Tokyo Disneyland Resort Expansion

tanc

Well-Known Member
No, no it’s not the only reason whatsoever. The recent yen conversion merely modified an already inherently cheaper park visit.

Magic Kingdom at $160 ish vs Tokyo at $65ish is most definitely not fully explained by this current rate conversion.
It does explain it.


Yen retains its value in Japan, if you had a Japanese salary you'd be paying much more for a ticket than they used to be.


These are previous prices before the major price increase.
 

BrianLo

Well-Known Member
It does explain it.


Yen retains its value in Japan, if you had a Japanese salary you'd be paying much more for a ticket than they used to be.


These are previous prices before the major price increase.

Over two decades, WDW ticket prices are up 200%, after accounting for inflation, in a 20 year period. Tokyo's ticket prices have also increased, but not to the same margin. More on order of 150%.

Just looking at a 10 year window - which is more favourable to your argument when most of the Tokyo price increases has occurred - Tokyo Is up 125% from the base ticket pricing, or up to 150% on the peak days. Magic Kingdom 140% on base day pricing, 210% on peak days. Most favourably Animal Kingdom is only 125% on its cheapest days to 180% on its peak days.

To both of the arguments here, the cheaper pricing in Tokyo is half currency conversion, but also half to do with Tokyo's pricing not keeping pace with US. I think this is a rare window of opportunity for Tokyo, because I fully expect it will be narrowing that gap given a surge in demand and WDW has slowed down on ticket increases due to reaching a breaking point. I also doubt the extreme currency advantage will continue to hold indefinitely.
 

BrianLo

Well-Known Member
The obvious out of the way, the expansion looks great and visibly high quality.

I think the hotel is atrocious and gaudy, but there is 300% more effort put into the guest facing portion of the hotel from the land. It's 'fine' as a result. As I suspected, I really don't think the hotel is going to be visible from ground level below the tree line. At least not the back section where the hotel has no balconies and is flat/boring/ugly.

I'm also going to stick my neck out and and say the Frozen land in Hong Kong is way more photogenic. They needed to extend the rock work, behind the castle proper. As would be movie consistent. The mountain backdrop is to Hong Kong's massive favour (obviously not the case for Paris).

While I am beyond certain the ride will be high(er) quality and the food hall venue empirically provides a lot more to the land; this is NOT stylistically or to scale with what belongs in Disneyland or Hong Kong Disneyland. That's not to the design standards of either park and I think a lot of people really don't understand the nuanced difference between these very differently designed parks.

Which is ok. There is plenty of room for quaint and charming versus hyper realism and larger scaling in the comparison's of California's Disneyland versus Tokyo's Disney Sea. Both have their obvious merits and benefits, both are beautiful in their own way. Plopping in something designed for Disney Sea into Disneyland would be quite egregious. I guess if Disneyland Forward just wants to eschew the park it is attached to entirely.
 

mickEblu

Well-Known Member
The obvious out of the way, the expansion looks great and visibly high quality.

I think the hotel is atrocious and gaudy, but there is 300% more effort put into the guest facing portion of the hotel from the land. It's 'fine' as a result. As I suspected, I really don't think the hotel is going to be visible from ground level below the tree line. At least not the back section where the hotel has no balconies and is flat/boring/ugly.

I'm also going to stick my neck out and and say the Frozen land in Hong Kong is way more photogenic. They needed to extend the rock work, behind the castle proper. As would be movie consistent. The mountain backdrop is to Hong Kong's massive favour (obviously not the case for Paris).

While I am beyond certain the ride will be high(er) quality and the food hall venue empirically provides a lot more to the land; this is NOT stylistically or to scale with what belongs in Disneyland or Hong Kong Disneyland. That's not to the design standards of either park and I think a lot of people really don't understand the nuanced difference between these very differently designed parks.

Which is ok. There is plenty of room for quaint and charming versus hyper realism and larger scaling in the comparison's of California's Disneyland versus Tokyo's Disney Sea. Both have their obvious merits and benefits, both are beautiful in their own way. Plopping in something designed for Disney Sea into Disneyland would be quite egregious. I guess if Disneyland Forward just wants to eschew the park it is attached to entirely.

