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When will Galaxys Edge have Fast Pass?

Twirlnhurl

Member
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To answer the original question, I think fastpass will be introduced after Rise of the Resistance is reliably operating at full capacity, and not a minute before that. I see the lack of opening day fastpass on these attractions as a way to prevent negative press from operational challenges.

When Frozen Ever After first opened, it had Fastpass, and operationally was having issues running at full capacity. Because the number of fastpasses distributed per hour was greater than the number of riders served per hour, the standby line was closed and the fastpass line ballooned to over 90 minutes.

This happens to any fastpass ride when it experiences mechanical issues, but new rides are far more prone to them. When this happens, guest service recovery is extremely difficult, where as a long line for a new ride is understandable to everyone.

So honestly, there is no good reason to offer fastpass on any new attractions before the opening day bugs are worked out. I hope this strategy is continued in the future.
 

dreamfinder912

Well-Known Member
To answer the original question, I think fastpass will be introduced after Rise of the Resistance is reliably operating at full capacity, and not a minute before that. I see the lack of opening day fastpass on these attractions as a way to prevent negative press from operational challenges.

When Frozen Ever After first opened, it had Fastpass, and operationally was having issues running at full capacity. Because the number of fastpasses distributed per hour was greater than the number of riders served per hour, the standby line was closed and the fastpass line ballooned to over 90 minutes.

This happens to any fastpass ride when it experiences mechanical issues, but new rides are far more prone to them. When this happens, guest service recovery is extremely difficult, where as a long line for a new ride is understandable to everyone.

So honestly, there is no good reason to offer fastpass on any new attractions before the opening day bugs are worked out. I hope this strategy is continued in the future.
It's been working out beautifully at SWGE and over at Universal with Hagrid's. Hagrid's has had....well...many issues. Not the least of which being it's an outdoor attraction operating in a state with frequent thunderstorms this time of year. And the Universal version of FP is far less uh...shall we say disruptive...of standby. It's pretty much 50/50 there. We just popped into SWGE today for the hell of it and practically walked onto smugglers run. Posted time was 45 minutes, I think we waited maybe 30. And we moved at a pace where we could see the entire queue, but not memorize each detail...the line flowed smoothly and constantly.
 

Twirlnhurl

Member
It's been working out beautifully at SWGE and over at Universal with Hagrid's. Hagrid's has had....well...many issues. Not the least of which being it's an outdoor attraction operating in a state with frequent thunderstorms this time of year. And the Universal version of FP is far less uh...shall we say disruptive...of standby. It's pretty much 50/50 there. We just popped into SWGE today for the hell of it and practically walked onto smugglers run. Posted time was 45 minutes, I think we waited maybe 30. And we moved at a pace where we could see the entire queue, but not memorize each detail...the line flowed smoothly and constantly.
I couldn't agree with you more about Universal's express pass being less disruptive, although in my experience it has a much lower share of the ride capacity than 50% most of the time.
 

dreamfinder912

Well-Known Member
I couldn't agree with you more about Universal's express pass being less disruptive, although in my experience it has a much lower share of the ride capacity than 50% most of the time.
I have to admit, I don't go on all that many of the rides. Mostly Harry Potter where you skip most of the line, and things like The Mummy and MIB where the line is physically split standby to this half of the loading bay, express pass to that side. It definitely varies more. But since I only have the after 4pm express pass, I have waited standby and the lines at Universal still...move. I'm not standing there watching everyone else go.
 

Tom Morrow

Well-Known Member
In my opinion Fastpass Plus has levelled the playing field in several ways:

1. It has improved the experience for the average guest, but in order to achieve this it has made things harder for those guests who were in the know before Fastpass+ and knew how to maximise their time and the paper fastpass system.

2. It has removed guests from standby lines at E tickets and diverted them to other attractions either via Fastpass+ or into the standby lines.

3. It has increased standby waits at most C and D ticket attractions where FP+ is available, particularly the people eaters which would previously enjoy short waits most of the time.

It is essentially a rationing system that allocates ride capacity in a non-linear fashion and as such creates artificial lines where they would not exist otherwise.

