• Welcome to the WDWMAGIC.COM Forums!
    Please take a look around, and feel free to sign up and join the community.You can use your Twitter or Facebook account to sign up, or register directly.

When will Galaxys Edge have Fast Pass?

mmcclory324

Member
Original Poster
I was looking to plan a trip for next fall (DVC members and approaching my 11 month booking window) and I was wondering if there is any precedent for when the 2 Galaxy's Edge rides, both Millennium Falcon and Rise of the Resistance, could/would be added to the Fast Pass system? Has there been any other rides in Disney's history that have opened and not been accessible by Fast Pass until a later date? Are there any examples for Universal with the Harry Potter rides? With the lack of crowds in Disneyland (and to a lesser extent Disney World despite the small sample size) I wonder if Disney will make them available sooner rather than later. Any feedback appreciated.
 

mmcclory324

Member
Original Poster
I'd rather have every line I wait in be constantly moving and shorter than have a short wait for some and a sluggish, artificially inflated wait time for others. Especially since Fastpasses for certain rides are very hard to get now.
Unfortunately, not reality, even without Fast Pass
 

mmcclory324

Member
Original Poster
Hopefully never. Notice how MFSR has a shorter wait than Flight of Passage? It's because of the lack of Fastpass.
I understand that a lot of people on these boards are annual passholders without hotel reservations and/or Florida residents and visit the park without being able to book at the 60 day window and that makes it a lot more frustrating.
 
  • Like
Reactions: CAV

Tom Morrow

Well-Known Member
Unfortunately, not reality, even without Fast Pass
You may not be familiar with the actual numbers behind Fastpass. Disney distributes enough Fastpasses to fill 75% to 80% of any attraction's capacity. This means that for popular attractions, 80$ of the seats are being filled from the Fastpass line at most times. It's why Spaceship Earth used to always be walk-on or practically walk-on and now it often has a significant wait. Whenever you're stuck in a slow moving standby lne next to a Fastpass line, pay attention to how fast the Fastpass line actually moves. If there were only one line, it would move even faster than that.
 

Tom Morrow

Well-Known Member
Also, because both Star Wars attractions will be coveted Fastpass choices for quite some time, it means that if they initiate Fastpass, our options will be to fight for those hard to get Fastpasses (just like we still have to for Flight of Passage) or wait in lines that are longer than they are now.
 

mmcclory324

Member
Original Poster
Also, because both Star Wars attractions will be coveted Fastpass choices for quite some time, it means that if they initiate Fastpass, our options will be to fight for those hard to get Fastpasses (just like we still have to for Flight of Passage) or wait in lines that are longer than they are now.
I understand the numbers. Let me try to explain. For eg., i went to AK a month after FOP opened. Standby time was 180 mins. I had FP for it and waited 20. If there were no FP for FOP, how long do you think standby times would be? It wouldnt be 60, it would still be 120+ because of ride capacity. So i would rather be able to get the FP at the 60 day mark and wait 20 mins as it will still save time.
 

Tom Morrow

Well-Known Member
I understand the numbers. Let me try to explain. For eg., i went to AK a month after FOP opened. Standby time was 180 mins. I had FP for it and waited 20. If there were no FP for FOP, how long do you think standby times would be? It wouldnt be 60, it would still be 120+ because of ride capacity. So i would rather be able to get the FP at the 60 day mark and wait 20 mins as it will still save time.
Think what you want. Every single cast member who has ever worked at a Fastpass attraction will tell you that Fastpass drastically artificially inflates the standby wait time.
 

Tom Morrow

Well-Known Member
Disney created the Fastpass system for their own benefit because it results in people spending more money in shops and restaurants, and now, it encourages staying on property and advanced booking. The result is the consumer, us, has to do more steps (and even more with Fastpass+) to experience the same amount of attractions that we would be able to if the system didn't exist at all.

I've seen many people over the years do crazy mental gymnastics rather than accept that Fastpass is detrimental to the experience - yet we all have to use it to get our money's worth.
 

marni1971

WDW History nut
Premium Member
Disney created the Fastpass system for their own benefit because it results in people spending more money in shops and restaurants, and now, it encourages staying on property and advanced booking. The result is the consumer, us, has to do more steps (and even more with Fastpass+) to experience the same amount of attractions that we would be able to if the system didn't exist at all.

