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The Big Difference

eliza61nyc

Well-Known Member
We should be able to visit the past without feeling like we are hoarders or people unable to fit into the world of new technology. It was those now obsolete personal, in your home, media that got many of us hooked, but others feel that now that you can push a button on your computer that we should completely abandon and destroy our past and embrace the new that we can touch via that same computer button. Just not the same thing. After I'm dead I'm sure my family will just find the closest dumpster for my 30+ years of collecting those memories. At that point I will probably be fine with it. I still feel that their lives are much colder due to that attitude.
oh absolutely and I've got scrap books, old pictures and 8 mm tapes galore but Goofy, we're not talking about individual mementos per se. We are talking about a business marketing tool (and those dvd's were not some special gift, they were a marketing tool) so the question becomes does one keep producing something that holds value to a smaller and smaller demographic.
I liken it to picture taking in general. When I started I use to have the old 35 mm film camera, then we progressed to digital and now the technology on cameras is becoming so great that many folks simply whip out the old cell phone.
Yes there is a small group that still uses analog 35 mm cameras, I took a photography class that specifically used them so people would learn the functions on a camera but the reality is, its not a popular technology

It's not really a cold attitude but imagine if every generation was required to keep all the previous ancestors stuff. My late husband collected signed sports,
memorabilia 20211019_152258.jpg
It'd all over the basement. The reality is the kids don't want it. They have fabulous memories of football, baseball and basketball games with their dad but what are they going to do with this junk?20211019_152316.jpg
20211019_152309.jpg
 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
oh absolutely and I've got scrap books, old pictures and 8 mm tapes galore but Goofy, we're not talking about individual mementos per se. We are talking about a business marketing tool (and those dvd's were not some special gift, they were a marketing tool) so the question becomes does one keep producing something that holds value to a smaller and smaller demographic.
I liken it to picture taking in general. When I started I use to have the old 35 mm film camera, then we progressed to digital and now the technology on cameras is becoming so great that many folks simply whip out the old cell phone.
Yes there is a small group that still uses analog 35 mm cameras, I took a photography class that specifically used them so people would learn the functions on a camera but the reality is, its not a popular technology

It's not really a cold attitude but imagine if every generation was required to keep all the previous ancestors stuff. My late husband collected signed sports,
I don't have a problem with sentiment, nor am I a hoarder of any sort. But like people that collect stamps I collected those. I know they are marketing items used to draw me in and what I am saying is that they did. They drew me in hook, line and sinker. They might not have had the same affect on you and I don't know why they should. This is personal to me. I felt closer to them for whatever foolish reason it might have been. The idea that a place that even back then merchandised everything was sending me pictures, motion pictures, of my favorite place and for once didn't charge me a nickel for it. I can go back and see snippets of things that no longer exist and it is in my personal possession. I remember my grandchildren watching that particular DVD over and over again. I watched them smile, laugh at Dave and talk to each other about how they wanted to see that or no they didn't because it was to scary. Those are memories of Disney that happened in my living room. They mean something to me on a much deeper level than a website that I only have to click on to see. It was a part of my life that is way in the past and will never return. Call me a sentimental old fool if you like, but for a guy that they have called emotionless for most of my adult life they are golden. Even if they are worthless to everyone else.
 
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Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
I'd say, it depends on how it's delivered. You can deliver personalized elements to a video (log into the planning app/site, follow a questionnaire, capture that data and apply it to your personal planning portal). Now on the flip, if you're just downloading some rando stream off a 3rd party, than yes you're correct. But building that same connection with a personalized interactive digital experience is going to deliver the same experience without the material overhead. It just won't sit on a shelf collecting dust after. It's also going to be more dynamic and not limited to the confines of a pre-published DVD. But yeah, it all comes down to how it's delivered.

