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Disney Genie, Genie+ officially introduced along with confirmed details of how it will work

Jrb1979

Well-Known Member
Define cheap here. Dark rides aren’t gonna cost as much at ROTR but let’s not pretend it wouldn’t likely still be a billion dollar expense to add *multiple* ‘cheap’ dark rides to DHS.

Disney Imagineering isn’t exactly known for their cost effective enterprise and building materials have only gotten more expensive in the last few years.

The axed a freakin’ carousel due to expense, and you want to tell me Chapek gonna get in it to green light dark rides I guarantee would be more expensive to build? I just don’t see it happening. The company is focused elsewhere right now on fixing the things not making them a profit.
That's why I fell anyone that asks that Disney isn't worth it. Go to Universal, Busch Gardens or SeaWorld. Parks that respect their guests
 

RoadiJeff

Well-Known Member
At MCO leaving after 4 day trip and I have to save it was the most stressful and exhausting trip we’ve ever done. Genie+ is a complete disaster and waste of money. Up early every day and didn’t get the rides we wanted even at 7:00:01 with 3 of us on MDE. Zero incentive to stay on property. Their big pitch is resort guests get to book ILL at 7am before non resort guests and we tried 3 days in a row at 7:00:01 and got nothing for ROTR on 2 tries and FOP on the other try. Got 2 rides with genie+ and waited in 60-220 (FOP) minute lines. Why did I pay more and get less with this system? I thought if I paid and stayed in a deluxe resort I would get an advantage and it was complete opposite. My kids were exhausted getting up so early and we were all stressed about not getting our preferred rides.

we will not be back System blows.

they need an “any ride, any time” pass system for me to return. Will never do that again.
When the booking window is filled within a few seconds instead of a few minutes there are several techniques to help with getting something. The first and IMHO the most important one is having a watch that is synced to the atomic clock signal. You can then refresh the MDE page 0.25 seconds before the magic hour and tap-tap-tap-tap as quick as you can on the new box that appears. The time that shows on most smart phones can be a few seconds slow and that makes a HUGE difference when every millisecond counts.

I know that doesn't help you now but when RotR was doing virtual boarding passes I used some millisecond shortcuts as I practiced back home and usually was able to get through the system 3x down to where it told me that I did not have a ticket for that day before it said all boarding groups had been taken 8-10 seconds into the hour.
 

hopemax

Well-Known Member
Disney prides itself at letting the show determine the experience, but they don’t have that luxury anymore. They need to identify their highest capacity and *reliable* ride systems and design an experience around the ride system. The only problem is that we may end up with another Mermaid due to other underlying issues. Ideally, an experience tied to a not-top tier IP, preferably a brand new parks one. You want people to want to ride because they hear the ride is good for something they didn’t expect. But not so popular that your kid will throw a tantrum is they don’t ride.

In these respects Ratatouille is a good representative of this idea. High capacity, proven reliability at DLP and people already expect things to settle down fairly quickly in interest level once the newness wears off. They just need at least 3 of these, with a variety in ride systems, in each park.
 

Jrb1979

Well-Known Member
Yeah...I'm beside myself that leadership seems so oblivious to what made the parks/resorts so successful.
I'm not so sure that they are oblivious. I think it's more that their focus is on Disney+ instead. Since the parks are taking in the money right now due to people making up cancelled trips, they aren't worried about them right now.
 

ImperfectPixie

Well-Known Member
I'm not so sure that they are oblivious. I think it's more that their focus is on Disney+ instead. Since the parks are taking in the money right now due to people making up cancelled trips, they aren't worried about them right now.
I'm not talking about "right now" though...they've been making bad choices with the parks/resorts for years.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
Define cheap here. Dark rides aren’t gonna cost as much at ROTR but let’s not pretend it wouldn’t likely still be a billion dollar expense to add *multiple* ‘cheap’ dark rides to DHS.

Disney Imagineering isn’t exactly known for their cost effective enterprise and building materials have only gotten more expensive in the last few years.

The axed a freakin’ carousel due to expense, and you want to tell me Chapek gonna get on it to green light dark rides I guarantee would be more expensive to build? I just don’t see it happening, especially since people keep coming. There hasn’t been an attendance drop off.

