, we're not in China.
Ok thanks :) and by the way, I know about the first amendment. :)
 

WDWTank

Well-Known Member
It wasn't censored. The government had nothing to do with the change. First Amendment rights of Free Speech have nothing to do with self-restraint or social peer pressure... it only applies to restrict the U.S. (and later, by extension to the States and local governments) from silencing free speech... which isn't absolute: you can't use "free speech" to plan to commit crimes or cause harm, like yelling 'fire!' in a crowded theater.

The original artist (i.e., Disney) voluntarily made the change when they realized that kids dying in driers was a thing that they didn't want to be associated with.

So, don't worry, we're not in China.
When did the change occur?
 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
Right, but what about anvils dropping on cartoon characters?
You'll find very few kids strong enough to drop an anvil on someones head nor dumb enough to play along a 100' cliff or ones that don't know they difference between a human and a coyote or a road runner. Children are not as stupid as we give them credit for. However, climbing into a front loading dryer, is quite a different thing and more then likely to be a problem if kids see one of there favorites doing so successfully.
 

WDWTank

Well-Known Member
You'll find very few kids strong enough to drop an anvil on someones head nor dumb enough to play along a 100' cliff or ones that don't know they difference between a human and a coyote or a road runner. Children are not as stupid as we give them credit for. However, climbing into a front loading dryer, is quite a different thing and more then likely to be a problem if kids see one of there favorites doing so successfully.
I guess that’s why some smaller children get stuck in claw machines, they saw Buzz Lightyear do it in Toy Story.
 

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