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TSA issues ? UPDATE 1/25 NY now shutting down

tractorm3

Active Member
Original Poster
I am leaving next week and just wondering if people have seen significantly extended times for TSA in airports? I am leaving from Logan and flying to MCO.

So just saw the FAA is not halting many incoming flights to some major airports in NY and NJ. If we get stuck do we have any options with disney?
 
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Weather_Lady

Well-Known Member
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I'm afraid it depends on the airport, the time of day, and the callout numbers for that particular day. (It appears that those numbers are increasing as TSA screeners get to the point where they have to take other jobs to make ends meet, but as you've probably seen in the news, the TSA is discouraging airports from sharing that information with the public, and is instructing them to issue statements saying in essence, "everything is just fine, business as usual, nothing to see here," regardless of whether it's really fine or not.)

Just to be safe and to account for a worst-case scenario, give yourself an extra hour and you won't have to be stressed if the line is longer than expected. Also, extend every kindness you can to the TSA employees with whom you interact: they can really use it right now!
 
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yensid67

Well-Known Member
I am going to go with the 26+ hour travel time.;)
Depends on where you live! But I don't like flying, if ya hit the ground at 500mph from 30,000...that's gonna leave a scratch! At least with ground transportation, you will have a better chance of surviving if something happens!
 

Weather_Lady

Well-Known Member
Depends on where you live! But I don't like flying, if ya hit the ground at 500mph from 30,000...that's gonna leave a scratch! At least with ground transportation, you will have a better chance of surviving if something happens!
I might have scoffed at this before given the fairly good safety record that air travel enjoys. However, in light of how the TSA, air traffic controllers and FAA inspectors are presently stretched to their limits, your point is well-taken. My family has long planned - and already paid-for - a trip to Florida over February break this year, and my husband and I are weighing the pros and cons of forfeiting the $1200 we've paid in airfare and driving down with the kids instead, given our insecurity about air safety during the government shutdown, which will undoubtedly get worse as we get into February. I'm sure I sound like an alarmist, but it's only a matter of time before the shutdown-induced labor shortage causes a major air disaster, or else terrorists accept our glaring invitation to strike our air transportation system during a time when our vulnerability is being broadcast on every news station. I pray that our government reopens before then.
 
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CaptainAmerica

Premium Member
I know it doesn't help you this close to your travel time, but next time consider flying out of Providence, Hartford, or Manchester.
 

LAKid53

Official Member of the Mean Girls Cult
Premium Member
Read earlier this AM that TSA plans a MAJOR walkout this Wednesday. Will make flying such a joy......

Otherwise, it will depend on the airport and how many TSA employees are out "sick" and will end up quitting as they've found a paying job. I know at several airports, entire sections/concourses have closed. I'd google to see which airports are currently affected. It will only spread as the shutdown drags on.

Thank goodness I'm only a 4 hour drive away.
 

DisneyOutsider

Well-Known Member
Depends on where you live! But I don't like flying, if ya hit the ground at 500mph from 30,000...that's gonna leave a scratch! At least with ground transportation, you will have a better chance of surviving if something happens!
Air travel is safer than trains by several orders of magnitude... But with that being said, they're both very safe modes of travel.
 

LAKid53

Official Member of the Mean Girls Cult
Premium Member
Air travel is safer than trains by several orders of magnitude... But with that being said, they're both very safe modes of travel.
According to a study I read, you could fly every day on a different flight for 2,000 years and never be involved in a crash. Your chances are like 1 in several billion.
 

Rob562

Well-Known Member
I'd prefer to see the current situation resolved and everyone back at work being paid, but on a slightly selfish note, I'm glad I have TSA Precheck for my flight to MCO this Saturday... From Boston, actually. I'll let you know my experience and what I see.

