• Welcome to the WDWMAGIC.COM Forums!
    Please take a look around, and feel free to sign up and join the community.You can use your Twitter or Facebook account to sign up, or register directly.

Disney Attractions Inspired By Other Theme Parks

MickeyLuv'r

Well-Known Member
While I can't confirm this personally, I recently saw that Roy visited a number of places/parks before Disneyland opened. He and Walt wanted to study the feasibility of their own park.

There's an excellent database for worldwide roller coasters (and that's pretty close to the exact name). More or less, many amusement park/theme park rides are clones or near clones of rides that are found worldwide.

The Vekoma Junior coaster is one: = Goofy's Barnstormer, Woody's coaster, and Flight of Hippogriff are all examples. I don't know exactly what you mean when you said heavily inspired by each other. Clearly these 3 have different theming, but the essential ride is very similar. While not 100% complete, the database lists important details, like top speed if you want to see the finer points of how each ride differs slightly.

A second example is the aerial carousel: Dumbo, rockets, One fish/Two Fish, Triceratops Spin, and many other parks. (See: Zamperla's Aero top jet)

A third example is the recently closed Primeval Whirl. It has many names, but is commonly called a Mousetrap/Crazy Mouse. A number of parks call it exactly that, or something very close to mousetrap or Crazy Mouse.

A fourth is teacup rides.

There are, or were, also numerous examples of race cars/go carts, carousels, and individual boat rides around the world.

Before the Animal Kingdom Safari, there was the Lion Country Safari. And there are (obviously) many walk through animal exhibits around the world. Look at the gate to AK and the gate of the Tampa Zoo. Certainly look at the Tampa Zoo. For that matter, the Seas' giant tank and swim with dolphins experience are copies of tanks that exist(ed) at multiple aquariums. Certainly, Sea World long predates Epcot's the Seas.
 
Last edited:

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
This is clearly not a roller coaster but a dark ride in the same vein of Calico Mine Train at Knott's Berry Farm.
It has portions of coasting.

If I remember correctly, and @lazyboy97o might have knowledge of this too, but didn't SFOG used to have a Jungle Cruise style ride before Thunder River came along? That was prior to my first visit, but I remember hearing or reading something about it.

Now I'm feeling nostalgic for SFOG of yesteryear. I need to go dig out my autographed photo of Buford The Buzzard, which I have somewhere.
Jean Ribault’s Adventure.

Not an attraction, but single-price admission was pioneered by Six Flags.
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
Tales of the Okefenokee closed in 1980, years before Baxter claims to have had his aha moment. The similarities also end at water ride based on Br’et Rabbit. There is a connection in Bob Baranick who worked on Monster Plantation and Splash Mountain.
But couldn’t he not have drawn on that ride almost immediately after getting the itch to do a log flume?

Not “inspiration”...but original concept design?
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
Nothing much, I just meant the rafts for both Kali and Bluto's Bilge Rat Barges appear to be Zamperla products.
They’re not. Kali River Rapids is an Intamin product and Popeye and Bluto’s Bildge Rat Barges is, I believe, custom by Universal Creative.

But couldn’t he not have drawn on that ride almost immediately after getting the itch to do a log flume?

Not “inspiration”...but original concept design?
Nunis is the one who wanted a log flume and Baxter was trying to figure out what to do. He’s open about the influence of Knott’s Berry Farm on his work so it seems odd that he would never mention Tales of the Okefenokee since he could push Sid & Marty Krofft as inspiration instead of Six Flags. And again, they’re not really similar beyond the Br’er stories and being a water ride, not even the same type of water ride.
 

InnKpr

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
I don't know exactly what you mean when you said heavily inspired by each other.
It means an existing attraction at another theme park inspired the creation of one of Disney's.

The examples I posted in the OP for instance, take Timber Mountain log ride at Knott's Berry Farm. A themed water ride that goes through a "mountain" with a large drop. It was the first of this kind. This was obvious inspiration for Splash Mountain years later, even though the stories are completely different and the rides aren't exactly the same.
 
Last edited:

spock8113

Well-Known Member
Actually, a young Walt Disney was inspired by the 1939 Worlds Fair:



Then, in 1964, Disney returned the favor:

He then used what influenced him for his own theme park.
 

jloucks

Well-Known Member
Y'all knock my Six Flags Over Texas, but this very place has the very first log flume ride in an amusement park. I have ridden it over 100 times (over 40 years) and can tell you it is a trend starter. ...and a pretty good ride to boot.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
Actually, a young Walt Disney was inspired by the 1939 Worlds Fair:



Then, in 1964, Disney returned the favor:

He then used what influenced him for his own theme park.
The radial city plan does not originate with the 1939 fair. EPCOT's layout is rooted in the Garden City concept by Ebenezer Howard that was described in his book Garden Cities of To-Morrow first published in 1898. More directly, we known Walt owned a copy of The Heart of Our Cities, The Urban Crisis: Diagnosis and Cure by Victor Gruen. In this book, Gruen builds on the work of Howard and World's Fairs to propose what we would all recognize as EPCOT, not just its radial layout but also its enclosed downtown with subterranean service levels.

It was not just the Perisphere that inspired Imagineers. The final iteration of WestCOT Center replaced the massive SpaceStation Earth sphere with a giant spire not too unlike the Trylon.

The WEDway PeopleMover is another concept with origins at a fair. The World's Columbian Exposition of 1893 featured a pier that jutted out into Lake Michigan with a Moving Sidewalk, a covered belt that featured continuously moving benches. While this was years before Walt was born and Roy was just a newborn, their father Elias did work on the fair. It's interesting to wonder if he ever told his son about this contraption. This would not be the last Moving Sidewalk and they would even be proposed for cities like a 1924 proposal for Atlanta.

Y'all knock my Six Flags Over Texas, but this very place has the very first log flume ride in an amusement park. I have ridden it over 100 times (over 40 years) and can tell you it is a trend starter. ...and a pretty good ride to boot.
That's not the only trend they started. The Runaway Mine Train is the first mine train roller coaster and Disney no longer uses ticket books because of Six Flags Over Texas. It was also the first theme park based on the state in which it was located, so it was a sort of forefather of Disney's California Adventure.
 

vicariouscorpse

Well-Known Member
My two favorite haunted mansion knock offs:

Europa Park's Geisterschloss

Heavily inspired by and uses a lot of Haunted Mansion effects and scenes It's also filled to the brim with things going on around you it can be overwhelming trying to take it all in.


Nigoland's Le Manoir Hante

I love this because its just a shameless scene for scene recreation of the Haunted Mansion.

 

MickeyLuv'r

Well-Known Member
It means an existing attraction at another theme park inspired the creation of one of Disney's.

The examples I posted in the OP for instance, take Timber Mountain log ride at Knott's Berry Farm. A themed water ride that goes through a "mountain" with a large drop. It was the first of this kind. This was obvious inspiration for Splash Mountain years later, even though the stories are completely different and the rides aren't exactly the same.
I understood the main concept. The sentence in my post was about degree. Every coaster operating today has been inspired by those that preceded it; the laws of physics and all. The sentence in my post was meant a qualifier. It is an interesting topic, just in a forum, well, the premise is based on opinion, not a hard line in the sand, and that's a bit tricky to navigate.

A second challenge of your query is that a great many attractions and even whole parks have been lost to time.

Perhaps a good starting point is Leap the Dips in Lakemont Park, Altoona, PA. It is the oldest - still operating coaster in the USA, and a historic Landmark.
(I don't think this is quite what you were asking, but it is perhaps interesting to note, as it has much in common with newer coasters.)
 

Register on WDWMAGIC. This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.

Top Bottom