News New Crêperie restaurant coming to Epcot's France Pavilion as part of Ratatouille expansion

NiarrNDisney

Well-Known Member
Maybe the designer who did this sign also made the creperie one! (It’s all really “Six Flags!”)View attachment 495692
I think you have got your point across unless it is your intention to continue to:
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castlecake2.0

Well-Known Member
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Is there any indication of plans to clean up/hide some of the backstage areas visible from the Skyliner when this is all done? I know it’s impossible to hide everything, but maybe some trees or something could help. Also maybe class up the CM bus stop back there.
 

MisterPenguin

Rumormonger
Premium Member
Here's a creperie in the heart of Paris, Paris Beauborg:

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Notice the art nouveau font for 'Pizza Club' hearkening back to the pizza clubs of Paris of the late 1800's.



Cooper Black is très chic! Also, what is the translation into English for "take away"?

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And just like Disney, long line and a punny name:

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I'm beginning to think these are all mostly tourist traps. But, so's Epcot.

There's a lot less of them outside the central part of Paris. Here's one in a town outside of Paris...

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aladdin2007

Well-Known Member
Definitely prefer the real buildings to the concept art, but I’d probably prefer the signage from the concept.

Agree, I think its coming along nicer than that bland generic concept art, Im sure there are some more details and touches to be added but its looking better than I expected.
 

Walt d

Well-Known Member
Are we looking at the same artwork because I just don’t see how horrible this is ?
I have tried the french pastry their custard filled long jonhs, and was very, very. Disappointed. There is a place near me that makes amazing filled longjohns. That would put the French bakery there to tears. And there crapes are probably not very good also. They need to get me to show them how it’s really done. In America.,the chefs would cry. To my great recipe refined over 30 years. Made you would beg me for my recipe Frenchie.eat my crapes!
 

jaxonp

Well-Known Member
I have tried the french pastry their custard filled long jonhs, and was very, very. Disappointed. There is a place near me that makes amazing filled longjohns. That would put the French bakery there to tears. And there crapes are probably not very good also. They need to get me to show them how it’s really done. In America.,the chefs would cry. To my great recipe refined over 30 years. Made you would beg me for my recipe Frenchie.eat my crapes!

not be fair, you can’t find good stuff like that outside France. It’s truly an art form there.
 

tirian

Well-Known Member
La Crêperie de Paris photos from September 8

It’s a box with windows glued onto it, just like Via Napoli in the Italy pavilion.

Edit: a Disney theme park isn’t supposed to be exactly like real life. WDI legends referred to their style as the “architecture of reassurance”; the scale and detail make the parks feel welcoming and better than reality, and in the ‘90s they differentiated between “Disney scale” and Universal’s full-scale buildings.
 
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Bocabear

Well-Known Member
While Via Napoli would look better with some depth to the windows, adding some sort of an attraction to Italy would be even better... Busch Gardens already took Roman Rapids, Escape From Pompeii and DaVinci's Garden of Inventions...I am sure Disney could figure out something that wasn't a retooling of Chester and Hester...lol
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
Edit: a Disney theme park isn’t supposed to be exactly like real life. WDI legends referred to their style as the “architecture of reassurance”; the scale and detail make the parks feel welcoming and better than reality, and in the ‘90s they differentiated between “Disney scale” and Universal’s full-scale buildings.
Scale is a concept that has come to be thoroughly misunderstood. The notion of "full scale" and "reduced scale" is distilled into a manner that is rather nonsensical. There is no such thing as "full scale". We now have certain minimum and occasional maximum dimensional criteria in building, fire and accessibility codes but they don't really define a scale. The popular notion of a "floor" being 10' floor-to-floor is not actually a set definition, being more related to residential occupancies (houses, but also apartments and hotels). Some zoning codes will limit the size of a floor in an attempt to regulate scale, but they're not conforming to any widely held standard.

Scale is ultimately related to the human form. It's all relative. It's not that Disney or Universal ever used any particular "scale," both have employed different scales for differing effects. While the facades of Universal Studios Florida are generally taller than those at Disney's Hollywood Studios, both employ tricks to make things look better and in some ways Disney falls short by being overly diminutive creating a facade that could not actually be habitable. Main Street, USA at Disneyland is often described as being at specific "scales" but this is not quite so with City Hall and the Fire Station having occupied second floors.

The expansion to the France Pavilion is a great example how this focus on being "smaller" can be misunderstood and distorted. There is this obsessive commitment to the three floors of the front of the pavilion, which results in the off-level door in the Blue facade because the floor-to-floor heights implied by the scenic facades is really tall, taller than the actual floors in the building. Then the crêperie is too small to convincingly read as two floors, falling into this trap that just being smaller constitutes a forced perspective. The two now sit there together, contradicting each other such that their bizarre scale will be made more apparent.
 
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tirian

Well-Known Member
Scale is a concept that has come to be thoroughly misunderstood. The notion of "full scale" and "reduced scale" is distilled into a manner that is rather nonsensical. There is no such thing as "full scale". We now have certain minimum and occasional maximum dimensional criteria in building, fire and accessibility codes but they don't really define a scale. The popular notion of a "floor" being 10' floor-to-floor is not actually a set definition, being more related to residential occupancies (houses, but also apartments and hotels). Some zoning codes will limit the size of a floor in an attempt to regulate scale, but they're not conforming to any widely held standard.

Scale is ultimately related to the human form. It's all relative. It's not that Disney or Universal ever used any particular "scale," both have employed different scales for differing effects. While the facades of Universal Studios Florida are generally taller than those at Disney's Hollywood Studios, both employ tricks to make things look better and in some ways Disney falls short by being overly diminutive creating a facade that could not actually be habitable. Main Street, USA at Disneyland is often described as being at specific "scales" but this is not quite so with City Hall and the Fire Station having occupied second floors.

The expansion to the France Pavilion is a great example how this focus on being "smaller" can be misunderstood and distorted. There is this obsessive commitment to the three floors of the front of the pavilion, which results in the off-level door in the Blue facade because the floor-to-floor heights implied by the scenic facades is really tall, taller than the actual floors in the building. Then the crêperie is too small to convincingly read as two floors, falling into this trap that just being smaller constitutes a forced perspective. The two now sit there together, contradicting each other such that their bizarre scale will be made more apparent.
I agree, and since I didn’t have time to type all that out, I appreciate the details you added! I mean it.

So yeah. All this. ^^^ :)

Let’s be honest: any theme park enthusiast could see that WDI had lost its edge when New FL opened with a bizarre mishmash of misunderstood forced perspectives and façades slapped next to one another. The transition from FL to Liberty Square is a far superior blend of architectural styles and scales—at least, it was before Rapunzel’s squirrel treehouse was added.

In a reverse way, California’s SWGE clashes with all of Disneyland.

I can hear alleged fanboys saying they don’t care about the crêperie and Rat façades as long as the crêpes and ride are good. Okay. But then you’re tossing aside some of the standards that set Disney apart; and you don’t need a Disney theme park, just a local amusement park.
 
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MansionButler84

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
While Via Napoli would look better with some depth to the windows, adding some sort of an attraction to Italy would be even better... Busch Gardens already took Roman Rapids, Escape From Pompeii and DaVinci's Garden of Inventions...I am sure Disney could figure out something that wasn't a retooling of Chester and Hester...lol
The Coachman’s Pleasure Island with Pinocchio and Friends CONFIRMED!
 
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