-Rob
 

captnblue

Active Member
Read earlier this AM that TSA plans a MAJOR walkout this Wednesday. Will make flying such a joy......
I can't say I blame them. I fly out at 11:56pm on Tues... I think since it's late it might not be too affected. We will see.
 

tractorm3

Active Member
Original Poster
Rob, Thanks! A report i saw from BOS from last sat said wait times in normal security check did not exceed 25 min? Our flight is leaving BOS at 5:45 am so i dont think in any case we will be held up. however, on the way home our flight is at rush hour, leaving MCO at around 4 pm.
I'd prefer to see the current situation resolved and everyone back at work being paid, but on a slightly selfish note, I'm glad I have TSA Precheck for my flight to MCO this Saturday... From Boston, actually. I'll let you know my experience and what I see.

-Rob
 

Master Yoda

Pro Star Wars geek.
Premium Member
According to a study I read, you could fly every day on a different flight for 2,000 years and never be involved in a crash. Your chances are like 1 in several billion.
...and odds are that you would survive the crash.
 

LAKid53

Official Member of the Mean Girls Cult
Premium Member
...and odds are that you would survive the crash.
Depends of the type of crash. Dad was an aeronautical engineer with over 40 years of experience in the business, both at a manufacturer and major carrier. Trust me, every airline incident we were given a detailed analysis, whether we wanted it or not. Which is why flying with him was an experience. "The pilot is extending the flaps too soon!" The only time I ever saw real concern in his eyes was a very rough flight on a Lockheed Electra turboprop from London to Edinborough.
 

Master Yoda

Pro Star Wars geek.
Premium Member
Depends of the type of crash. Dad was an aeronautical engineer with over 40 years of experience in the business, both at a manufacturer and major carrier. Trust me, every airline incident we were given a detailed analysis, whether we wanted it or not. Which is why flying with him was an experience. "The pilot is extending the flaps too soon!" The only time I ever saw real concern in his eyes was a very rough flight on a Lockheed Electra turboprop from London to Edinborough.
This is true for pretty much every crash statistic.

In most cases something like accidentally bumping into the car in front of you at a stop sign at 1 MPH carries the same statistical weight as driving a bus load of passengers off the side of a cliff. Both are classified as a "crash" but they have very different outcomes.

Plane crashes are no different. Many incidents are quite minor...they bump into something on the runway while heading to the terminal or a bird flies into the engine while they are waiting for take off. Neither have a very high chance for a loss of life, but they are still the same from a statistical point of view as a wing flying off at 30k and plummeting into the middle of the Pacific.

However, even some crashes that could have and, by all probability, should have ended with a 100% fatality rate did not. This is largely due to all of the redundant systems and training that air crews get that us normal civilian drivers most likely never experience.

I am sure you remember Aloha Flight 243 where the top of the plane over first class flew off at 24k feet. The pilot landed the plan and there was only one fatality.

 

LAKid53

Official Member of the Mean Girls Cult
Premium Member
This is true for pretty much every crash statistic.

In most cases something like accidentally bumping into the car in front of you at a stop sign at 1 MPH carries the same statistical weight as driving a bus load of passengers off the side of a cliff. Both are classified as a "crash" but they have very different outcomes.

Plane crashes are no different. Many incidents are quite minor...they bump into something on the runway while heading to the terminal or a bird flies into the engine while they are waiting for take off. Neither have a very high chance for a loss of life, but they are still the same from a statistical point of view as a wing flying off at 30k and plummeting into the middle of the Pacific.

However, even some crashes that could have and, by all probability, should have ended with a 100% fatality rate did not. This is largely due to all of the redundant systems and training that air crews get that us normal civilian drivers most likely never experience.

I am sure you remember Aloha Flight 243 where the top of the plane over first class flew off at 24k feet. The pilot landed the plan and there was only one fatality.

Of course. And all 737s were grounded after that to check for metal fatigue.
 

LAKid53

Official Member of the Mean Girls Cult
Premium Member
ATC is a highly stressful job. And now add to that worries about paying the mortgage, heating bill, feeding the family. Many are driving for Uber/Lyft and waiting tables before/after shift to earn money. Frankly, I'd rather a traffic controller be out sick than sit at their station stressed, tired and depressed.
 
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