The company is focused elsewhere right now on fixing the things not making them a profit.
Again with the idea that since a problem exists there should be no effort made to fix it. There is no reason $1 billion couldn’t buy 20 good attractions.

And which is? You previously claimed the reservations schemes were how they were fixing things but now you say they aren’t trying to fix anything. The Company trying to fix things is also part of the problem as these issues and their solutions are being driven by people with no experience or interest in theme parks.

My point was adding those type of rides to the parks now would help with capacity issues. They need more rides desperately, and since they don't want to spend a lot of money right now, adding in those type of rides would help with capacity.
Flat rides tend to have rather lousy capacity and they tend to be variations on a theme. Trying to add that much capacity means you will start to be repetitive. Part of what makes their all-in cost so low is that they get dropped in on concrete pads, not exactly conducive to a themed environment. They can also cause circulation problems when placed poorly, see Magic Carpets of Aladdin in Adventureland.
 

Jeff4272

Well-Known Member
When the booking window is filled within a few seconds instead of a few minutes there are several techniques to help with getting something. The first and IMHO the most important one is having a watch that is synced to the atomic clock signal. You can then refresh the MDE page 0.25 seconds before the magic hour and tap-tap-tap-tap as quick as you can on the new box that appears. The time that shows on most smart phones can be a few seconds slow and that makes a HUGE difference when every millisecond counts.

I know that doesn't help you now but when RotR was doing virtual boarding passes I used some millisecond shortcuts as I practiced back home and usually was able to get through the system 3x down to where it told me that I did not have a ticket for that day before it said all boarding groups had been taken 8-10 seconds into the hour.
I never had a problem getting a BG. Was 6 for 6 including twice at 1pm. This had to do with Disney technology being terrible
 

Casper Gutman

Well-Known Member
Define cheap here. Dark rides aren’t gonna cost as much at ROTR but let’s not pretend it wouldn’t likely still be a billion dollar expense to add *multiple* ‘cheap’ dark rides to DHS.

Disney Imagineering isn’t exactly known for their cost effective enterprise and building materials have only gotten more expensive in the last few years.

The axed a freakin’ carousel due to expense, and you want to tell me Chapek gonna get on it to green light dark rides I guarantee would be more expensive to build? I just don’t see it happening, especially since people keep coming. There hasn’t been an attendance drop off.

The company is focused elsewhere right now on fixing the things not making them a profit.
That's the problem, of course. Both Chapek and Iger see the parks as a side-business at best, a cash register at worst. They want to be movie execs, not theme park execs. For a portion of the $33 BILLION Disney just announced they would spend on streaming content in 2022 alone, WDW could be actually and truly fixed. But the Bobs can't accept that theme parks, along with animation, are the core of their brand and always will be. Those ain't sexy businesses on Wall Street.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
That's the problem, of course. Both Chapek and Iger see the parks as a side-business at best, a cash register at worst. They want to be movie execs, not theme park execs. For a portion of the $33 BILLION Disney just announced they would spend on streaming content in 2022 alone, WDW could be actually and truly fixed. But the Bobs can't accept that theme parks, along with animation, are the core of their brand and always will be. Those ain't sexy businesses on Wall Street.
They don’t want to be theme park executives but they also think anyone from that business is too stupid to be trusted running it and that the bumbling idiots need their guidance. Disney is a business that in 2006 ordered a business unit to never try and repeat a recent big success.
 

Casper Gutman

Well-Known Member
They don’t want to be theme park executives but they also think anyone from that business is too stupid to be trusted running it and that the bumbling idiots need their guidance. Disney is a business that in 2006 ordered a business unit to never try and repeat a recent big success.
What we need at CEO is a widely respected and inarguably intelligent individual who is both business savvy and intensely creative and has worked in the parks, likes them, and knows their significance and history while also having a keen grasp on film and television,

Is Steve Martin available between seasons of Only Murders in the Building?
 

bubbles1812

Well-Known Member
What we need at CEO is a widely respected and inarguably intelligent individual who is both business savvy and intensely creative and has worked in the parks, likes them, and knows their significance and history while also having a keen grasp on film and television,

Is Steve Martin available between seasons of Only Murders in the Building?
A dream is a wish your heart makes…
 

ImperfectPixie

Well-Known Member
What we need at CEO is a widely respected and inarguably intelligent individual who is both business savvy and intensely creative and has worked in the parks, likes them, and knows their significance and history while also having a keen grasp on film and television,

Is Steve Martin available between seasons of Only Murders in the Building?
I'd prefer a co-CEO team...one creative (with a love of Disney parks/resorts), one business-minded. Then there's no single ego at the top.
 

bubbles1812

Well-Known Member
Again with the idea that since a problem exists there should be no effort made to fix it. There is no reason $1 billion couldn’t buy 20 good attractions.

