• Welcome to the WDWMAGIC.COM Forums!
    Please take a look around, and feel free to sign up and join the community.You can use your Twitter or Facebook account to sign up, or register directly.

Mandatory “Room Check” - Take the poll...

Do you agree with the mandatory room inspection every 24 hours?


  • Total voters
    278

LAKid53

The wand chooses the wizard, Mr. Potter
Premium Member
Oh I'm sure they're required to knock before entering any room, even if there's no sign. It doesn't sound like you care that much, but I have a friend who runs in the fall half-marathon - Wine and Dine? - and she said she was able to request a time for housekeeping that fit her schedule.

I was afraid your "95%" comment would be interpreted by some to mean that Disney does not care at all about the Room Occupied sign, which I don't think is the case. It doesn't take much to set some people off on this topic.
Then some need reading skills. My 95% comment was that for most of the visits, I was in the room and didn't find it an issue.

Yes, it's the W&D Half in November. I do all three races that weekend, hence the getting up at 2:30 AM 3 mornings in a row to be on the bus to the starting area. I'll be there in 13 days for the Princess Half. Will certainly check if I can have Housekeeping schedule the check around 9AM. That way, when I get back to my room after the races, they've done their thing.
 

celluloid

Well-Known Member
Advertisement
Like most(some say all) security, it is not much comfort to me and is more of a nussance in this case than a comfort/safety. I don't think someone needs 24 hours to do something bad or hurtful to others.
 

Master Yoda

Pro Star Wars geek.
Premium Member
Exactly what are they looking for when they do a security room check? Is there a history of people plotting to do harm in WDW or is this just an over reaction on WDW part. Do they check every car that drives into WDW don't think so. Personally i would rather have my privacy then some false sense of security
The reasoning stems from the Las Vegas shooting where Stephen Paddock was able to move an arsenal of weapons into a room over the course of 4 days without anyone knowing.

Mandalay Bay is currently being sued by a number of the victims saying that they were liable for the shooting. In an odd twist, MGM is suing the victims of the shooting in an attempt to have the suits dismissed.


Because of this many resorts nationwide have instituted some kind of random room check policy. The thought is that instituting a policy of random checks will limit their legal liability should something like this happen again. Disney is just following suit most likely at the behest of their legal department.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/las-vegas-shooting-hotels-revise-room-security-measures/
 

Chi84

Well-Known Member
One potential threat that we know about. In any event, I heard that the room checks were more about keeping human traffickers from setting up shop on Disney property. It's a big problem in the Orlando area. No one knows for certain why Disney started doing the room checks.
 

flynnibus

Well-Known Member
In any event, I heard that the room checks were more about keeping human traffickers from setting up shop on Disney property
Why would they bother with hotels that cost 2x as much as hotels that are just nearby, more accessible, and with more flexible availability?

That is a trend in the hotel industry - but overpriced, isolated properties like WDW really shouldn't have that problem.
 

Master Yoda

Pro Star Wars geek.
Premium Member
Why would they bother with hotels that cost 2x as much as hotels that are just nearby, more accessible, and with more flexible availability?

That is a trend in the hotel industry - but overpriced, isolated properties like WDW really shouldn't have that problem.
Because nobody expects them to be in hotels that cost twice as much.

You would be surprised at the number of times drug dealers spend the extra coin to set up shop in a nice neighborhood where no one expects them to be.

In spite of that, it is not about what is realistic. It is about limiting liability. Performing the room checks covers a wide array of possibilities and limits the liability of Disney should someone be concealing something illegal in one of their resorts.
 

flynnibus

Well-Known Member
Because nobody expects them to be in hotels that cost twice as much.

You would be surprised at the number of times drug dealers spend the extra coin to set up shop in a nice neighborhood where no one expects them to be.
But price isn't the only thing here... it's accessibility, proximity, etc. If your business is bringing Johns in... you don't setup shop where Johns can't get to. Especially when you can 'hide in nice hotels' just around the corner for less money and none of the access problems.
 

