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Covid Vaccine Updates and General Discussion About Vaccines

Will you take a Covid vaccine once one is approved and deemed safe and effective by the FDA?

  • Yes, stick me please

  • No, I will wait

  • No, I will never take one


Results are only viewable after voting.

GoofGoof

Premium Member
Original Poster
From everything I've read that seems to indicate that they previously had covid - at least in articles I'm reading and from people I've talked to. My friend's whole family had covid and all of them felt horrible with the first shot - nothing for the second.
That was my though too, but I was just reading somewhere that they don’t think that’s the case. Who knows. So far I have not found anyone who has had moderate to severe symptoms after both shots. The few who had them on shot 1 had next to nothing on shot 2 and those with not much on shot 1 had more of a reaction on shot 2. I know 1 person who had no reaction to either shot and they are now worried it didn’t work
 

Smooth

Well-Known Member
Just wondering out loud ... if someone has COVID antibodies... are they more or less likely to have sideaffects after taking the vaccine?
 

MansionButler84

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
Just wondering out loud ... if someone has COVID antibodies... are they more or less likely to have sideaffects after taking the vaccine?
More likely after first—they already have memory B and T cells to respond to the spike proteins you make. This generates a stronger immune response.

1614873921298.jpeg
Look at antibody levels the first time you are exposed to something vs. any subsequent exposure. For those who haven’t had COVID-19, shot 1 is primary, shot 2 is secondary. If you’ve had Covid-19, you experienced primary when you were sick. Shot 1 is secondary. Shot 2 will presumably increase antibody titer even further and give you the power of invisibility. No more signing up for RotR BGs.
 
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danlb_2000

Well-Known Member
More likely after first—they already have memory B and T cells to respond to the spike proteins they make. This generates a stronger immune response.

View attachment 537155
Look at antibody levels the first time you are exposed to something vs. any subsequent exposure. For those who haven’t had COVID-19, shot 1 is primary, shot 2 is secondary. If you’ve had Covid-19, you experienced primary when you were sick. Shot 1 is secondary. Shot 2 will presumably increase antibody titer even further and give you the power of invisibility. No more signing up for RotR BGs.

I am extremely disappointed in this post, I wanted the power to control people's minds. :(
 

Epcot_Imagineer

Well-Known Member
Shot 2 will presumably increase antibody titer even further and give you the power of invisibility. No more signing up for RotR BGs.
The joke is not lost on me, lol - but I have seen articles starting to come out saying there doesn't seem to be a need to give people who already had covid a second booster shot. It is appearing that if you have already had covid, only one of the shots will do. I'll try and find an article link!

EDIT: Here's the link!
 

MansionButler84

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
The joke is not lost on me, lol - but I have seen articles starting to come out saying there doesn't seem to be a need to give people who already had covid a second booster shot. It is appearing that if you have already had covid, only one of the shots will do. I'll try and find an article link!
That is scientifically-sound, with a huge caveat—we don’t know anywhere close to everyone who had Covid and the tests (in particular, antibody tests, which you would presumably now use to verify prior infections) are not sufficiently-accurate to base such a decision on. Further, I am unaware of any single system where a pharmacy or clinic can easily see who had it. From a public health standpoint, it is safer and simpler to give everyone receiving Pfizer or Moderna 2 doses. Why take a blood sample and (poorly) test for antibodies when you can more quickly jab a person twice?

It perhaps makes more sense in areas that will not have sufficient vaccine until late 2021 or even 2022. But that’s not the USA.
 

Epcot_Imagineer

Well-Known Member
That is scientifically-sound, with a huge caveat—we don’t know anywhere close to everyone who had Covid and the tests (in particular, antibody tests, which you would presumably now use to verify prior infections) are not sufficiently-accurate to base such a decision on. Further, I am unaware of any single system where a pharmacy or clinic can easily see who had it. From a public health standpoint, it is safer and simpler to give everyone receiving Pfizer or Moderna 2 doses. Why take a blood sample and (poorly) test for antibodies when you can more quickly jab a person twice?

