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Strollers aren't the problem!

RaveOnEd

Active Member
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The Disney strollers are huge and hard.... easily worse than average.
They seem to be primarily designed to be ugly and too large to steal. If they could find a more compact model, that would help.
What's funny is, my daughter is 18, but still talks about how much she liked the Disney strollers when she was 5! I think part of it had to do with them putting "Princess" in front of her name on the paper they put in the plastic sheet on the back of it!
 

jaklgreen

Well-Known Member
The Disney strollers are huge and hard.... easily worse than average.
They seem to be primarily designed to be ugly and too large to steal. If they could find a more compact model, that would help.
They are definitely designed to be durable. When our kids where little, we rented them during one of our trips. Of course the price was much lower then. They ended up tripling the price of them in one shot. Cast members said that people where breaking the wheels because they were going over the weight limit and putting older kids, and even adults, in them. I imagine a slimmer size stroller that can still handle the weight and is durable would be hard to find.
 

aliceismad

Well-Known Member
They are definitely designed to be durable. When our kids where little, we rented them during one of our trips. Of course the price was much lower then. They ended up tripling the price of them in one shot. Cast members said that people where breaking the wheels because they were going over the weight limit and putting older kids, and even adults, in them. I imagine a slimmer size stroller that can still handle the weight and is durable would be hard to find.
Seriously. Jerks gonna jerk.

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(ETA: I don't really believe that. I think most people are decent. It's just become the running joke in our house.)
 
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Greg in TN

Member
So sorry someone was rude to you AT DISNEY. ... Me? I've been at my desk, AT WORK, all day ..... ;)

Just kidding. Yes, I know the strollers, scooters, walkway hijackers, line cutters, etc. are ALL very frustrating, annoying & aggravating. All of that just gets worse as the crowds get bigger. It seems that none of the ones who are causing those problems care that they're causing problems for anyone else. The actions appear to work for them, so, in their minds, they're justified -- and the rest of us can go ....... away ..
 

larryz

Can't 'Member Anything
Premium Member
Unfortunately, even if it were legal and you could implement such a thing, the kind of people who are problematic at Disney would probably balk, cry, whine, refuse to take it, threaten to sue, call you a liar, and badger the poor CMs.
Or would lie on every answer, and then behave like they normally do -- like self-important, inconsiderate jerks.
 

draybook

Well-Known Member
I used to get run into by strollers but on our last trip I got hit, bumped, crashed onto by more people whose eyes were glued to their screens. No one looks up anymore.

View attachment 370402

To piggyback off of this, it amazes me how many of my fellow stroller pushers stay glued to their phones while pushing their little ones around the parks. It also amazes me how many people don't think of walkways as roads for pedestrians. Ie, stay to the right so that others may pass and make sure to look before turning.
 
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Raineman

Well-Known Member
The problem as I see it isn't with the strollers themselves, ie the actual physical item, but with the people who use them and how they use them. As others have mentioned, the way people push them around and take out peoples ankles, the way people use them as mobile storage units, and the sheer numbers in the parks, mostly because (I know I'm going to catch flak for this, and it has been discussed ad nauseum on here, but here goes anyway) people are bringing young children to the parks when it would be a better idea to not bring them-if a child needs a stroller, they are too young for extended days at WDW parks (IMO, of course).
 

aliceismad

Well-Known Member
if a child needs a stroller, they are too young for extended days at WDW parks (IMO, of course).
I agree that some people use strollers poorly and should be more considerate. I agree that some people use them as mobile storage, which is a waste of park space. I completely disagree that a child who needs a stroller (or may need a stroller for part of a day) shouldn't be in the parks. As you said, that's been discussed ad nauseum, but many, many, many people who bring smaller children to the parks actually aren't doing extended days. Some of us are very cautious about not wearing out our child, and ourselves, and have half days planned (or at the very least long breaks for naps mid-day). Not that I'm going to change anyone's mind, but the number of great parents I know who are doing the best they can far outweighs the number of crappy parents. Most of us actually want to do what's best for our kids, even if that means missing fireworks or skipping rides or what have you. It's exhausting when the world now is so accepting of parent shaming.

I'm thankful we'll be doing this trip hopefully completely sans stroller (for my own reasons. Strollers are a PITA IMO and I'm happy to be rid of it. ), but I'm sympathetic to those who are doing their best, within Disney's guidelines, and within the bounds of common courtesy. At various theme parks, zoos, etc., I've witnessed just as many people cutting off a stroller as I have strollers coming close to hitting people. It's really a shame that anyone feels so entitled that they think they deserve the walkway, or the parks, more than anyone else.
 

