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Architecture

Missing20K

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Seems there are more than a few members that enjoy a lively and engaging debate on the topic of architecture so let’s all gather here and try to keep the thread derailments to a minimum. I know I’m as guilty as any.

It can be just a dumping ground for derailments on architecture and design at Disney or just in general. But at least now there is a dedicated space to discuss it.

A start perhaps....the new dvc towers are like 5 over 2 buildings on steroids.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
I’m a sucker for tangents. They’re what get me thinking about something.

The new DVC buildings are hideous. There seems to be a widespread loss at translatin “real” architecture to the operational needs of a fixed amusement enterprise. Scales are off. Proportions skewed. Materials tend toward lots of stucco (but it is amazing what Nassal can do with the stuff!).
 

Missing20K

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
I’m a sucker for tangents. They’re what get me thinking about something.

The new DVC buildings are hideous. There seems to be a widespread loss at translatin “real” architecture to the operational needs of a fixed amusement enterprise. Scales are off. Proportions skewed. Materials tend toward lots of stucco (but it is amazing what Nassal can do with the stuff!).
Sometimes I wish Steve organized it like reddit, so we could all indulge our tangent tendencies, but then nothing of consequence to WDW would ever get discussed.

I know the DVC aren't technically a 5 over 2 construction from a code and type point of view, but the way they are proportioned they almost are. A floor or two of "Masonry" followed by the requisite number of floor slabs, topped off with a some sort of flourished roof element.

There seems to be little room for any architectural element that can't be directly correlated to an acceptable ROI. This isn't exclusive to Disney unfortunately either, I have projects right now, that the client simply does not understand how much things cost to build. My guess is there are many execs at DIS that are similarly unaware, and the sticker shock of projects can really hamper the architects ability to add value through design.
 
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