Agree mostly but GE shows they don’t really care about the scale difference and World of Frozen would be even further from Disneyland proper and the berm.
 

denyuntilcaught

Well-Known Member
I have two questions:
  1. Sorry if I missed it, but has anyone measured the distance from DisneySea front gates to Frozen, tucked in the far back of Fantasy Springs? Seems INCREDIBLY far so I'm just curious.
  2. Beyond encroaching further into the parking areas like they're doing with the Space Mountain redo, where else can the resort expand its parks?
 

MerlinTheGoat

Well-Known Member
News outlets are picking up again , On Tokyo’s Version of Splash Mountain retheme.

🙃🙃🙃.

Tokyo Didnt opt for Tiana….that doesnt mean that it wont get rethemed at some point.
Where? I've looked and I haven't found anything.
While I haven't heard anything either way, the odds of this happening seem extremely low to me. From what I gather, Disney can't force the OLC to change an attraction that they don't wish to change. And I've seen zero evidence that they want to change it. Much like the US variants, the ride is enormously popular over there and pushes a lot of merch, plus there's a connecting restaurant at that brings in even more revenue.

Unlike in the US, there is absolutely no negativity surrounding the IP at all. OLC is also not going to replace a ride just because it offends a small handful of Americans. They've ignored a number of other PC changes made to other Disney parks, such as the turntables and auction scene in POTC (even though they did add Jack Sparrow to the ride). And with no concerns about the ride's popularity that would make them want to consider it either, there's no incentive for them to bother.

It's safe to assume they'll probably never replace it with PATF at the very least. Nor is that IP likely to ever receive a major attraction at all. The film flopped hard in Japan and remains unpopular there to this day. They've apparently never sold any PATF merch at TDL. And unless i'm mistaken, Tiana and Naveen have never appeared as live characters either. The one and only reference to the film was finally added as a painted decal to one of their New Orleans buildings last year. And it's even actually pretty tastefully and elegantly done to properly fit its surroundings, especially compared to those tacky barn murals at WDW-

1709153496877.jpeg
 

ThemeParkTraveller

Well-Known Member
I have two questions:
  1. Sorry if I missed it, but has anyone measured the distance from DisneySea front gates to Frozen, tucked in the far back of Fantasy Springs? Seems INCREDIBLY far so I'm just curious.
  2. Beyond encroaching further into the parking areas like they're doing with the Space Mountain redo, where else can the resort expand its parks?

1. Roughly 1.15km in a straight line.

2. TDS has one more expansion pad (the original location of the Frozen land) beside Lost River Delta. Other than that, there's limited space to expand on TDR property without repurposing existing areas or reclaiming new land.
 

BasiltheBatLord

Well-Known Member
The obvious out of the way, the expansion looks great and visibly high quality.

I think the hotel is atrocious and gaudy, but there is 300% more effort put into the guest facing portion of the hotel from the land. It's 'fine' as a result. As I suspected, I really don't think the hotel is going to be visible from ground level below the tree line. At least not the back section where the hotel has no balconies and is flat/boring/ugly.

I'm also going to stick my neck out and and say the Frozen land in Hong Kong is way more photogenic. They needed to extend the rock work, behind the castle proper. As would be movie consistent. The mountain backdrop is to Hong Kong's massive favour (obviously not the case for Paris).

While I am beyond certain the ride will be high(er) quality and the food hall venue empirically provides a lot more to the land; this is NOT stylistically or to scale with what belongs in Disneyland or Hong Kong Disneyland. That's not to the design standards of either park and I think a lot of people really don't understand the nuanced difference between these very differently designed parks.

