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A/C Circulation in rooms

vitani88

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
This may seem like a strange question, but I'm wondering about how the air inside the resorts circulates. I know that each room has an individual thermostat, but does the air conditioning circulate between rooms/common areas, or is the air completely separate for each room? My husband wants to book a resort stay and I'm trying to determine the safety. We're looking at rooms with outside entrances rather than having to enter through the resort itself. Anyone have any insight on the a/c situation?
 

vadame007

New Member
I've been trying to figure this out myself. So far, the evidence that covid could spread from floor to floor and room to room in buildings via HVAC systems is inconclusive or unknown. I am unable to locate any peer reviewed studies regarding the matter.

If it were spread via HVAC, I would think there would have been a greater amount of cases in NY and Japan where millions live in high rise buildings.
 

DisAl

Well-Known Member
I have never encountered a room at WDW that did not have its own air handler fed by chilled / heated water from a central chiller or a through the wall ac unit. It is much easier to run water pipes than air ducts, plus if a room is unoccupied it doesn't have to be heated or cooled.
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
I have never encountered a room at WDW that did not have its own air handler fed by chilled / heated water from a central chiller or a through the wall ac unit. It is much easier to run water pipes than air ducts, plus if a room is unoccupied it doesn't have to be heated or cooled.
In the hot and humid summer of Central Florida, to turn off the AC in a vacant hotel room would not be good. Mold and mildew would accumulate.
 

bigrigross

Well-Known Member
In the hot and humid summer of Central Florida, to turn off the AC in a vacant hotel room would not be good. Mold and mildew would accumulate.

Pretty sure most rooms have a motion sensor thermostat. If it doesnt detect movement, it sets the AC temp much higher (not off) until it detects movement again and then cools the room back off to what the guest set it to. Some people use the balloon trick to keep it cold or most models have an override which can easily be turned on by hitting the buttons in a certain way.
 

Jon81uk

Well-Known Member
Most aircon filters should catch covid related droplets too, but if recirculated filtered air is a major concern to you, then I would avoid the theme parks in general where the issue of being close to other people is a much bigger risk than aircon.
 

vitani88

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Most aircon filters should catch covid related droplets too, but if recirculated filtered air is a major concern to you, then I would avoid the theme parks in general where the issue of being close to other people is a much bigger risk than aircon.

We wouldn't be going to go to the parks, but I agree!
 

larryz

My Last Trip was in 2018
Premium Member
The only common airway connections between rooms I am aware of include the hallways, connecting doors (in connecting rooms) and the bathroom vent systems.
 

mmnw

Active Member
Call and ask. Many places have to upgrade their filters or hvac. Where I live, many dental offices had to make changes in order to open. Schools are reporting if they have the funds to work on this.
 

crawale

Well-Known Member
This may seem like a strange question, but I'm wondering about how the air inside the resorts circulates. I know that each room has an individual thermostat, but does the air conditioning circulate between rooms/common areas, or is the air completely separate for each room? My husband wants to book a resort stay and I'm trying to determine the safety. We're looking at rooms with outside entrances rather than having to enter through the resort itself. Anyone have any insight on the a/c situation?
Probably best you stay home as you will meet crowds everywhere. Safety is not guaranteed anywhere and you seem particularly fearful.
 

Atlantix2000

New Member
Probably best you stay home as you will meet crowds everywhere. Safety is not guaranteed anywhere and you seem particularly fearful.
The question you're responding to was asked way back in July 2020 during the week Disney World was reopening. Air circulation was a common news topic back then and there weren't very many people even considering booking Disney trips. The risk equation is considerably different today.
 

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