News Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance to begin Standby September 23rd

RollerCoaster

Well-Known Member
I’ll be curious to see the LL composition here. If they set aside 2/3 of capacity for that with hour-long windows, they risk very long LL queues, especially with breakdowns, which are frequent. We used to see this on Test Track with FP+. I guess that was fine when it was free. But, people will demand refunds now. So I am struggling to imagine them selling that many LL reservations, but we will see. It is far safer to set it at 25% or so, which generally ensures a short LL line and if there is a momentary glut, which will happen, they can quickly get those LL guests on the ride.
I expect no more than 20% of the theoretical capacity and possibly even less will be reserved for LL. You have to account for downtime and in the case of a LL upcharge, the expectation from the guest is that they get to ride that attraction. A replacement LL if there is downtime is not going to be an acceptable substitute.
 

Disstevefan1

Well-Known Member
I expect no more than 20% of the theoretical capacity and possibly even less will be reserved for LL. You have to account for downtime and in the case of a LL upcharge, the expectation from the guest is that they get to ride that attraction. A replacement LL if there is downtime is not going to be an acceptable substitute.
I would think they would sell as many LLs as there are people who will pay for it?

It is all about the MONEY after all…
 

RollerCoaster

Well-Known Member
With the P2P option coming soon for Rise, Disney will have to walk a fine line between LL capacity and wait times. And the virtual queue (which still sounds utterly stupid to me, it’s not a virtual queue, it’s a “standby line” 🙄) will be cut off once it hits a certain length for two reasons. One is so the lines don’t snake out around the entire park - any standby for this more than 3 hours is bound to cause problems, especially when it breaks down.
Disney has never cut off standby lines when they hit a certain length.

Indiana Jones at Disneyland operated on a routine basis for several years after opening with a line that snaked outside the regular queue, through Adventureland, out to the Hub, and sometimes partially down Main Street. Cast members staffed the queue at crossing points, like parades, for crowd control.

When the ride would go down you basically were left with two options- leave the queue or wait it out in line. That's how most parks handle this and it meets guest expectations. Most parks have a cut-off point where they don't give you an exit return pass. Often you have to be on the ride during the breakdown. Some parks will accommodate if you're past a certain point like having been grouped to board or if you've been through a pre-show.
 

diggity16

Member
Getting a boarding group could be stressful, but so is the thought of trying to make a panic decision early in the morning seeing …
1. Is IAS open still for Rise to us (staying office most of the time)?
2. How much is it going to cost? I’ve seen several places that it will vary by date and time, so is this going to be a surprise?
3. What time and how does it fit into everything else already planned. I know there was no control of this with BGs but they were flexible always. Will that be the case here?

we’ve thankfully ridden it several times, but going with family soon and they will want to experience it. We’ll jump in line for sure, but not for hours.
 

CJR

Well-Known Member
Getting a boarding group could be stressful, but so is the thought of trying to make a panic decision early in the morning seeing …
1. Is IAS open still for Rise to us (staying office most of the time)?
2. How much is it going to cost? I’ve seen several places that it will vary by date and time, so is this going to be a surprise?
3. What time and how does it fit into everything else already planned. I know there was no control of this with BGs but they were flexible always. Will that be the case here?

we’ve thankfully ridden it several times, but going with family soon and they will want to experience it. We’ll jump in line for sure, but not for hours.

I think the worst part about the boarding groups was that there was no guarantee that you would ever get called. It was a lot of work just to get a group, but then, there was the feeling of worry following that, since if the ride went down or something, you were tough out of luck - especially if you had a higher number. If you never got called, all that work and stress of getting up early while on vacation was worthless.

At least with a regular standby line available there will be a better feeling of certainty. They will still empty the line out of there is a major breakdown, or at least they do for other attractions currently, but typically, as long as you're officially in the standby line, you'll get on the ride.

It really depends just how long you're willing to wait. I suspect that it will be multiple hours for a very long time, as people will very likely fork over the cash for IAS the longer the stand by line is - further adding to the standby wait time. If I went into DHS planning to ride RotR via standby, I would have my Nintendo Switch with me.