Raineman

Well-Known Member
I agree that some people use strollers poorly and should be more considerate. I agree that some people use them as mobile storage, which is a waste of park space. I completely disagree that a child who needs a stroller (or may need a stroller for part of a day) shouldn't be in the parks. As you said, that's been discussed ad nauseum, but many, many, many people who bring smaller children to the parks actually aren't doing extended days. Some of us are very cautious about not wearing out our child, and ourselves, and have half days planned (or at the very least long breaks for naps mid-day). Not that I'm going to change anyone's mind, but the number of great parents I know who are doing the best they can far outweighs the number of crappy parents. Most of us actually want to do what's best for our kids, even if that means missing fireworks or skipping rides or what have you. It's exhausting when the world now is so accepting of parent shaming.

I'm thankful we'll be doing this trip hopefully completely sans stroller (for my own reasons. Strollers are a PITA IMO and I'm happy to be rid of it. ), but I'm sympathetic to those who are doing their best, within Disney's guidelines, and within the bounds of common courtesy. At various theme parks, zoos, etc., I've witnessed just as many people cutting off a stroller as I have strollers coming close to hitting people. It's really a shame that anyone feels so entitled that they think they deserve the walkway, or the parks, more than anyone else.
I need to explain that my opinion of bringing young children to the parks is not so much based on the effect that long park days will have on the child, it's more of how the effect on the child will affect the parents. If a young child gets, tired, cranky, overstimulated, etc, they get over it quickly, especially with a mid-day nap or swim back at the resort. However, the parents bear the brunt of this situation-pushing a stroller all day, changing diapers or clothes if needed, dealing with a cranky or overstimulated child, not being able to enjoy the parks as much as you would want from having to always worry about and watch your child, etc. This can turn a WDW vacation into a tiring, frustrating and emotionally exhausting time for the parents which hinders their ability to enjoy their time at WDW. Once kids get to the 8-10 year old age range, they can walk around without getting too tired, they are more emotionally mature and somewhat independent, which allows the entire family to relax and enjoy their vacation. If having to deal with young children who require the attention that I described above does not hurt a parents enjoyment of WDW, then by all means, bring your kids (this type of parent is definitely better at the parenting game than me, and I applaud them for it).
 

aliceismad

Well-Known Member
I need to explain that my opinion of bringing young children to the parks is not so much based on the effect that long park days will have on the child, it's more of how the effect on the child will affect the parents. If a young child gets, tired, cranky, overstimulated, etc, they get over it quickly, especially with a mid-day nap or swim back at the resort. However, the parents bear the brunt of this situation-pushing a stroller all day, changing diapers or clothes if needed, dealing with a cranky or overstimulated child, not being able to enjoy the parks as much as you would want from having to always worry about and watch your child, etc. This can turn a WDW vacation into a tiring, frustrating and emotionally exhausting time for the parents which hinders their ability to enjoy their time at WDW. Once kids get to the 8-10 year old age range, they can walk around without getting too tired, they are more emotionally mature and somewhat independent, which allows the entire family to relax and enjoy their vacation. If having to deal with young children who require the attention that I described above does not hurt a parents enjoyment of WDW, then by all means, bring your kids (this type of parent is definitely better at the parenting game than me, and I applaud them for it).
No worries. You're allowed to have your own opinion, but you could argue this for any vacation, really. My kid id just as likely to be cranky at the beach, at a zoo, etc., and not always getting to do what you want to do is just part of the compromise of parenting. Frankly, (as I've said before elsewhere) seeing WDW or DL through my child's eyes and experiencing it as if it's the first time again is worth all the money to visit and the most magical thing I've ever experienced at Disney. I've enjoyed Disney more because I brought a young child. Skipping FOP is little payment for the joy of watching your kid hug Donald or giggle on Dumbo.
 

Kingoglow

Well-Known Member
/snip
Some of us are very cautious about not wearing out our child, and ourselves, and have half days planned (or at the very least long breaks for naps mid-day).
/snip
No one thinks that they are part of the problem. Of course if this was true, then there wouldn't be such a big problem.

There are simply too many strollers in the parks. Fantasy Land was not designed for large stroller parking lots. A lot of the issue with navigating that area is trying to avoid that huge stroller park (which is about the same footprint as the carousel itself...). In turn, this backs up pedestrian traffic into the path between PPF and Small World - all the way back into the next stroller park near the Tangled Toilets. Not to mention the pedestrian bridge leading to BTM next to the lake - that's a whole other mess.