I think I've had a DVD shipped once or twice. Can't say it ever did anything for me and pretty sure it eventually just got tossed. Now, when the magic bands would come in, different story. Definitely some excitement and building anticipation there.
Yup, there is nothing more personal then the feel of cold buttons on a keyboard. You may find answering questionnaires that probably are designed to fish for a commitment is a personal connection but I do not. In fact, nothing is less personal then a cyber connection. It is just electronic pulses with no faces.
 

John park hopper

Well-Known Member
My time in Vietnam I purchased a reel to reel tape deck, you could put 4 or 5 albums on a tape had like 40 tapes, had a turn table for vinyl records . Hurricane Hugo hit and flooded the house and destroyed everything tapes, records etc. Kept it all in boxes for years just couldn't part with it finally trashed it all. Still have a cassette player and a lot of cassettes. VHS Disney movie tapes from when my boys were little. Break out the VHS when the granddaughters are here
 

TotallyBiased

Well-Known Member
Yup, there is nothing more personal then the feel of cold buttons on a keyboard. You may find answering questionnaires that probably are designed to fish for a commitment is a personal connection but I do not. In fact, nothing is less personal then a cyber connection. It is just electronic pulses with no faces.
It's the same up down and sideways really. You fill out a form to request your DVD, (name, address, perhaps travel date, etc). That information is captured to perhaps personalize your packaging. The only difference is your package gets extensively handled by the post office. :)

DVD's are also digital content, so it's the same electronic pulses. The difference being when they're not busy pulsing, they sit on the shelf collecting dust. :) I also can't say that I've found a package or a DVD to have any temperature advantage, unless I've left them on or near the heater. :D

I think 'cyber' implies a relationship where it's not in either instance, it's simply delivery method. One via mail, one via wire.

I'm in my early 50's so I grew up on both sides of this debate; having owned piles of DVD's from their inception, CD's, casettes (VHS can go to H***. Rewinding is the devil), CD & DVD based games, etc. However, I never access my collection . They all sit in my entertainment center taking up space. However, I won't get rid of them despite their lack of use. It doesn't give me a larger sense, say, queuing up Pirates of the Caribbean from Disney+ vs. pulling out my DVD, firing up my PS3 and loading it up. It's the same movie, same quality, I just don't have to pull the disk out and put it away when I'm done. I don't feel any closer to the product having a hardcopy of it, so that element yes is fairly lost on me. But I do get the attachment to ownership.
 

spock8113

Well-Known Member
I have the Electric Light Parade on 8-track and have never had to "whip-snap" the tape back into the cartridge-(Google (verb) that).
Glass negatives, Brownies, 620 roll film, 35mm film, 8mm movie film, Polaroid film, slides, cartridge film, video cassette, Super VHS, DVD video cameras, HD1080 video and now 4k on the verge of 8K video cameras. All these media evolved over the years as does Disney, none if it by choice, but more out of necessity. Unfortunately we are all in the same carpool!
 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
My time in Vietnam I purchased a reel to reel tape deck, you could put 4 or 5 albums on a tape had like 40 tapes, had a turn table for vinyl records . Hurricane Hugo hit and flooded the house and destroyed everything tapes, records etc. Kept it all in boxes for years just couldn't part with it finally trashed it all. Still have a cassette player and a lot of cassettes. VHS Disney movie tapes from when my boys were little. Break out the VHS when the granddaughters are here
Yeah, I bought the whole thing myself. Turntable, speakers, amplifier. Reel to Reel tape player and I also bought a car tape player that took both cassette and 8 track in the same spot***. It was a mechanical miracle that broke within 6 months and couldn't be fixed. It was a head turner for awhile though. I used the other stuff for years, but eventually it all broke and was tossed.

*** The face looked normal. You put the cassette in just like any other. However, if you wanted to play an 8 track you just pushed it in the machine in the same areas as the cassette area and the cassette entrance and workings just folded upward out of the way and you played the 8 tracks. I have no Cassettes or 8 tracks anymore though.
 
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