And which is? You previously claimed the reservations schemes were how they were fixing things but now you say they aren’t trying to fix anything. The Company trying to fix things is also part of the problem as these issues and their solutions are being driven by people with no experience or interest in theme parks.


Flat rides tend to have rather lousy capacity and they tend to be variations on a theme. Trying to add that much capacity means you will start to be repetitive. Part of what makes their all-in cost so low is that they get dropped in on concrete pads, not exactly conducive to a themed environment. They can also cause circulation problems when placed poorly, see Magic Carpets of Aladdin in Adventureland.
I never said they aren’t trying to fix anything. You yourself pointed to the fact they are adding *some* rides, just not enough, and the line skip systems are their additional way of trying to fix things. You don’t have to like them, but they are an imperfect solution to help solve a capacity problem.
 

ImperfectPixie

Well-Known Member
I never said they aren’t trying to fix anything. You yourself pointed to the fact they are adding *some* rides, just not enough, and the line skip systems are their additional way of trying to fix things. You don’t have to like them, but they are an imperfect solution to help solve a capacity problem.
At what point does continuing to invest BILLIONS into crowd management systems that fail get considered a wrong-doing to the BoD and shareholders? No one at corporate will admit it, but that's what's been happening.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
What we need at CEO is a widely respected and inarguably intelligent individual who is both business savvy and intensely creative and has worked in the parks, likes them, and knows their significance and history while also having a keen grasp on film and television,

Is Steve Martin available between seasons of Only Murders in the Building?
The head of the company doesn’t need park experience, but they need to respect the park business. Josh D’Amaro is the most experienced head of the parks in decades and even he was placed in charge of Disney’s Animal Kingdom without prior park experience. Nobody would suggest that Kevin Feige’s eventual replacement should be someone with no experience making movies who has only seen a few of Marvel’s movies and would be micromanaged by the CEO. No, they would say it should be someone with experience who appreciates the product and would be trusted to run the business.
 

Jeff4272

Well-Known Member
That's the problem, of course. Both Chapek and Iger see the parks as a side-business at best, a cash register at worst. They want to be movie execs, not theme park execs. For a portion of the $33 BILLION Disney just announced they would spend on streaming content in 2022 alone, WDW could be actually and truly fixed. But the Bobs can't accept that theme parks, along with animation, are the core of their brand and always will be. Those ain't sexy businesses on Wall Street.
Correct. NFLX trades at almost 50x multiple whereas DIS is at 30x. They want their business shift to go from 70/30 parks vs media revs to 80/20 media vs parks revs to get that higher multiple.
 

G00fyDad

Well-Known Member
At what point does continuing to invest BILLIONS into crowd management systems that fail get considered a wrong-doing to the BoD and shareholders? No one at corporate will admit it, but that's what's been happening.
As long as they can continue to come up with the next idea to suck $15 to $20 per person per day out of everyone then they have no need to do anything else. It doesn't matter if the system implodes just as G$ has. They can keep coming up with crappy ideas left and right. As long as it makes the money then that's all they care about.
 

ImperfectPixie

Well-Known Member
As long as they can continue to come up with the next idea to suck $15 to $20 per person per day out of everyone then they have no need to do anything else. It doesn't matter if the system implodes just as G$ has. They can keep coming up with crappy ideas left and right. As long as it makes the money then that's all they care about.
That's short-sighted and mismanagement. The return on investment would be significantly higher if they'd invested that money in the parks themselves by adding capacity. The experience wouldn't be suffering like it has been, they could fit MORE people into the parks, the resorts would be full, etc. etc.
 

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