I've seen many people over the years do crazy mental gymnastics rather than accept that Fastpass is detrimental to the experience - yet we all have to use it to get our money's worth.
 

mmcclory324

Member
Original Poster
You may not be familiar with the actual numbers behind Fastpass. Disney distributes enough Fastpasses to fill 75% to 80% of any attraction's capacity. This means that for popular attractions, 80$ of the seats are being filled from the Fastpass line at most times. It's why Spaceship Earth used to always be walk-on or practically walk-on and now it often has a significant wait. Whenever you're stuck in a slow moving standby lne next to a Fastpass line, pay attention to how fast the Fastpass line actually moves. If there were only one line, it would move even faster than that.
What FastPass does is to take a ride’s operational hourly capacity and do some simple math. If a ride can realistically accommodate 1,000 riders each hour, then it essentially has 1,000 slots to fill with riders between 10:00 and 11:00; another 1,000 from 11:00 – 12:00, another from 12:00 – 1:00. The FastPass system “sets aside” a percentage of those slots (for some rides, reportedly up to 70%) to be reserved. So for each hour, 70 riders would be FP and 30 stand by. Not having FP doesnt increase the capacity. The ride can still only hold 1,000 per hour and by putting all of those people in the stand bye queue doesn't shrink the wait time by a significant amount
 

Tom Morrow

Well-Known Member
What FastPass does is to take a ride’s operational hourly capacity and do some simple math. If a ride can realistically accommodate 1,000 riders each hour, then it essentially has 1,000 slots to fill with riders between 10:00 and 11:00; another 1,000 from 11:00 – 12:00, another from 12:00 – 1:00. The FastPass system “sets aside” a percentage of those slots (for some rides, reportedly up to 70%) to be reserved. So for each hour, 70 riders would be FP and 30 stand by. Not having FP doesnt increase the capacity. The ride can still only hold 1,000 per hour and by putting all of those people in the stand bye queue doesn't shrink the wait time by a significant amount
Yes, a ride's capacity is fixed - assuming they don't remove vehicles or whatever. So let's use Expedition Everest as an example. It can move just about 2,000 riders per hour. Let's say there was only one line for it. You queue up, and about 500 people are ahead of you. This means you will be on the ride in about 15-20 minutes. But, then we add in a second line which 80% of the attraction's capacity is devoted to. Over the course of one hour, about 1,600 riders enter through the Fastpass queue. Most of them queued up in the Fastpass queue after you queued up in the Standby queue, yet almost all of them will ride before you. So now you are waiting for 2,100 people to ride before you get to ride, resulting in over an hour wait.

This is where people point out that those Fastpass users would just be in the standby line, making it the same wait time. But they aren't accounting for the fact that the current setup allows for 80% of the ride's capacity to queue up after you yet ride before you - a situation that would not be physically possible with one line. "But the standby line would be physically longer since more people would be in it!" - not if it's moving 80% faster.
 

mmcclory324

Member
Original Poster
Yes, a ride's capacity is fixed - assuming they don't remove vehicles or whatever. So let's use Expedition Everest as an example. It can move just about 2,000 riders per hour. Let's say there was only one line for it. You queue up, and about 500 people are ahead of you. This means you will be on the ride in about 15-20 minutes. But, then we add in a second line which 80% of the attraction's capacity is devoted to. Over the course of one hour, about 1,600 riders enter through the Fastpass queue. Most of them queued up in the Fastpass queue after you queued up in the Standby queue, yet almost all of them will ride before you. So now you are waiting for 2,100 people to ride before you get to ride, resulting in over an hour wait.

This is where people point out that those Fastpass users would just be in the standby line, making it the same wait time. But they aren't accounting for the fact that the current setup allows for 80% of the ride's capacity to queue up after you yet ride before you - a situation that would not be physically possible with one line. "But the standby line would be physically longer since more people would be in it!" - not if it's moving 80% faster.
When you are in line and there are 500 people in front of you and 1500 behind you, how long does the 1998th person have to wait?
 
Top Bottom