I think the reason most people on these boards who dislike do so is that they were probably getting more rides than the average guest, before the introduction of Fastpass+

The new system has made multiple re-rides on the best attractions a thing of the past.
How can the playing field be level for ALL guests if resort guests have an advantage? Advanced planners in general have an advantage. With the old system, all anyone had to do was simply get there early enough, which can be accomplished by anyone who purchased a ticket.
 

justintheharris

Well-Known Member
Why? Seems like a lot of people on this thread that cant get FP at the 60 day window and thats the real problem, not the fact that it works
I can assure you that the minute all the Star Wars fastpasses are booked out and you're unable to get one, you will wish this forum called the shots on the fastpass system.
 

Twirlnhurl

Member
How can the playing field be level for ALL guests if resort guests have an advantage? Advanced planners in general have an advantage. With the old system, all anyone had to do was simply get there early enough, which can be accomplished by anyone who purchased a ticket.
Obviously resort guests have an advantage over annual passholders and day guests, who all have an advantage over first time guests in fastpas+. But legacy fastpass gave a huge advantage to people who knew the system and early arrival guests. I visited Disneyland back in February and used 11 fastpasses over the course of the day. I don't know how many fastpasses the average guest or the 10th percentile guest used, but I bet it was lower than 3. The biggest advantage of fastpass+ is that it isn't very easy to get more than 3 useful fastpasses, which makes a more level playing field than legacy fastpass. (The most level playing field will always be no fastpass, though.)
 

justintheharris

Well-Known Member
I would respectfully disagree. I would say it works for the majority of people that attend the parks. Disney has over 30,000 hotel rooms and an average of well over 100,000 people occupy those rooms. The average daily attendance for MK is approx 56,000. It does not seem to work for people that cannot get at the 60 day window. And it has worked for me since its been instituted in 1999 (and ultimately 2013 as i was part of the test pilot program for FP+ during a trip) so that is not short term. The whole reason why Disney began FP was because attendance was starting to suffer because of customer satisfaction was low because of extended wait times. So those of you that argue that wait times have gone up I have to say you are in the small minority.
No, money is the reason. Disney realized that people spending an hour in a standby queue was an hour that they were not buying food or merchandise. So they created fastpass in the late 90s so that people could get a return time and spend the wait time outside of the queue and, in theory, buying merchandise and food. Think of it as a virtual queue. It was wildly successful. In 2014, MyDisneyExperience rolled out in order to, again, make money. Disney will never get rid of MyDisneyExperience because it would get rid of the largest incentive to stay on Resort property: people being able to book fastpasses 60 days in advance.
 
I understand that people that can only get Fast Passes at the 30 day window are not going to like the system because they can never get SDMT or FOP, etc. and they have to wait in longer lines. That must be frustrating. But for the guest that comes once a year or even less frequently and stay on property, you have to admit FP is a huge home run.
I'm not in Orlando. I book 60-days out. I hate FP+. There is no home run at all. Since FP+ implementation the number of rides and attractions I can experience in a single day has significantly dropped. The days of getting in 30 attractions at Magic Kingdom are no more. I was able to do that under the previous FP implementation.

Also I get fewer rides on E-ticket attractions than before.
 

KevinPage

Well-Known Member
The current lack of FP on SR is a refreshing change

When we use FP we tend to blow through rides almost (dare I say), TOO FAST. Then you end up going “guess we have to go wait on that ride now with a long a$$ line”.

A nominal 20-30 minute wait helps build anticipation, allows you to enjoy the queue and overall provides a more even and consistent flow to your day.

FP makes me feel frantic and thinking of speed, speed, speed then wait in a giant line. FP has conditioned me (and most others) to scoff at a standby wait of more than 20 minutes, which I don’t like feeling.
 

Astrotrain

Member
There have been many times that I haven't been able to get fast passes for the big rides 60 days out (annual pass but I live on the West coast so stay at resorts). It's never bothered me, generally check to see if anything opens up occasionally or the night before and get lucky with cancellations. I'm not someone who super plans everything out though either, I take a more relaxed approach to the parks and check to see which park is emptier / has lower wait times before heading out.

I can see why fast passes could cause issues in general, from a logical standpoint. I don't think it's far fetched to be optimistic about fast passes being limited more in the future though, in the meantime there are ways to still enjoy your experience and make the best of what you have. Remember to refresh a few times before leaving the night before and you may be surprised at what 'high value' fast passes you can snag. It's not a guarantee, but I've been surprised at how many people don't think of doing that.