Which is ok. There is plenty of room for quaint and charming versus hyper realism and larger scaling in the comparison's of California's Disneyland versus Tokyo's Disney Sea. Both have their obvious merits and benefits, both are beautiful in their own way. Plopping in something designed for Disney Sea into Disneyland would be quite egregious. I guess if Disneyland Forward just wants to eschew the park it is attached to entirely.
My contrarian take on Fantasy Springs is that if TDS was located in America, most people on these forums would be complaining about this expansion. "They're shoving IP into DisneySea!"

I'm refraining from looking at all the photos/videos so I can experience spoiler free this summer.
 

Supersnow84

Well-Known Member
while I said I feel sorry for HK I do agree that frozen in HK better fits HK as a Disneyland clone rather than TDS frozen which better fits the fact that Tokyo is a magic kingdom clone

The only one of the 6 resorts that doesn’t neatly fall into the distinction between the two is Paris and Paris frozen isn’t even in Parc Disneyland so it doesn’t really matter anyway

TDS frozen is playing into Tokyo’s grandeur (like Florida and Shanghai) while Hong Kong is playing into its quaintness (like Disneyland), HK just suffers because it’s also its premiere land in a park that up till recently has been seriously struggling

I also think that HK’s mountain backdrop does wonders for it
 

fradz

Well-Known Member
My contrarian take on Fantasy Springs is that if TDS was located in America, most people on these forums would be complaining about this expansion. "They're shoving IP into DisneySea!"
I think this is a good remark and I want to add my 2 cents.

Context:
Overall, DisneySea is the park with the least amount of IPs. Toy story, Indiana Jones, Little Mermaid, Nemo, a few others for small things. Out of all of these, Nemo feels most out of place (and most "US-like shoved in your mouth because you want IP ") because it was an integration of an IP into an originally non IP attraction. The others? I don't even notice it's an IP (ok TSM also...).

Good/Bad:
Is Fantasy Springs an obvious attempt at attracting more kids to an adult centric park? Yes
Does it belong in the rest of the park's overall feel? I'd argue no
Did they pick IP's that will stand the test of time ("Timeless" as Bob 2 liked to say) ? Yes
Did they do their best with it? Looks like yes so far, except for the hotel I guess
Overall, do I welcome the addition as a park goer? Yes, and also because it's in a separate area from the park; so the original Disney Sea experience remains the same, and I have a few extra rides I can do in a new fantasyland that I can "park hop to" without leaving the park
 

Supersnow84

Well-Known Member
I wonder if they could have made it a land that straddles both parks, putting a Disneyland entrance in toontown

A ticket to either park gets you entrance to fantasy springs and you just have to show your respective park ticket when you return to the park you currently have a ticket for

It already feels like a land that is both too large to be an expansion but too small to be a third gate so putting it as both parks 1.5 gate would be interesting, considering it basically marries the two parks themes
 

BrianLo

Well-Known Member
I wonder if they could have made it a land that straddles both parks, putting a Disneyland entrance in toontown

A ticket to either park gets you entrance to fantasy springs and you just have to show your respective park ticket when you return to the park you currently have a ticket for

It already feels like a land that is both too large to be an expansion but too small to be a third gate so putting it as both parks 1.5 gate would be interesting, considering it basically marries the two parks themes

For crowd control purposes, I don't believe they have brought back park hopping or really intend to. Even pre-pandemic, your first two days of a multi-day ticket were only one park per day. Only on day 3(+) could one hop. A land that could be doubly accessed would be their literal nightmare. I get the rough idea though, but it's logistically not a good one.
 

Supersnow84

Well-Known Member
For crowd control purposes, I don't believe they have brought back park hopping or really intend to. Even pre-pandemic, your first two days of a multi-day ticket were only one park per day. Only on day 3(+) could one hop. A land that could be doubly accessed would be their literal nightmare. I get the rough idea though, but it's logistically not a good one.
Since the ticket would only have to be checked when departing fantasy springs would it really be a problem, like you just scan your ticket at the sea gate and you’ll either get waved through or told “sorry this is a Disneyland day for you”

I’m not advocating for a single ticket to allow you to park hop by passing through fantasy springs, just more having fantasy springs as a “neutral zone” that’s functionally in both parks at once
 

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