Every mom is going to react this way. 'It is not me! It must be everyone else.'
Of course it is, mom... it must be everyone else.
 

aliceismad

Well-Known Member
No one thinks that they are part of the problem. Of course if this was true, then there wouldn't be such a big problem.
Nah, I'm pretty sure the jerks know they're jerks and just do it anyway.

I'm fairly certain I'm not an expert in Disney or theme park layouts, so I can't say what's best for a park. I'm sure Magic Kingdom wasn't designed for the crowds it handles now, but that's what Disney has chosen to do with it.
 

Michaelson

Well-Known Member
Our standard practice with 4 adults and a 3 year old with stroller is to walk single file, and keep the stroller between US, rather than leading the pack. That way if there's a sudden stop for some reason, one of us 'takes the hit', and not a stranger.

It's easy to throw rocks at folks who use strollers when they, themselves, have not ever been in the park with a 3 year old. Young legs want to walk as much as they can, and don't WANT to be in the stroller, but when they get tired, they want to get in and ride, and we keep rolling on to the next destination.

Sure, in a 'snap shot' look at the park crowds, you see strollers rolling along and backpacks/packages in the stroller, but I assure you, after you've carried a 30+ pound child for a few minutes, rotating between adults before everyone gives out, the kid goes BACK in the stroller, and the packages and back packs come out. That much dead weight on a forced march doesn't work. We're not in the military!!!

We experienced NO melt downs the entire 2 weeks we were there due to the fact the stroller was available for the power nap when required (and an attached fan to keep things cool inside), which I'm positive we would have had without one.

Strollers are actually VERY useful in the park, be it rotating between kid movement or backpack transport when the young'n is on the hoof, and they're GREAT for parking in the designated parking areas to hold items you don't have to then carry onto a ride.

Ours also quickly breaks down and is slung over the shoulder with an already attached shoulder strap, so we can collapse the rolling conveyance and be on a tram in the blink of an eye.

They just need to be used and controlled in a safe manner. We didn't have a bit of trouble, and we've been to the park twice in the past couple years with a stroller and no one has been run over or delayed due to our standard operating procedures, and we kept things to ourselves.

It's people who don't use common sense or courtesy that give the rest of 'us' a black eye when we're using strollers in a safe and acceptable manner.

Regards! Michaelson
 
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thomas998

Well-Known Member
Just got back from a few days at WDW. The stroller rule is supposedly in effect, although I saw quite a few that seemed to be larger than the allowed size. Even still, I don't think I ever had a problem with a stroller being in my way. The biggest problem was people stopping in the middle of the flow of traffic. If you have to talk something over with your group, check your map, pick up another fast pass, answer a call, etc., MOVE TO THE SIDE!!!

Also, a much less annoyance was people trying to take advantage of lines. Cutting, sweet-talking the CM for a free fast pass while everyone waits behind you, sending one runner ahead of a group and having the rest try to catch up. "Excuse me, we need to catch up with our party." No, you're using your little kid as a way around the line. lol

Keep the strollers. Get rid of the rude people. Problem solved. :D:D:D
Well the problems you mention aren't problems that they can easily address. The reason they picked stroller size as something to crack down on is that it is easy to filter out the mega-monster strollers at the front gate when guests enter... Are people standing or stopping in the middle of a sidewalk a problem? Yes, but you can't change that unless you start spreading out CM's every 10 yards along a path that continually say hurry up move along... and even if you could magically find CM's that worked for free it wouldn't solve the problem because those very same CM's would be standing there causing the same problem.

As for line cutters, yes a big problem and one that Disney could deal with but they have refused to do anything about. In a perfect world Disney's security would be monitoring queues for line cutters and when they found someone doing it they would immediantly escort them from the park and ban them for a year. It be harsh but if it happened a few times word would get out and the problem would instantly cure itself... All you can do for this as a guest is simply refuse to move and allow the people past. It is what I do and have often had other visitor clamoring to defend the line cutter as baffling as that might be, but you can hold your ground on that one. Just be ready for your own family to get upset and claim you are embarrassing them for refusing to let someone just cut in line.
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
I've never had a issue regarding strollers. I've had several issues regarding morbidly obese people and their scooters though...
Scooter are a problem, but most of the times they run into you it isn't the obese riders because most of them have been living on their scooter for years and knows how to drive it... it tends to be the people that are just too lazy to walk and decided to rent them for Disney yet have no clue how to drive one.
 
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