News Disney announces strategic restructuring of media and entertainment divisions.

Slpy3270

Well-Known Member
Disney+ is the only one I pay for. I can watch cooking channel and the late night shows for free.

Honestly that’s way more content than I need already.

If anything I feel like people are over the streaming thing after having more time at home.
Plus a large number of people with streaming services still pay for cable TV anyway.
 

doctornick

Well-Known Member
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Who says they're putting all their eggs in the streaming basket?

And Disney is already one of the big dogs.
This. I'm not sure why people keep acting like Disney is gutting their other areas and only going to be doing streaming. Disney+ is going to be a big area of push going forward, but they are still going to be making (theatrical) movies, operating TV networks, sell consumer goods and, yes, run theme parks.

In fact, I'd argue that their big time theatrical movies is a big aspect of the buildup for streaming. Having those popular tentpole MCU, Star Wars, animated, even live action remake type films allows the company to both profit off of large theatrical ticket sales and provide valuable content for Disney+ - that's a huge win especially as they are the type of "popular" films that many people will watch more than once.

And the parks allow for ongoing value for promoting the Disney brand. There's a clear synergy there that helps with streaming loyalty and vice versa. There's no reason to think that any of that is going away or being de-emphasized despite the push for streaming.
 

_caleb

Well-Known Member
Plus a large number of people with streaming services still pay for cable TV anyway.
Yeah, but fewer every year!
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Slpy3270

Well-Known Member
This. I'm not sure why people keep acting like Disney is gutting their other areas and only going to be doing streaming. Disney+ is going to be a big area of push going forward, but they are still going to be making (theatrical) movies, operating TV networks, sell consumer goods and, yes, run theme parks.

In fact, I'd argue that their big time theatrical movies is a big aspect of the buildup for streaming. Having those popular tentpole MCU, Star Wars, animated, even live action remake type films allows the company to both profit off of large theatrical ticket sales and provide valuable content for Disney+ - that's a huge win especially as they are the type of "popular" films that many people will watch more than once.

And the parks allow for ongoing value for promoting the Disney brand. There's a clear synergy there that helps with streaming loyalty and vice versa. There's no reason to think that any of that is going away or being de-emphasized despite the push for streaming.
It's the media analysts pushing the BS. To them, TV networks and movie theaters are like newspapers and radio and are doomed to cease to exist.
 

ImperfectPixie

Well-Known Member
Analysts seemed to downplay that since Netflix is the undisputed streaming king.

Still, these are not the results they wanted to see. They wanted the same kind of explosive growth seen in the spring since they were betting people would see it as an "essential" service.
Don't forget though, they had some pretty big backlash over a particular film. #cancelnetflix trended because of it.
 

ImperfectPixie

Well-Known Member
In fairness, that backlash was because Netflix didn't know how to properly market it. The actual movie was pretty good, though the message it sends kinda contradicts itself.
I saw it...and agree completely. I think it's very unfortunate that so many couldn't see past the 3-minute scene towards the end to make note of the many important issues the film touched upon.
 

UNCgolf

Well-Known Member
Those numbers aren't that surprising to me. There really hasn't been much of a reason recently for anyone to subscribe who wasn't already subscribed (no real major original content releases that I'm aware of), and losing extremely popular shows like the Office and Parks & Rec could have lost some subscribers. They also have far more competition now (hence why they lost shows like the Office and Parks & Rec).

They can't grow forever; there's a limit to the number of potential subscribers that they'll eventually hit.
 

ppete1975

Well-Known Member
Disney+ is the only one I pay for. I can watch cooking channel and the late night shows for free.

Honestly that’s way more content than I need already.

If anything I feel like people are over the streaming thing after having more time at home. Not that I think it’s going away, but the model that multiple companies are betting on is not going to be the long term answer for them. Imho of course.
i pay for disney+ get hulu for free from sprint (all sprint tmobile users do) and bought an apple phone so got apple+ for free
none i would pay for besides disney... the question is when does disney+ up the price..
it wont be this year cause i just got my renewal letter.
 

MisterPenguin

Rumormonger
Premium Member
Netflix still made a profit this 3Q ($790M), which is what, the only other quarter besides 2Q it has profited from?

I'm not into the Wall Street hair-on-fire drama when a company doesn't meet expected profits, but still profits big. Wall Street's concern is that their stock in the company or its dividends isn't as big as they'd like in their wallets.

Netflix has reached the tipping point where their subs are more than their costs... for now.

Netflix needs to hang onto subs and still get more. And Netflix will soon hit their content hole from the lack of productions this Summer which might turn people off (for a while).
 

_caleb

Well-Known Member
Those numbers aren't that surprising to me. There really hasn't been much of a reason recently for anyone to subscribe who wasn't already subscribed (no real major original content releases that I'm aware of), and losing extremely popular shows like the Office and Parks & Rec could have lost some subscribers. They also have far more competition now (hence why they lost shows like the Office and Parks & Rec).

They can't grow forever; there's a limit to the number of potential subscribers that they'll eventually hit.
I agree. It's the releases of the big stuff (as we saw with Disney+ and Hamilton) that draws new people in. But analysts are still saying there's a TON of room for growth. I think I mentioned in a previous post that market saturation of all streaming services combined is only estimated to be like 12%.

But I completely agree that Netflix itself can't grow forever. Their model sort of limits what they can do without raising or lowering prices- either of which seems like it might hurt the company in this environment.
 

ppete1975

Well-Known Member
Right! And when we do, it's not like we're interacting with strangers or even the world around us. Most people stare at their phones or ignore others.

At WDW: ECVs + Refillable Insulated Soda Cups + Smartphones = View attachment 507486
Wall-e isnt just an amazing movie thats beautifully done. Its showing you the future, how its not in Epcot ill never know. I just hope we can get clothes we push a button and they change colors.. id be down for that
 

ppete1975

Well-Known Member
I am very curious what the news regarding peanuts means to the rest of streaming. Apple is now going to be the home of peanuts holiday specials (although there will be free to watch times without membership). I wonder if netflix and amazon are now going after the other broadcast treasures (stop motion classics..frosty rudolph etc). I think disney will continue to run christmas and holiday shows on abc (since they own them and its basically free advertising for the brand). I wouldnt even be shocked with lego star wars hitting abc once before christmas since its hitting disney + so early.
 

Slpy3270

Well-Known Member
I am very curious what the news regarding peanuts means to the rest of streaming. Apple is now going to be the home of peanuts holiday specials (although there will be free to watch times without membership). I wonder if netflix and amazon are now going after the other broadcast treasures (stop motion classics..frosty rudolph etc). I think disney will continue to run christmas and holiday shows on abc (since they own them and its basically free advertising for the brand). I wouldnt even be shocked with lego star wars hitting abc once before christmas since its hitting disney + so early.
NBCUni and Warner Bros. own most of the stop-motion Christmas specials so they'll likely go on their services instead of Amazon and Netflix, unless broadcasters are able to outbid them (CBS should be most concerned, since NBC could decide to bring Frosty and Rudolph on their network once the contract goes up).

And as far as Disney's networks are concerned, most of the Christmas stuff they air are owned by them anyway, and they own a LOT of Christmas stuff. That's not even getting into Freeform's original Christmas movies dating back to the Family Channel days.
 

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