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Modifying for vegetarians?

AugieMorosco

New Member
Original Poster
We are taking our first WDW trip in July. We are both vegetarian and I am curious if modifying QS meals through the app is an option. For example, we have an ADR at BOG for breakfast. If we wanted to place an order for Feast A La Gaston, but without any meat, could that be done through the MDE app mobile ordering?

We also have ADRs for Garden Grill and Storybook Dining. Is it easy to request vegetarian for prix-fixe meals with the server or should I do this in advance somehow? I'd like to not be a headache for any cast members.
 

StarWarsGirl

Well-Known Member
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You can always call dining and see if they'll note on your reservations that you're a vegetarian. It should not be too difficult; Disney is a master with dealing with dietary needs for different people. CMs hear about food allergies, vegans, gluten-free diets, etc, all the time.

For mobile ordering, entrees that are vegan are marked accordingly; however, if you have any concerns, you should go talk to a CM at the location.
 

figmentfan423

Well-Known Member
Welcome aboard @AugieMorosco! I'm a full on vegan and modifying on mobile order isn't doable as of now but @StarWarsGirl is correct most vegan dishes are marked accordingly. Now for the good news Disney does a great job as I'm full on vegan and gf and never went hungry. That being said GG was by far my least favorite experience!!!!!! In EPCOT Tangerine Café, Sunshine Seasons, Rose and Crown and Spice Road Table were my favorites ps feel free to PM me with any questions
Paging @bee
 
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dreamfinder

Well-Known Member
As a PP said, any menu choices available for dietary restrictions are flagged directly in MDE, but there are no options to modify beyond basics like dressing on top or on side. Disney is good with modifying meals. Unless you have a lot of dietary needs, IE multiple food allergies, or some that are really rare, they won't be able to help you in advance. Pretty much every TS location will have at least one option to meet all the major dietary needs, some have several. I've done plenty of trips as a vegetarian, and the only place I got a cop out meal was at the predecessor to Monsieur Paul (several veggie side dishes was all they offered).
 

Phonedave

Well-Known Member
I would ask about garden grill.

I don't know if you eat fish or not, and if you avoid things such as dairy in baked goods, but depending on how strict you are, GG could end up being salad and green beans for you. I don't know if they offer meatless protein option or not, but you may want to check ahead of time.
 
Hey! For BOG I usually pre-order the croque monsieur and when I get there tell them I want it without ham. (This way you still go through the pre-order line) Garden Grill they will bring you out a vegetarian skillet if you ask when you order (much of the same food but they do a meatless loaf) and while I havent been I have seen that they have vegetarian starters for Storybook dining so it should be the same thing to just tell your server when ordering.
 

AugieMorosco

New Member
Original Poster
Hey! For BOG I usually pre-order the croque monsieur and when I get there tell them I want it without ham. (This way you still go through the pre-order line) Garden Grill they will bring you out a vegetarian skillet if you ask when you order (much of the same food but they do a meatless loaf) and while I havent been I have seen that they have vegetarian starters for Storybook dining so it should be the same thing to just tell your server when ordering.
Thanks. The vegetarian starters at Storybook seem to be the favorites, so hopefully they double up on those!
 

Qscout

New Member
Check out vegandisneyworld.com, it isnt all vegan offers good advice on vegetarian as well. It lists all eating locations and details the meat free options, many of them aren't advertised on the menu boards. I am looking forward to our upcoming trip way more than the last time with the knowledge of everywhere we can eat.

Especially now I know you can get a meat free dog from Caseys corner, and meat free bangers and mash or meat free fish and chips at the rose and crown.

The problem is we now have too big an choice and the list of places we must eat is getting longer than the number of days we are there.

You can't make amendments through ordering food on the MDE app, but it does list all the allergy friendly options, so if anyone is vegan can select the dairy/egg free option.
 
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Shouldigo12

Well-Known Member
...I don't know if you eat fish or not, and if you avoid things such as dairy in baked goods...
Fun fact of the day! Vegetarians are the ones who don't eat any meat products, such as bacon or chicken. Vegans are the ones who don't eat any animal product, such as milk or eggs (including meat). Pescetarians don't eat meat products, except for fish. A lot of people think all of those diets are basically the same, but they're all a little different in what they choose to cut out.
 

AugieMorosco

New Member
Original Poster
Accurate, but I've discovered many people misidentify themselves. I've encountered self proclaimed vegetarians who "only eat fish". I am vegetarian, but not vegan. I do my best to avoid any animal products and buy ethically sourced eggs, etc. There are times when I don't realize something like refried beans have animal fat in them, but I don't freak out. I assume Phonedave was not sure if I was identifying myself properly.
 

Phonedave

Well-Known Member
Fun fact of the day! Vegetarians are the ones who don't eat any meat products, such as bacon or chicken. Vegans are the ones who don't eat any animal product, such as milk or eggs (including meat). Pescetarians don't eat meat products, except for fish. A lot of people think all of those diets are basically the same, but they're all a little different in what they choose to cut out.
While those are the 'official' definitions, there are many people who call themselves vegetarians, but eat fish. I am familiar with the differences (having two close pescatarian family members, one who is allergic to shellfish as well).

I always ask, because people don't always use the terms in their exact definitions.
 