Saw someone asking if smuggler's run already has a FP line set up - there is a FP queue. The single rider line is to the far left of the entrance, standby to the far right and FP queue is directly to the left of the standby line. They allow rider switch passes so it's utilized for that. As others have said, FP will likely become available after Rise of the Resistance is released and things stabilize within the park. I wouldn't be surprised to see fast passes becoming available early 2020 with limited availability during peak times/dates.
 

Trackmaster

Well-Known Member
Personally, if the lines move with a high capacity ride, why bother with FP+? Lines are just part of going to any amusement park and Disney has incredibly themed queue lines on several rides. FP+ has added nothing, in my opinion. Heck. for FoP, the FP+ queue is extremely boring and has none of the cool features that you experience in the standby line. I know that it's a net-net situation, FP+ or no FP+. Same number of rides and all that. However, when the line moves consistently, people don't mind the lines.

Hopefully, I can ride both rides in SW:GE prior to the FP+ implementation.
You raise a good point that under certain circumstances, the FP+ just creates a zero-sum game situation. You just defer your waits for some lines to other lines. But that's just if you enter the park with absolutely no plan and/or you want to spend all day riding all day.

Conceivably, the FP+ creates a scenario where you can spend all week at Disney, and ride everything that needs a FP+ at least once, and you can walk onto the rides that never get lines or are just shows that they'll never help you for. So pretty much everything experience has no line at all for you, and you spend the rest of the time on shows, dining, shopping, the waterparks, seeing t he stuff around the parks, etc.

Its a great system for making sure everybody gets on what they want at least once. The system mostly falls apart when people expect re-rides.

Personally, I think that the system is great for locals too, if you're willing to be flexible. If you can snag a killer FP+ line-up, make sure to go that day. If your FP+ line-up is so-so don't bother going. Make sure that your visits are short and sweet and mostly just cover your FP+ window and only stick around if you can keep booking them, or the park is dead.

Oh yeah -- don't forget that the line aren't bad in the evening and at night. So you can prioritize FP+ in the day, and do more stand-by later.
 

Trackmaster

Well-Known Member
Yes, if I spend thousands for a week, I expect re-rides. And it's been a huge devaluing of the experience to have that reduced.
Well, I think that it makes sense to prioritize a group of guests first rides over a one week vacation, and after that, re-rides are on them. Don't forget, Extra Magic Hours and the hard ticket events are also a very important way that Disney gets rides and re-rides to people who really want them. Disney is willing to be open 365 years a years, and runs monster hours compared to most parks (when you include the EMH and the hard ticket events). Its important to take advantage of them.
 

drizgirl

Well-Known Member
Well, I think that it makes sense to prioritize a group of guests first rides over a one week vacation, and after that, re-rides are on them. Don't forget, Extra Magic Hours and the hard ticket events are also a very important way that Disney gets rides and re-rides to people who really want them. Disney is willing to be open 365 years a years, and runs monster hours compared to most parks (when you include the EMH and the hard ticket events). Its important to take advantage of them.
Yes, that's what happens when you ration rides. You have to prioritize one group over another. Over a week long trip, you should be able to re-ride things without buying additional tickets. I priced tickets for a spring trip yesterday. For our 4 person family, it was going to be over $2K just for the tickets. Don't tell me I need to pay more if I want the re-rides I got without issue (at no additional cost) just a few years ago.
 

ChipNDale79

Active Member
Just not true.......FP saves you a ton of time.......Just not for you
It saves you time on an attraction like Peter Pan, because you have a fast pass for that ride, however say you don't have a fast pass for Big Thunder and Splash, you're wait is now longer than it would have been prior to FP+.

I'm not the only one that feels that way. That seems to be a common feeling among a lot of people. Sure you get a faster ride experience on the rides you do have a fast pass for, however its made your wait longer for the ones you don't have a fast pass for.

Not to mention how mind numblingly painful it is to plain your day at a park 60 days in advance. There have been days where we wanted to be at a different park and fp+ made it really hard to do that. fast pass plus makes a vacation extremely unflexiable.

there needs to be some level of compromise from the old system and the new. I see both sides to where you shouldnt have to be at rope drop and run to an attraction to ensure youd get a fast pass on a certain ride, like it was for Toy Story for many years. You also shouldnt have to reserve them 60 days in advance.
 
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