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Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance

MisterPenguin

🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧Fully Pfizered!🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧
Premium Member
You're a clueless parent if you're not well aware of what will scare your kid.
I'm a father of twin boys who are 17 now.
I knew very well what would scare them to what degree when they were younger.
I knew how they would react if they did get scared, and I knew how to handle them if they did.

Judging by your avatar, you seem like you're in great shape being the father of 17 year olds.
 

trainplane3

Well-Known Member
I`m being far too nice to you this week. Before next week, something else I promised. Nothing to give too much away for those who like stealing and hoarding stuff in their garage, but enough to show the Rise queue layout. Red is Fastpass, Blue standby and orange common passage:

View attachment 431613
My garage is called "E:\Pictures\Disney\Other Disney stuff\Martin\2019" 🤣 It is fun going back and looking over your drawings every so often though.

On topic on this ride. After watching tons of videos on RotR I truly expect this to finally blow my mind (with a combination of story telling, tech, and ride length?) like the original Imagination...back in 1997...when the ride was at the end of its life. Nothing else has really beat it out. Maybe ToT? Kinda says something when a ride from 1982 may finally be matched in 2019.
 

Steph15251

Well-Known Member
Spideys queue puts you inside a classic comic book. It does what it should, and gives you no clue just how Amazing the ride is going to be. I remember my first ride, and I thought the ride would be the cheap animation style shown in the preshow. As soon as Spidey jumped on my car, My jaw was hanging for 4 minutes.

Maybe this ride will do that, but it really seems to me to be a well executed Star Wars dark ride with a few neat small effects that add to the immersion. The only “new” part is that the elevator you get on
Has some sudden movement, unlike Transformers’. Everything else on it is far from mind blowing.

The Disnoids are all crying. I mean, Disney hasn’t even attempted to do something like this for decades in the US. It seems to be a ride truly deserving the E ticket moniker. But unless the POVs show something I’m not aware of, I think the “groundbreaking” talk is a bit much.
While I have not been on RotR yet I find it really unfair to can Disney fans disnoids also people can love what they love without being called names
 

egg

Well-Known Member
OR parents don't drag their kids on things the kids don't want to do. If your kid is going to be scared by a cold and stern FO officer, DON"T TAKE THEM ON THE RIDE! I have seen some great parents in my time working arractions, but I've also see A LOT of garbage selfish one ones.

I’m thankful my dad and grandpa dragged me on thunder mountain back in the day despite me crying in line. And I applaud these parents for taking her on the ride. If my parents never forced me to go on rides that I didn’t want to go on, I would be a different person. In a bad way.
 

yensidtlaw1969

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
Well, not that new. It’s been done before.

Like I said a few weeks ago, Rise has very little new. It succeeds by being greater than the sum of its parts.

It does help too that its parts are not entirely inconsiderable. It's got to be the attraction that most combines grand scale and thorough design that Disney's built in the swamps since the dawn of the new millennium.

My hope is that it encourages guests to bolt upright and say "if you can do THAT, why have you been withholding it and when's the next thing like it opening up?"
 

PB Watermelon

Well-Known Member
I could hide behind the adage that I don't write the headlines for the web (which is true), however I do for my newscast. In both cases, web and broadcast, there is a degree of salesmanship involved. If people aren't attracted to what you are writing/saying it doesn't matter how wonderful, detailed and epic the prose is that follows. That said, headlines must be accurate. While I like what you attempting in your example, it is too long. When whoever finalized the headline came up with "Disney’s new ‘Star Wars’ attraction evacuated on opening day, riders say" that was probably the most accurate thing we could have said at that time. We apparently added the sub headline "Disney World ride reportedly reopens about hour after being evacuated" as soon as that info came in.

God knows Disney and the other parks are usually.... let's call it "measured"... when talking on the record about any problems, if they comment at all, but their top people are quite quick to email or call us up if they are unhappy with something we've said or written. While it is extremely rare for us to make changes just because they are unhappy, sometimes we will try to find a compromise. Usually that means adding their response. None of us are perfect.

Something I've been ruminating on all day...it struck me as odd when you say your organization "strives" to be fair and even-handed. Isn't that rather like saying a pilot strives to land a plane? Or a mother strives to care for her child? No, that's what you're supposed to do. It should be automatic, like respiration in your sleep. You shouldn't even have to think about it, you just do it. If you have to work at being fair and direct as a journalist....something's wrong. Now you're talking about salesmanship. Yeah. Something's wrong. Not with you, but with journalism.
 

yensidtlaw1969

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
Something I've been ruminating on all day...it struck me as odd when you say your organization "strives" to be fair and even-handed. Isn't that rather like saying a pilot strives to land a plane? Or a mother strives to care for her child? No, that's what you're supposed to do. It should be automatic, like respiration in your sleep. You shouldn't even have to think about it, you just do it. If you have to work at being fair and direct as a journalist....something's wrong. Now you're talking about salesmanship. Yeah. Something's wrong. Not with you, but with journalism.
The work that comes in "striving" to be fair and balanced in journalism is less about navigating a personal moral fault and more about having to navigate your way to an accurate depiction of facts despite working from disparate sources that don't always paint the same picture.