I don't trust Disney will limit IAS much after they get the system figured out. You can see from things like the Candlelight Processional, Disney will fill it up with guests willing to pay extra if they get confident. They'll start out small, I think, but over time, they'll gradually raise that cap.
 

networkpro

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
Yes
Getting a boarding group could be stressful, but so is the thought of trying to make a panic decision early in the morning seeing …
1. Is IAS open still for Rise to us (staying office most of the time)?
2. How much is it going to cost? I’ve seen several places that it will vary by date and time, so is this going to be a surprise?
3. What time and how does it fit into everything else already planned. I know there was no control of this with BGs but they were flexible always. Will that be the case here?

we’ve thankfully ridden it several times, but going with family soon and they will want to experience it. We’ll jump in line for sure, but not for hours.

1. I take it that autocorrect changed your staying offsite to office. IAS will be open to everyone.
2. The variable rate will be higher for days when the crowds are large, and lower for lower crowd days. It hasnt started yet so no one knows what the inital price might be other than not free.
3. Here's the tricky part of IAS: According to the literature, when you look to purchase an IAS, you'll be presented with several different times to choose from. Might be soon might be quite a bit later, no one knows how they'll schedule the merging of IAS and standby to fill the available capacity. I imagine the earlier you purchase in a day, the earlier your ride time might be. No idea if there will be a cap on the number of IAS riders per hour either.
 

diggity16

Member
1. I take it that autocorrect changed your staying offsite to office. IAS will be open to everyone.
2. The variable rate will be higher for days when the crowds are large, and lower for lower crowd days. It hasnt started yet so no one knows what the inital price might be other than not free.
3. Here's the tricky part of IAS: According to the literature, when you look to purchase an IAS, you'll be presented with several different times to choose from. Might be soon might be quite a bit later, no one knows how they'll schedule the merging of IAS and standby to fill the available capacity. I imagine the earlier you purchase in a day, the earlier your ride time might be. No idea if there will be a cap on the number of IAS riders per hour either.
Whoops yes, thanks for the catch. Going too quick on mobile. Sure it’ll but open to all, but I anticipate this to be one of the most wanted IAS. Depending on how many will be available, will it sell out? I won’t be able to look for one until we get into the park (I think that’s how it works). Will be interesting to see how it plays out for sure.
 

matt9112

Well-Known Member
I hope this is incredibly temporary. I'd much rather take my chances spending a minute or two getting a boarding group vs. waiting in FoP-style 300min lines come October.


Not sure if it will ne that bad. Sure it will be novel to be able to wait in line but people have had years to ride it. Look at FOP now i think thats more accurate outside of first couple days.
 

Touchdown

Well-Known Member
For what it’s worth, DL’s full queue with some overflow was only a 40 min wait to the briefing room. While I think WDW’s queue is longer, I think it’s a max 1 hour queue with no LL. The line will likely extend out into Grand Ave for sometime.
 

MrPromey

Well-Known Member
Despite what some online bloggers claim the majority of the attraction capacity was never reserved for FP. In real-world operations sometimes the FP line would eat up more capacity in an hour than stand-by, but that would never be the plan.

Those who claim that 60-80 percent of capacity was allocated for FP distribution are wrong. If Disney actually distributed FP's for more than 50% of a ride's capacity then they would be creating operational problems they'd prefer to avoid. When you determine how many FPs can be distributed you have to account for unanticipated scenarios- downtime, periods of time when throughput unexpectedly falls, and each ride has to pick up the slack for other rides' downtime. You have to account for FPs that are distributed at guest relations or those that are given as a replacement when an attraction is down.

What happened with the extra build-out of TSMM would seem to contradict this, wouldn't it?

Also, I always assumed those issues are why the guest relations passes always had excusions for the most in-demand options.
 

peter11435

Well-Known Member
Despite what some online bloggers claim the majority of the attraction capacity was never reserved for FP. In real-world operations sometimes the FP line would eat up more capacity in an hour than stand-by, but that would never be the plan.

