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What Do "Average Guests" Think About Each Park?

Hcalvert

Well-Known Member
This is super silly. I think you are joking.

I promise, it is possible to visit NYC with 3 kids, no pre-planned reservations, and easily spend $1,000's of dollars shopping. I'm sure it wouldn't be hard to spend close to $1,000 just at the Disney Store alone (Times Square) - with 3 kids. If you do little more than breathe in NYC, you can drop $100.

You are also totally incorrect about The National Museum of African American History and Culture (I assume that is what you mean by "new AA museum.") The museum doesn't even allow folks reserve passes more than 3 months out, and that is just ONE of many options on/near the National Mall.

Half of the year, visitors can enter it on weekdays with no pass at all + get same day passes on weekends (just have to sign up early in the morning).

From the Smithsonian website:
The Museum requires timed-entry passes for certain peak times and seasons when visitation is highest. During off-peak times, when visitation is lower, visitors can enter the Museum on weekdays without passes.

Off-Peak Season (September-February)
Walk-Up Weekday entry begins at 10 am Monday through Friday.
  • Timed passes will only be required on weekends.
  • Passes are available online three months in advance and are issued the first Wednesday of every month.
  • Same-day online passes are released at 6:30 am, Saturday and Sunday.
  • Walk-up entry is not available on Saturdays or Sundays due to high visitation.
Peak Season (March-August)
Advance Timed Passes and same-day online timed passes are required for entry before 1pm and on the weekends.
  • Walk-Up Weekday entry begins at 1pm Monday through Friday.
  • Passes are available online three months in advance and are issued the first Wednesday of every month.
  • Same-day online passes are released at 6:30 am, Monday – Sunday.
  • Groups are required to have passes every day during peak and off-peak seasons.
  • Walk-up entry is not available on Saturdays or Sundays due to high visitation.
Plus, the Smithsonian has 10 other museums on the National Mall, plus 6 others in the DC area, and the National Zoo. they don't even offer passes or tickets to enter any of those. They are completely free to enter. There's a bunch more pay museums like the Spy Museum and Newseum, which are just off the National Mall. There there's at least a days worth of monuments in the vicinity: Jefferson, Lincoln, FDR, MLK Jr., Vietnam, WWII, Arlington National Cemetery, etc.
I went with students on the DC trip in November 2016. We were told that the museum tickets were difficult to get and they did have a waiting list. However, you are right about getting same day tickets if you get there before they open. Due to us being a tour group of 3 buses, the tour guides were able to reserve them the night before and probably helped the tickets were for school kids. They got in with no problems this year. The Holocaust Museum can be difficult to get in certain times of the year without advance tickets. To tour the White House, we had to get Senator Sherrod Brown's recommendation as well as make a binder of the kids' information and pictures for security to view.
 
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MickeyLuv'r

Active Member
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  1. I never at all complained about you posting what people have told you about WDW, so I'm not sure what that comment was about.
  2. If they weren't interested in going on rides, I'm not sure why they decided to go on a vacation to a theme park. It's great they had fun, but that seems like a really odd choice for a vacation to me.
  1. Yeah, that was some other posters, not you.
  2. The people I mentioned are seniors. I didn't think it at all odd that they weren't into RnRC.
They went to WDW for a number of reasons: part of it was family time, and part of it was nostalgia. For them, riding the monorail and the shuttle boats is a fun time. They like the old school MK stuff, like HoP, fireworks, and the Peoplemover. After a few attractions though, their endurance just isn't what it once was. Still, they love the energy of WDW. (but not the prices!)

Oh, gosh though, we once saw a rather senior couple sporting matching Space TMn logo light up jackets while riding Space Mtn. around 10pm. They looked giddy! They were AEWSOME! I hope that's me when I'm a senior!

Then again, I've also gone to WDW with the very young, too. They are also just happy to be at WDW. They also don't need many rides to have fun at WDW. They are mesmerized by colors, smells, sounds, and little things like coloring at the Kidcot stations or the jumping fountains. Gosh, little kids can spend a LONG time happily playing in the splash areas! Oh, the kid sized bathrooms are a big hit too! (I knew a kid who would've happily spent the whole day exploring WDW's bathrooms looking for kiddie sinks!).

Once, we were awakened very early by some young kids running along the corridor outside our WDW hotel room at one of the moderates. It was slightly annoying, but they were so happy yelling, "We're going to Didney World!" Not realizing they were already there. They were just so happy! it made us all smile. We didn't have the heart to complain.


