Favorite Songs: 1960's & all the way 'til Today

prberk

Well-Known Member
I know I posted on this thread at one point in time, but I don't remember what I posted. Upon seeing it again I kind of got to wondering how much of a change my favorites evolved too. Let's see, first my favorite from the 60's.


And just a few decades later. 2019

"Don't Let the Old Man In" was Grammy-worthy, I think. Toby said he actually came up with it after a conversation with Clint Eastwood, when he asked Mr. Eastwood how he kept on at his age with such youth. Eastwood answered, "I don't let the old man in."

Have you heard Tanya Tucker's new song, "Bring My Flowers Now"? It is powerful in the same way.

Here is her Grammy performance last Sunday:


 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
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"Don't Let the Old Man In" was Grammy-worthy, I think. Toby said he actually came up with it after a conversation with Clint Eastwood, when he asked Mr. Eastwood how he kept on at his age with such youth. Eastwood answered, "I don't let the old man in."

Have you heard Tanya Tucker's new song, "Bring My Flowers Now"? It is powerful in the same way.

Here is her Grammy performance last Sunday:


I have to agree on your Grammy worthy thought. I immediately tuned into "Don't let the Old Man in" the first time I saw/heard it. I was really taken by the lyrics. The section that hit me the strongest was the phrase.. "Ask yourself how old you'd be if you didn't know the day you were born". Very deep and Toby surprised me that he had that depth of thought, but apparently he does. I listen to that song every time I start feeling down about my calendar age. (which is often these days) It always motivates me to "get up and go outside". You sit around doing nothing and you will be as old as you think.

Tanya's is a nice song to but it relies on others to step up. Old man tells you that you have to take the initiative. That I can control, try as I might, I can't control what others do.
 

prberk

Well-Known Member
I have to agree on your Grammy worthy thought. I immediately tuned into "Don't let the Old Man in" the first time I saw/heard it. I was really taken by the lyrics. The section that hit me the strongest was the phrase.. "Ask yourself how old you'd be if you didn't know the day you were born". Very deep and Toby surprised me that he had that depth of thought, but apparently he does. I listen to that song every time I start feeling down about my calendar age. (which is often these days) It always motivates me to "get up and go outside". You sit around doing nothing and you will be as old as you think.

Tanya's is a nice song to but it relies on others to step up. Old man tells you that you have to take the initiative. That I can control, try as I might, I can't control what others do.
That is good insight for comparison. Something I had not thought of, although I guess both in a way can inspire us to act while we have the time. Thanks for your thoughtful comment.

And as for Toby, I understand what you thought about him. I think many of these artists play to what sells for most of their career -- partly influenced I am sure by what the record company agrees to -- but I like it when they get to a level of their own where the record company allows them to put out something that has depth even if it would never be the darling of pop or FM radio. Vince Gill is in that part of his career now. Some of his newer stuff is deeper and less pop friendly, and he also enjoys bluegrass and working with the Eagles because he can now. Have you heard "Dear Hate" by Maren Morris and Vince Gill? That is a deeply moving song, written in response to the SC church shooting and finally finished and put out after the Las Vegas shootings.

When you see some of these guys now in concert, the venues are more intimate and the crowds smaller, but you usually get the real thing more often.
 

wdwfan4ver

Well-Known Member
Love the Statler Brothers. They won "Entertainer(s) of the Year" at the CMAs for several years, and for good reason. They were a group that understood that entertaining was more than just singing. Harold alone was hilarious.
I agree with you that they were entertaining more than just signing although they were very talented signers and songwriters.

I saw them in concert twice back in the 1980s as a kid and that is where My younger brother and I discovered how entertaining they were even without singing. I did not have a chance to see Lew Dewitt in concert at all. I Thought him and Jimmy were very talented as tenors despite their voices were different.

I used to watch their own tv show back in the 1990s.

My parents introduced my younger brother and I to them to their music back when we were little. My parent had a lot of cassette tape version of their albums that were played in the van my mom had at the time while going on trips at the time. One of the family traditions that still happen to this day is play their Christmas Albums during Christmas time. The Cassette tape version were a combination of the Lew Dewitt era and the Jimmy Fortune era.
 

prberk

Well-Known Member
I agree with you that they were entertaining more than just signing although they were very talented signers and songwriters.

I saw them in concert twice back in the 1980s as a kid and that is where My younger brother and I discovered how entertaining they were even without singing. I did not have a chance to see Lew Dewitt in concert at all. I Thought him and Jimmy were very talented as tenors despite their voices were different.

I used to watch their own tv show back in the 1990s.

My parents introduced my younger brother and I to them to their music back when we were little. My parent had a lot of cassette tape version of their albums that were played in the van my mom had at the time while going on trips at the time. One of the family traditions that still happen to this day is play their Christmas Albums during Christmas time. The Cassette tape version were a combination of the Lew Dewitt era and the Jimmy Fortune era.
You remind me of something a gentlemen from church told me one time that has stuck with me. He said that there was value in being expected at a young age to listen to what parents listened to in the car, that many modern parents were doing a disservice to children by catering to them on entertainment tastes all the time. You learned something (both about the driver's music and in learning to get along) by being expected to defer to the driver or elders to the radio in the car and NOT expected to put your earphones in or control the radio. You created memories like the ones you just expressed, and you learned about music that wasn't likely a child's natural tastes. And along the way you learned that the world doesn't revolve around you.

I am seeing that value more and more today, as families more and more cater to children and too often create shallow brats. And even the well-mannered kids can benefit from the wonderful things that they can learn in deferring to their elders from time to time. Of course, it can go the other way as well -- parents asking the kids to play some of their favorite music on the car radio from time to time. But overall I see a tremendous benefit in the story you told and how the experience of listening to the music of your elders can have such a meaningful place.
 

TheDuke

Well-Known Member
Basically the pinnacle of popular music and has one of the great music videos (or promotional clips as they were called at the time)

 

prberk

Well-Known Member
Some songs I seem to like "just because." No particular emotion or powerful lyrics -- but just good songs.

Two of those for me are "Islands in the Stream" by Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton


and "You're the Reason God Made Oklahoma" by David Frizell and Shelly West. I just like them, lol.

 
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