Chi84

Well-Known Member
But price isn't the only thing here... it's accessibility, proximity, etc. If your business is bringing Johns in... you don't setup shop where Johns can't get to. Especially when you can 'hide in nice hotels' just around the corner for less money and none of the access problems.
What do you mean by access problems? Currently, can't anyone just take an Uber to Disney Springs and then access any of the resorts by walkway, boat or bus? Many years ago when the Key to the World cards first came out, the bus drivers/boat operators would ask to see one per family, but no one checks anymore. I know what you mean about Disney seeming to be an unlikely place for that type of criminal activity - I just saw that given as a possible reason when the room checks first started.
 

Maelstrom Troll

Well-Known Member
I know the question has been answered but the flip lock was accidentally activated when we left our room at Caribbean Beach by the drapes. I was able to jimmy it open with a palm frond from the landscaping (shhhhh it took a few ;) ).

As for the room checks, I am really skeptical. A large suitcase can hold tons of weaponry, drugs/paraphernalia, or even "shake and bake" meth labs and I don't see people leaving these items in the open. Do they inspect closets? Under mattresses? Do they ask to see your luggage? The trunk of your car? Are the security personal given extra training? I don't have a solution but I don't see it being effective in stopping another tragedy.
 

Raineman

Well-Known Member
As it stands now, I don't really have a problem with this policy, mainly because we are always gone from our room at midday, so we will never have an issue of being interrupted with the room checks. I have also always made sure to lock any valuables up before I leave the room, just in case. Here's where I see a potential issue down the road: some kind of attack happens on WDW property, or in the Orlando area, and Disney decides to ratchet up the security. Now, room checks are required to be done daily, with the occupants in the room, and include inspections of suitcases, handbags, etc, and performed by security personnel with access to firearms. At this point, the whole question of true invasion of privacy comes in to play. Not saying this will happen, but it has to be considered a possibility-many things done in our society in the name of protection can lead to that slippery slope where protection becomes control.
 

Oddysey

Well-Known Member
Does Disney have the right to assign said policy? Yes, because it is their property after all.

Do I agree with said policy? No, because it provides a false sense of security and if an occupant is really up to something nefarious then a quick scan of the room is not likely to solve anything. It is not only unproductive policy, but intrusive.
 

larryz

Well-Worn Member
Premium Member
I know the question has been answered but the flip lock was accidentally activated when we left our room at Caribbean Beach by the drapes. I was able to jimmy it open with a palm frond from the landscaping (shhhhh it took a few ;) ).

As for the room checks, I am really skeptical. A large suitcase can hold tons of weaponry, drugs/paraphernalia, or even "shake and bake" meth labs and I don't see people leaving these items in the open. Do they inspect closets? Under mattresses? Do they ask to see your luggage? The trunk of your car? Are the security personal given extra training? I don't have a solution but I don't see it being effective in stopping another tragedy.
They're looking for someone stupid enough to leave their room like this...
350003
 

Pooh.sHoneyHuntTDL

Well-Known Member
It's really dumb. Just because of one wacko in Vegas, there are room checks all the time now. That is actually unsafe and will probably lead to more individual crimes (violent and theft) if people can go into your room whenever they want.

The only reason it was even an issue was because he had a room in Vegas on an extremely high floor which provided an effective high elevation strategic position. That would not happen at the All Star Resorts, etc. It would only apply to the high floors of Swan/Dolphin, new Coronado, new Carribean. Use some come sense clown politicians and hotel execs.
 

flynnibus

Well-Known Member
It's really dumb. Just because of one wacko in Vegas, there are room checks all the time now. That is actually unsafe and will probably lead to more individual crimes (violent and theft) if people can go into your room whenever they want.
Except... they could do this before too. The only difference is the frequency and some people's insistence that it shouldn't happen.

The 'someone is in my room' is not new.

The only reason it was even an issue was because he had a room in Vegas on an extremely high floor which provided an effective high elevation strategic position. That would not happen at the All Star Resorts, etc. It would only apply to the high floors of Swan/Dolphin, new Coronado, new Carribean. Use some come sense clown politicians and hotel execs.
No - the issues of what is happening in a hotel room are not limited to sniper rifle position issues.
 
Top Bottom