WDW is a bit like an onion. It has layers, and there is more than one way to approach it.
 

Shouldigo12

Well-Known Member
  1. Yeah, that was some other posters, not you.
  2. The people I mentioned are seniors. I didn't think it at all odd that they weren't into RnRC.
They went to WDW for a number of reasons: part of it was family time, and part of it was nostalgia. For them, riding the monorail and the shuttle boats is a fun time. They like the old school MK stuff, like HoP, fireworks, and the Peoplemover. After a few attractions though, their endurance just isn't what it once was. Still, they love the energy of WDW. (but not the prices!)

Oh, gosh though, we once saw a rather senior couple sporting matching Space TMn logo light up jackets while riding Space Mtn. around 10pm. They looked giddy! They were AEWSOME! I hope that's me when I'm a senior!

Then again, I've also gone to WDW with the very young, too. They are also just happy to be at WDW. They also don't need many rides to have fun at WDW. They are mesmerized by colors, smells, sounds, and little things like coloring at the Kidcot stations or the jumping fountains. Gosh, little kids can spend a LONG time happily playing in the splash areas! Oh, the kid sized bathrooms are a big hit too! (I knew a kid who would've happily spent the whole day exploring WDW's bathrooms looking for kiddie sinks!).

Once, we were awakened very early by some young kids running along the corridor outside our WDW hotel room at one of the moderates. It was slightly annoying, but they were so happy yelling, "We're going to Didney World!" Not realizing they were already there. They were just so happy! it made us all smile. We didn't have the heart to complain.


WDW is a bit like an onion. It has layers, and there is more than one way to approach it.
Hoo boy. On my flight to Disney World there was a little boy behind us who was so excited. "Dad! Dad! DAD! Is that Disney World?! Can we see it yet? When are we landing? Dad! DAD! Are we almost there yet? Dad, I think i can see it...". I would be lying if I said it wasn't a little aggravating, but I couldn't really say anything either since I had the same monologue going on in my head.
 

MickeyLuv'r

Active Member
I went with students on the DC trip in November 2016. We were told that the museum tickets were difficult to get and they did have a waiting list. However, you are right about getting same day tickets if you get there before they open. Due us being a tour group of 3 buses, the tour guides were able to reserve them the night before and probably helped the tickets were for school kids. They got in with no problems this year. The Holocaust Museum can be difficult to get in certain times of the year without advance tickets. To tour the White House, we had to get Senator Sherrod Brown's recommendation as well as make a binder of the kids' information and pictures for security to view.
Yes, touring the White House is special. I think most folks realize they can't just enter it whenever they want, as the president actually lives there, and is protected by the Secret Service.

Then again, everyone can walk just outside the White House grounds any time: right up to the famous fence. So you can SEE the White House and get a photo of it, just not inside the grounds.

I haven't gone to the US Capitol in a very long time, but I'm pretty sure you can still tour parts of that without a reservation. Obviously though, some of the areas are restricted unless you ask your representatives or have official business. Visitors are also allowed to watch Congress in session though, as space permits, at least at open sessions.

I just thought it was a little funny someone cited DC. I mean, of all US cities, it is VERY easy to spend several days touring DC without much pre-planning.
 

MickeyLuv'r

Active Member
Hoo boy. On my flight to Disney World there was a little boy behind us who was so excited. "Dad! Dad! DAD! Is that Disney World?! Can we see it yet? When are we landing? Dad! DAD! Are we almost there yet? Dad, I think i can see it...". I would be lying if I said it wasn't a little aggravating, but I couldn't really say anything either since I had the same monologue going on in my head.
If you arrive at night, I hear you can see the WDW fireworks in the air from the plane.
 

MickeyLuv'r

Active Member
  1. If they weren't interested in going on rides, I'm not sure why they decided to go on a vacation to a theme park. It's great they had fun, but that seems like a really odd choice for a vacation to me.
Ooh, I just remembered one more- though it was at Universal. We once happened to be there during Harry Potter Weekend, and there were quite a few folks with rather elaborate costumes/cosplay.

I could be wrong, but many of the costumes appeared way too elaborate to go on any rides. Several women were dressed as the singing lady, complete with grapes and a picture frame around their body. Another wore Luna Lovegood's giant lion's head. Still another was the human armchair (from the scene in the Half-Blood Prince).

In theory these folks cold have taken off their costumes to go on rides, but I REALLY don't think they did.