It perhaps makes more sense in areas that will not have sufficient vaccine until late 2021 or even 2022. But that’s not the USA.
Agreed completely - the article says it could possibly free up ~10% of doses, but there is no great way to verify having Covid apart from a positive test. But that doesn't take into account false positives/negatives. Additionally there is likely a huge disparity between antibody levels regarding different people who contracted covid through differing viral loads. It makes so much more sense to just administer vaccines according to plan.
 

Queen of the WDW Scene

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
From everything I've read that seems to indicate that they previously had covid - at least in articles I'm reading and from people I've talked to. My friend's whole family had covid and all of them felt horrible with the first shot - nothing for the second.

While I haven't had the second one yet to know if I'll have side effects I'm about 98% sure I have not had covid knowingly or asymptomatically.
I go out and about the least in my household and I'm sure if one of the younger people in my house got it then my parents in their 70's would have gotten it. My parents have both had surgeries in the past 8 months that required covid tests and they came back negative.
My niece has had several covid tests from going out to state for college and they have all come back negative.
And my sister had to have one for a surgery and one she as a teacher volunteered for to keep schools open and they were both negative.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
Original Poster
Exact details on the accelerated JnJ manufacturing are still not solid, but the buzz is that they are now anticipating exceeding the 100M doses expected by end of June thanks to the new deal with Merck. I’ve also read that the new anticipated date to reach 100M doses is May 31. That puts us on pace to have enough doses for 300M Americans by the end of May, far more than the 250M 18+ adults in the US or the 280M 12+ if the teen trial wraps up before May (which it should). I also think this makes it a lock that vaccines are open to the general public some time in April in almost every state and possibly even end of March in some states. It will depend on speed of injections, demand and number of people designated as preferred vs general public. Since every state has their own definition and their own level of vaccine acceptance it’s possible some states move to “general public” a month or more ahead of others. Either way if you are part of the “general public” group in your state in a month or so it should be open season :)

 

pixie225

Active Member
I have a pre-existing developmental disability (high functioning Autism), so under NY guidelines, I'm eligible. I have my appointment for my first dose Monday evening. I'm kind of nervous.
Don't be nervous. My special needs daughter is nervous about everything, and handled it like a trooper. She loved talking to all the national guard people there. And the nurse who gave the shot was very compassionate, as was the man who signed her in before the shot.
 

helenabear

Well-Known Member
I have a pre-existing developmental disability (high functioning Autism), so under NY guidelines, I'm eligible. I have my appointment for my first dose Monday evening. I'm kind of nervous.
Try not to be nervous. Most people do well and are in and out quickly. I was part of a trial and have total confidence in our vaccines.

I had very little reaction both times outside of a sore arm. So far I was the worst of my family too and mine was highly livable both times.
 

helenabear

Well-Known Member
I get a JNJ shot tomorrow. I’ll follow back to let you guys know how that goes. Cool thing about it, after the shot I’m done.
While I am happy to hear about anyone getting a shot, I am very curious to hear how you feel. I have had friends in the J&J trial but they still don't know what they got to give info.
 

Queen of the WDW Scene

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
I get a JNJ shot tomorrow. I’ll follow back to let you guys know how that goes. Cool thing about it, after the shot I’m done.

I get the feeling that if we end up needing boosters we'll probably all end up getting J&J since its one and done and easy to store.
I almost wonder too if its what kids are going to be more likely to get.
I can't wait to hear how it went for you!
 

Queen of the WDW Scene

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
Quick question about how the person giving the shot did it...
I hate shots and usually I just get stabbed with them.
Sometimes though including the guy that gave me the Moderna shot yesterday they pinch and hold a bit of my upper arm and then give the shot while holding the area which to me makes so much more sense because the area is more stable and honestly seems to hurt less.
 

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