Those who claim that 60-80 percent of capacity was allocated for FP distribution are wrong. If Disney actually distributed FP's for more than 50% of a ride's capacity then they would be creating operational problems they'd prefer to avoid. When you determine how many FPs can be distributed you have to account for unanticipated scenarios- downtime, periods of time when throughput unexpectedly falls, and each ride has to pick up the slack for other rides' downtime. You have to account for FPs that are distributed at guest relations or those that are given as a replacement when an attraction is down.
I assure you that you are wrong. Disney did indeed give out more than 50% of an attractions capacity in Fastpass inventory. Usually significantly more than 50%. Generally the number was in the 60-70% range. Once accounting for fastpasses given out elsewhere and other scenarios, roughly 80% of an attractions riders were utilizing the Fastpass queue.
 

PolynesianPrincess

Well-Known Member
As many others have said, this seems like a blatant attempt at cashing in with Lightning Lane. The choice for the average guest (one who is not at rope drop) will now be wait 3 hours or pay to get on right away. In that scenario, I can see many people opting to pay whatever ridiculous price is charged.

I also wouldn’t be surprised to see them artificially inflate wait times to incentivize people to buy Lighting Lane or Genie+. In fact I think it’s fair to be worried that they’re going to do that across the board at many rides. Will be interested to see how posted vs. actual wait times are once this all launches.

If they inflate wait times, people can always check an app like Lines to see exactly what people are waiting versus the posted wait time.
 

PolynesianPrincess

Well-Known Member
Okay, I’m concerned because I generally like going to WDW. But, if I follow this to its conclusion, I could see one day not wanting to go anymore. That’s disappointing. But, if this is how enough people want to behave, then maybe the parks just won’t be for me in the future.

Nothing can be done about that, though.

We have APs so we go 2-3 times a year now. We would much rather go on a cruise but DCL is expensive. However, with the increases in resort prices and food prices and soon having to pay for transportation to/from the airport and the introduction of the costly LL, when you factor in all the extras for both a cruise and WDW, WDW is quickly climbing up to be almost as expensive as a Disney cruise. In my book, that's ok since we would rather cruise anyway! Seems like the parks may not be for us for much longer!
 

Disstevefan1

Well-Known Member
If they inflate wait times, people can always check an app like Lines to see exactly what people are waiting versus the posted wait time.
The G+, LL and pay per ride will force guests to play right into Disney’s hands.

The Genie app will direct folks to the less crowded attractions, making them crowded, so folks will use the G+ or pay per ride to get on that ride.

The Genie system puts Disney in total control while being promoted as a system designed to help guests. Disney could intentionally slow the throughput of an attraction to force guests to use G+ or pay per ride.

The G+ and pay per ride, now incentivizes Disney to make the parks crowded, the more crowded the parks are, the more money from G+ and pay per ride they can make!
 

PolynesianPrincess

Well-Known Member
The G+, LL and pay per ride will force guests to play right into Disney’s hands.

The Genie app will direct folks to the less crowded attractions, making them crowded, so folks will use the G+ or pay per ride to get on that ride.

The Genie system puts Disney in total control while being promoted as a system designed to help guests. Disney could intentionally slow the throughput of an attraction to force guests to use G+ or pay per ride.

The G+ and pay per ride, now incentivizes Disney to make the parks crowded, the more crowded the parks are, the more money from G+ and pay per ride they can make!

Right, I get that. I was just saying if people want to see what the REAL wait times are and not the potentially inflated wait times displayed at each attraction, they have that ability.

What I've seen a lot of is people thinking YOU WILL get to ride every single ride by skipping the line when you purchase G+. But even if you buy G+ there is no guarantee that you'll get on all the rides. Some rides could "sell out" before you have a chance to book it (like FP did when rides ran out of tickets) People seem to think G+ guarantees a ride on everything but that's just not true.
 

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