Phonedave

Well-Known Member
Accurate, but I've discovered many people misidentify themselves. I've encountered self proclaimed vegetarians who "only eat fish". I am vegetarian, but not vegan. I do my best to avoid any animal products and buy ethically sourced eggs, etc. There are times when I don't realize something like refried beans have animal fat in them, but I don't freak out. I assume Phonedave was not sure if I was identifying myself properly.
Thanks, that was it exactly.
 

jaklgreen

Well-Known Member
Accurate, but I've discovered many people misidentify themselves. I've encountered self proclaimed vegetarians who "only eat fish". I am vegetarian, but not vegan. I do my best to avoid any animal products and buy ethically sourced eggs, etc. There are times when I don't realize something like refried beans have animal fat in them, but I don't freak out. I assume Phonedave was not sure if I was identifying myself properly.
I work in food and we see this all the time. For example, our tomato soup has chicken stock in it and "vegetarians" will come in and ask if the soup is vegetarian and we say "no" and tell them it has chicken stock in it. So many people say "that's ok. I just don't want to eat meat". That is just one example of the many, many vegetarian/vegan weirdness that goes on. It is like many decide on the spot that they will eat meat that day because the food sounds good to them. Which is there choice of course, but not until after they hold up the line making you go through every single menu item's ingredients.
 

Shouldigo12

Well-Known Member
I work in food and we see this all the time. For example, our tomato soup has chicken stock in it and "vegetarians" will come in and ask if the soup is vegetarian and we say "no" and tell them it has chicken stock in it. So many people say "that's ok. I just don't want to eat meat". That is just one example of the many, many vegetarian/vegan weirdness that goes on. It is like many decide on the spot that they will eat meat that day because the food sounds good to them. Which is there choice of course, but not until after they hold up the line making you go through every single menu item's ingredients.
Or like people who insist on a gluten free meal and then order beer. :cautious:
 

AugieMorosco

New Member
Original Poster
I work in food and we see this all the time. For example, our tomato soup has chicken stock in it and "vegetarians" will come in and ask if the soup is vegetarian and we say "no" and tell them it has chicken stock in it. So many people say "that's ok. I just don't want to eat meat". That is just one example of the many, many vegetarian/vegan weirdness that goes on. It is like many decide on the spot that they will eat meat that day because the food sounds good to them. Which is there choice of course, but not until after they hold up the line making you go through every single menu item's ingredients.
I try to have backup plans and ask the right questions. If I'm in that predicament my decision usually comes down to what other options I have, how hungry I am, and how much it's going to inconvenience someone else. After 10+ years, I've gotten pretty good at recognizing what probably does and doesn't contain meat products. My goal is minimizing impact. It drives me crazy when I order something like a salad with no chicken and it comes with chicken. First thing I ask is if someone else can eat it in the kitchen or will it get thrown away. If it's getting thrown away, it makes it worse than if I'd eaten it! Usually I can find a resolution where it's eaten by someone.
 

jaklgreen

Well-Known Member
Or like people who insist on a gluten free meal and then order beer. :cautious:
OMG I have a story about that. I was at the F&WF a couple of years ago doing the Hibachi Experience. This is one of the best event that they have. It is limited to a total of 16 people and they only have the event a few times a year. They spend months on the menu, making this 5+ course event with authentic Japanese food and hospitality. It is not cheap(almost $200 now). Well a couple of years ago while we were in the waiting area for them to take us back, they came out to double check on people's special dietary needs. Which is really kind of a big PITA for them since it is a specific, cooked in front of you, special menu. But of course, they are more then happy to work around actual needs. Well this lady tells them that she can not have carbs. They go over the menu with her and she said that everything was fine then she orders a beer. I am sitting right next to her and say, "you know there are carbs in beer". She said, "oh, yeah, I know. I just thought they were going to give us a bunch of rice and wanted to save my carb consumption for beer". WHAT? I kind of lost it and told her how rude that was and that the special needs is for those who actually NEED to have the menu changed, not because you are counting your carbs. I normally do not say anything to people, but the audacity of this woman wanting them to change this special meal, just for her, and just to cut out a bit of rice is beyond anything my brain could handle that day.
 

jaklgreen

Well-Known Member
I try to have backup plans and ask the right questions. If I'm in that predicament my decision usually comes down to what other options I have, how hungry I am, and how much it's going to inconvenience someone else. After 10+ years, I've gotten pretty good at recognizing what probably does and doesn't contain meat products. My goal is minimizing impact. It drives me crazy when I order something like a salad with no chicken and it comes with chicken. First thing I ask is if someone else can eat it in the kitchen or will it get thrown away. If it's getting thrown away, it makes it worse than if I'd eaten it! Usually I can find a resolution where it's eaten by someone.
Once it has left the kitchen and at the table with the customer, food laws do not allow us to "reuse" it. It has to be thrown away. We try very, very hard to not make those kind of mistakes. We are a small cafe and usually do not have many of these errors, but they do happen. I guess what I was getting at was, I thought that you are either a vegetarian/vegan or your are not. But it turns out that many are only partially vegetarian/vegan. They seem to pick and choose what day/meal they are going to be one. And it is usually those "fair weather" vegetarians that make the most noise about wanting vegetarian food, but then end up eating something with meat product in it.
 
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