I have to admit, there were some very amazing, detail oriented costumes! And some of them - like Newt Salamander with a delicate bowtruckle (little plant critter- had to look up the name myself) - looked too delicate to wear on the rides at Universal.

Certainly this isn't the norm, but it these folks looked very happy to spend the day just being seen.
 

Trackmaster

Active Member
The topic of this thread is, "what do "Average Guests" think about each park?" So silly me, I attempted to chime in with the things real people have told me about WDW.

Some of the ideas expressed in this thread are just plain silly. There's waay too much what-about-ism.

On average, over 50,000 people visit WDW every day. I agree, many of them do dumb stuff, have unreasonable expectations, and complain. But none of those are exclusive to non-planners. Crowds don't magically disappear when if I make an ADR.

Funny, thing, I have actually been to WDW with people who were happy just to be there. Despite ADR's and FP reserved for them, they weren't all that interested in going on rides. They didn't need FP to see the things they wanted to see; I think one of the few exceptions was the safari ride. We might have also gone on Peter Pan, or maybe had a few FP for rides where the wait without one would have been the same.

As far as ADR's, they thought the whole idea was silly, "Why don't we just eat when we get hungry?" To a large extent, they did just that! At the hotel concierge desk they asked the CM for a list of options. I suppose you could say that = a little research.

On the monorail loop, TS options generally include: The Wave, GF Café, Citricos, Kona Café, Luau Cove, and (neaby at Ft. W) Trail's End and Pioneer Hall. Kona Café also has a sushi counter called Kona Island. If it is full, the QS places are always an option. Room service is one more option, though I have only ever used RS a few times myself.

The Boardwalk area has a TON of walk up options: ESPN, the Brewpub, Ale & Compass, (often) Flying Fish, Kimonos, (often) Garden Grove, Il Mulino, Shula's, TE's bluezoo, Yachtsman Steakhouse, Fresh, the Fountain. Trattoria del Forno, the deluxe hotels also serve some food at their full serve bars.

There's also usually a bunch of options in Disney Springs, and the other resorts: Boatwright's, Bongos, Frontera Cocina, H of Blues, Maya Grill, Olivia's, Turf Grill, Planet Hollywood, Raglan Road, Sebastian's Bistro, T-Rex, Rainforest Café to name some of the many options.

Mind, I didn't say I never plan myself at WDW. When I took the above person, I actually had secured an ADR for Be Our Guests, and that was when it was new and very hard to get. It actually killed me a little when this person said they didn't want to go there!

Personally, I tend to make FP's. All the times I've had the DDP, I make ADR's. These days, I only make a few ADR's if any. we've had too mnay aggravating experienes with ADR's.
Response to the bolded stuff up top: That is absolutely true. If EVERYBODY who want to WDW had to go on a minimum of at least five rides per park trip, the lines would be at least twice as long as they are now, or more. For the volume of people that go to WDW the only reason that you can get on any ride is that so many people just don't do the rides. Or, they might be perfectly happy just doing 2-3 rides (for the purposes of "rides" I mean anything that you can book a FP+ for other than the shows), and taking in other experiences the rest of the day).
 

MickeyLuv'r

Active Member
I've read posts from, and talked to folks who live close to WDW, who often go for a few rides and then leave. Maybe they pair dinner with a few rides if the lines are short and the weather is nice.

In other threads, I've gone back and forth with folks who have told me - more or less- everyone only ever goes to WDW for a week.
 

jaklgreen

Well-Known Member
Um, okay. I accept you don't want to hear that it is possible to travel without making elaborate plans.
There is a big difference in planning every second(which is NOT what I am saying), and being prepared and knowledgeable about where you are going. I never said that a person needs to make elaborate plans, only that you should know something about where you are going. Showing up to a strange city and just wandering around without knowing what areas are safe is foolish. You do not have to plan everything, you can be spontaneous, but still have a general idea of where you are going and what you are doing. I am going to assume that you are a man. As a woman, it is dangerous and stupid to just show up to a strange city and winging it.
 

AJH219

Well-Known Member
My friends enjoyed DAK, especially Everest and the Safari. They appreciated the extensive attention to detail throughout the park, so it does not go unnoticed or only something we superfans care about!

They were not all that impressed with Epcot (who can blame them?). As we did this park after DAK, we were only able to ride Soarin thanks to a last minute FP and Spaceship Earth. The former was a hit with them, but they felt SSE was a little old in the teeth, recognizing it abruptly ends with the invention of computers/internet....though they did enjoy most of the ride. While they marveled at the design of the World Showcase pavilions, they did feel there was not much to do.

