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TWDC FY 2019 Q1 Earnings

seascape

Well-Known Member
I do not like parks and resorts being included with consumer experiences and products. A 10% increase in profits on a 5% increase in revenues makes it look like most of that was due to Parks and Resort but we can not be 100% sure. Domestic parks did well but international were down a bit.
 

the.dreamfinder

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
I do not like parks and resorts being included with consumer experiences and products. A 10% increase in profits on a 5% increase in revenues makes it look like most of that was due to Parks and Resort but we can not be 100% sure. Domestic parks did well but international were down a bit.
Also, no mention of domestic parks attendance did in the quarter. Curious they mention higher domestic room occupancy numbers as Disney was dumping deeply discounted rooms during the quarter on Priceline and other discount travel sites.
 

the.dreamfinder

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Bob just said don’t expect huge marketing for Galaxy’s Edge.
A wise decision. Best to under promise and over deliver. They’ve really underplayed RotR in their marketing materials thus far.

But how do they deal with the Batuu Travel Agency?
 

seascape

Well-Known Member
Also, no mention of domestic parks attendance did in the quarter. Curious they mention higher domestic room occupancy numbers as Disney was dumping deeply discounted rooms during the quarter on Priceline and other discount travel sites.
Listening to the call it appears all the increase came from the domestic parks. Foreign parks were down and so were consumer products. Therefore domestic parks revenues were actually up more than ticket prices. The 3% increase in hotel occupancy probably resulted in a small increase in attendance and half the 10% increase in profits. The half came from ticket price increases and hotel rate increases.
 

the.dreamfinder

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Listening to the call it appears all the increase came from the domestic parks. Foreign parks were down and so were consumer products. Therefore domestic parks revenues were actually up more than ticket prices. The 3% increase in hotel occupancy probably resulted in a small increase in attendance and half the 10% increase in profits. The half came from ticket price increases and hotel rate increases.
But it’s so weird they hesitate to say there was any attendance increase. It’s all about income and increased revenue.
Parks, Experiences, & Consumer Products revenues for the quarter increased 5% to $6.8 billion and segment operating income increased 10% to $2.2 billion. Operating income growth for the quarter was due to an increase at our domestic theme parks and resorts, partially offset by a decrease from licensing activities.
Operating income growth at our domestic theme parks and resorts was due to increased guest spending and higher occupied room nights. Guest spending growth was due to higher average ticket prices, an increase in food, beverage and merchandise spending and higher average hotel room rates.
 

seascape

Well-Known Member
But it’s so weird they hesitate to say there was any attendance increase. It’s all about income and increased revenue.
They don't release their attendance numbers, except to Fox because of their Pandora contract and only Animal Kingdom. Universal on the otherhand has to give Marvel their actual numbers and the same to Fox. Universal can't keep their real themepark numbers from Disney.
 

smile

Well-Known Member
Sure Bob, the EA-Star Wars deal’s working out really well.
have a real hard time going with bob on that one specifically...
what with no things, eh things, and/or european court appearances over micro-transactions lol

disagree on his views regarding publishing, generally, but understand -
but what's more synergy-y in an age where entertainment ensnares entire lives than pairing a powerful ip with a great game?
 

the.dreamfinder

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
To Bob's credit he acknowledges that Disney has simply failed (over and over again) in the computer gaming market.
Maybe don’t have it run by Consumer Products. Gaming isn’t some toy to be sold alongside something else, but a medium unto itself like Movies or TV (or theme parks) and should be under Studio Entertainment. That’s not to say they should make all their games in house; a mix between internal development and trusted partners would be best.

A great history of Disney’s long, tortured history in gaming.
 

The Empress Lilly

Well-Known Member
To Bob's credit he acknowledges that Disney has simply failed (over and over again) in the computer gaming market.
There was a brief moment in the early nineties when the home console market had some really great Disney games. Castle of Illusion, Quackshot. I remember that Eisner was taken aback at how little difference in animation quality there was anymore between games and animated tv / movies.
 

brb1006

Well-Known Member
There was a brief moment in the early nineties when the home console market had some really great Disney games. Castle of Illusion, Quackshot. I remember that Eisner was taken aback at how little difference in animation quality there was anymore between games and animated tv / movies.
Capcom made the best Disney licensed games during the 90s. Especially the Magical Quest series.
 

The Empress Lilly

Well-Known Member
Maybe don’t have it run by Consumer Products. Gaming isn’t some toy to be sold alongside something else, but a medium unto itself like Movies or TV (or theme parks) and should be under Studio Entertainment. That’s not to say they should make all their games in house; a mix between internal development and trusted partners would be best.

A great history of Disney’s long, tortured history in gaming.
Exactly. As usual, TWDC thinks the quality of the IP decides the quality of the product. But you can't just push Star Wars or Tangled to a developer, make them design some game around them, and try to push it on the market. That doesn't even work for theme parks, a market much less concerned with street credibility and smart audiences.
 
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