I don't think kpilcher was confessing to having a hard time writing a fair article because of the temptation to write something more inflammatory. It seemed much more about the inherent difficulties in writing a clinical report based on information gathered by non-clinical beings about fluctuating situations.

And, in all fairness, sometimes conditions arise where a pilot will have to strive to land a plane. Even professionals. The world can be messy.
 
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yensidtlaw1969

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
Forgive me if this question has already been asked - I've kept my eye out for it for a while and search isn't doing me any favors.

Does anyone have a ballpark figure they can share for the cost of Rise of the Resistance?
 

kpilcher

Well-Known Member
Something I've been ruminating on all day...it struck me as odd when you say your organization "strives" to be fair and even-handed. Isn't that rather like saying a pilot strives to land a plane? Or a mother strives to care for her child? No, that's what you're supposed to do. It should be automatic, like respiration in your sleep. You shouldn't even have to think about it, you just do it. If you have to work at being fair and direct as a journalist....something's wrong. Now you're talking about salesmanship. Yeah. Something's wrong. Not with you, but with journalism.
I used the word "strives" because none of us are perfect. Not pilots, mothers or journalists.
The type of salesmanship I'm talking about has been part of journalism since the days of Ben Franklin or the kid in Spaceship Earth yelling "Civil War Over."
 

kpilcher

Well-Known Member
The work that comes in "striving" to be fair and balanced in journalism is less about navigating a personal moral fault and more about having to navigate your way to an accurate depiction of facts despite working from disparate sources that don't always paint the same picture.

I don't think kpilcher was confessing to having a hard time writing a fair article because of the temptation to write something more inflammatory. It seemed much more about the inherent difficulties in writing a clinical report based on information gathered by non-clinical beings about fluctuating situations.

And, in all fairness, sometimes conditions arise where a pilot will have to strive to land a plane. Even professionals. The world can be messy.
Very well put.
 

CM.X777

Active Member
ROTR was allegedly designed to be reskinned to the original trilogy. If Rise of Skywalker is a stinker you might want to head to Disney Studios Paris in 2025, where I wouldn't be surprised if this ride becomes Rise of the Rebellion. I'm no insider, but I can dream.

It was not designed to be reskinned.

I’m thankful my dad and grandpa dragged me on thunder mountain back in the day despite me crying in line. And I applaud these parents for taking her on the ride. If my parents never forced me to go on rides that I didn’t want to go on, I would be a different person. In a bad way.

And I have seen many kids react the way you describe where, they are fine/happy once the ride is over or starts. I'm talking about the selfish garbage parents that literally drag their crying screaming kids into a ride vehicle. If your kid is acting like a cat not wanting to into water clinging to anything they can grab to not be put on the ride, you need to accept you're not going on the ride. Like I said there are some great parents that come to Disneyland but A LOT of sh@# ones too.
 

britain

Well-Known Member
Yes, not on this level that I'm aware of.
This really is like being in the ship.

It helps when a show building with rooms and doors and elevators is trying to simulate a building with rooms and doors and elevators. It isn’t trying to be a city block at night, a subterranean network of caves, or a coastal village.

ROTR’s trackless vehicles also have the blessing of approximating a movie-correct mode of transportation (the zamboni-style troop transports in A New Hope). It’s not like Geppetto had some handcarved four-person wagons sitting around his shop the film of Pinocchio. No haunted house stories have smooth, black, pod-like carriages in them.

Even when themed environments are given their best treatment possible, some stories will fit the medium better than others.
 
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Disstevefan1

Well-Known Member
I wouldn’t be shocked if the madness continued through New Years at this point. As time goes on the opening day rush will wear off. People won’t be gaming the system to ride 4 and 5 times in a day and it will probably look something like FoP which still gets long waits but no crazy 4am arrivals.

How is it possible to game the system to ride 4 and 5 times in a day?
 

ChewbaccaYourMum

Well-Known Member
Somehow my brother had 2 digital fast passes left from the breakdowns and evac while I had none left so we were able to have them let us use both to go together. So, ride #4. 5 counting the evac.

As an aside I think this system they’re using is broken. We shouldn’t be able to ride like this but oh well.
EVERY MAN/WOMAN FOR HIM/HERSELF! 4 rides!
 
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