Now to be fair, I only had 3 hours to give them a grand circle tour, so to speak, of the park so we had no time for the films or exhibits....just quick browsing. But they did make note of stuff they want to see during their next visit. So that, the fact they want to come back, tells me all I need to know about how they enjoyed themselves! They did remark that without someone as knowledgeable about the experience as me, they would feel very overwhelmed....particularly since it was a busy weekend and would have likely given up early on.
 

Janir

Active Member
Honestly, I think the average guest is blown away by Walt Disney World. Mostly likely, they have been to amusement parks in the past, so this is their reference for establishing their expectations when coming to Disney. Yet, when they get there, they find that Walt Disney World is so much more than just an amusement park. For every disgruntled "old timer" who says that he/she is never going again, there are scores of people who can't wait to return.
LOL!! My first trip I totally expected to be a casual WDW guest. Then I had interactions wit Customer Service to plan dinner reservations around MK fireworks with some coordination of Floral gift. Then I actually to to WDW. DAK was the first park I ever went to and was expecting a over glorified zoo. Was rather blown away. My next park was EPCOT and totally blown away by what it was. MK in the rain for 3rd park. Even in the rain all day I was just overwhelmed at just the attractions, the general level of fun and again Disney customer service. Simple things in stores from Cast Members helping direct traffic in the store to directing you to open registers when you looked lost. Had so much fun that we stayed an extra day that trip just so we could do a MK day in the sun. As we drove my truck for this vacation and had an extra day before we'd have to be back to work, we stayed and MK in the sun and the fireworks that night was the final clincher. I was fully Disneyfied fan right there and been that way ever since.
 

Trackmaster

Active Member
I've read posts from, and talked to folks who live close to WDW, who often go for a few rides and then leave. Maybe they pair dinner with a few rides if the lines are short and the weather is nice.

In other threads, I've gone back and forth with folks who have told me - more or less- everyone only ever goes to WDW for a week.
Well, some people have a loose definition on the meaning of the word "everyone." Many people just mean 90% of people instead of meaning the literal definition of everyone. When they say "no one" they probably mean "not enough people to make a material difference."

Yeah, the awesome thing about being an AP who is close by is that you're guaranteed the three FP+'s, and everything on top of that is icing on the cake. And sometimes you're lucky enough to hit a day that's deserted, and you can really clean up. Between the FP+'s, you can try to tab, or just try your luck at the stand-by, or look around at the details, shows, or the hidden attractions/entertainment. To be honest, I used to be frustrated with hotel guests getting the 60 day window for the FP+'s, but at this point, I realize that they need the extra days and the EMH's just to level the playing field a little. To be honest, they probably need even more just to stay competitive with us locals.
 

MickeyLuv'r

Active Member
Um , Here are your words: post #142, and post #152.

If a person is spending thousands( sometimes 10s of thousands) of dollars on your dream family vacation, why wouldn't you do as much research as possible before you go.
This has nothing to do with going to WDW. A person should research ANYWHERE they go, especially spending that kind of time and money. I don't leave for a trip unless I know exactly where I am going and what I will do there. I plan my routes in unfamiliar cities and even go to google maps and street view it so that it is familiar to me.
Sigh. Now you say:
There is a big difference in planning every second(which is NOT what I am saying), and being prepared and knowledgeable about where you are going. I never said that a person needs to make elaborate plans, only that you should know something about where you are going. Showing up to a strange city and just wandering around without knowing what areas are safe is foolish. You do not have to plan everything, you can be spontaneous, but still have a general idea of where you are going and what you are doing. I am going to assume that you are a man. As a woman, it is dangerous and stupid to just show up to a strange city and winging it.
No, it isn't.
 

jaklgreen

Well-Known Member
Um , Here are your words: post #142, and post #152.





Sigh. Now you say:


No, it isn't.
It is foolish to just show up to a strange city and wander around. That is great if you think otherwise. And I stand behind my statements saying that a person should research their vacations ahead of time, especially ones like WDW. It is great that you enjoy being a free spirit and that works for you. But we all know that there are plenty of people who do little to no planning, have a crappy vacation, and come here and complain about it. There is no excuse to not know these things. If you choose to vacation that way, more power to you. Not everyone is as zen about it as you are. Again, as a woman, there is no way that I would just show up somewhere without knowing what I am getting in to. I am glad you live in a different world.
 
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