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Star Wars Hotel General Discussion

MickeyMinnieMom

Well-Known Member
Jack does a good job summarizing, but, you realize it's mostly info he's gotten from here and BlogMickey, right?
And elsewhere (this isn't the only board that discussed at length ages ago). ;)

But it's still useful to have a nice summary for anyone new to the topic, rather than having to comb through pages and pages -- or be lectured about required reading (though that'll probably happen anyway here -- even to people who have read it all!). That video would be useful in a first post.
 

larryz

Can't 'Member Anything
Premium Member
Except there’s a road between the park and the resort. Not such a great expansion pad if you need to re-route a road to use it.
Well, it's not like Disney has never crossed over/under a road, railroad, or canal with a ride before...
 

Unplugged

Well-Known Member
Sorry all, skipped a few pages here and there as it's a lot to read for what seems simple enough. So sorry if this is a repeat of arm-chair-imagineering. As others have stated, this is a short route, most likely direct with an overpass over incoming traffic to ensure no road issues and allow perfect speed control. Using screens as Uni did with Hogwarts Express, you have visibility covered (also refer to Mission:Space). So if the "transport to the outpost" is built on a bus platform with a hydraulics system similar to the Dinosaur/Indy ride vehicles, using the synchronized video, and controlled pathway, this is both a no-brainer and super easy for them to accomplish.

Hmm. After reasoning that out, I now want to ride that transport!
 

kthomas105

Well-Known Member
Sorry all, skipped a few pages here and there as it's a lot to read for what seems simple enough. So sorry if this is a repeat of arm-chair-imagineering. As others have stated, this is a short route, most likely direct with an overpass over incoming traffic to ensure no road issues and allow perfect speed control. Using screens as Uni did with Hogwarts Express, you have visibility covered (also refer to Mission:Space). So if the "transport to the outpost" is built on a bus platform with a hydraulics system similar to the Dinosaur/Indy ride vehicles, using the synchronized video, and controlled pathway, this is both a no-brainer and super easy for them to accomplish.

Hmm. After reasoning that out, I now want to ride that transport!
It will be a super effective and immersive as a form of transport definitely on par with HWE. Don’t expect an overpass with this one though, the roads the bus will cross will not have a steady stream of traffic and the bus can have “right of way” with simple traffic lights.
 

kthomas105

Well-Known Member
same construction technique they use to build the data centers around here... they put up nearly 50+ft walls like that in rapid succession
This is known as tilt-up construction. The walls are made of precast concrete trucked to the site and "tilted up" into place by a crane. This form of construction is often times used in commercial office buildings or industrial warehouses but is becoming more and more popular in various settings. Universal is using this method to construct its 2 new value hotels on the old site of Wet N' Wild (International drive)
 

Mac Tonight

Well-Known Member
Jack does a good job summarizing, but, you realize it's mostly info he's gotten from here and BlogMickey, right?
Summaries are fine, but what irks me is that he gets all his info from here and other sources, yet gets paid for it (through ad revenue) and still has the gall to ask for Patreon donations. Like, dude, I'm not gonna fund your livelihood to live in your mom's basement and regurgitate borrowed information I already know.
 

drod1985

Well-Known Member
Summaries are fine, but what irks me is that he gets all his info from here and other sources, yet gets paid for it (through ad revenue) and still has the gall to ask for Patreon donations. Like, dude, I'm not gonna fund your livelihood to live in your mom's basement and regurgitate borrowed information I already know.
But you're not his target audience.

His patrons are paying him to browse these sites all day so that they don't have to. For a lot of people it's a lot easier to watch a well produced 5-10 minute video summary than it is to browse these forums on a regular basis.
 

Mac Tonight

Well-Known Member
But you're not his target audience.

His patrons are paying him to browse these sites all day so that they don't have to. For a lot of people it's a lot easier to watch a well produced 5-10 minute video summary than it is to browse these forums on a regular basis.
That's just laziness and a waste of money. I already pay for the internet, I don't need to also pay someone else to search it for me.

But hey, that's just me.
 

Lensman

Premium Member
That's just laziness and a waste of money. I already pay for the internet, I don't need to also pay someone else to search it for me.

But hey, that's just me.
Also, one is paying to not put up with off-topic dissing of the business model of curated content when all you're after is updates on Disney's progress in constructing the Star Wars hotel.

I'm willing to put up with it.

But hey, that's just me.
 

Mac Tonight

Well-Known Member
Also, one is paying to not put up with off-topic dissing of the business model of curated content when all you're after is updates on Disney's progress in constructing the Star Wars hotel.

I'm willing to put up with it.

But hey, that's just me.
You don't have to pay for that. This board has an "ignore" feature. :)
Save you time AND money!
 

Missing20K

Well-Known Member
same construction technique they use to build the data centers around here... they put up nearly 50+ft walls like that in rapid succession
This is known as tilt-up construction. The walls are made of precast concrete trucked to the site and "tilted up" into place by a crane. This form of construction is often times used in commercial office buildings or industrial warehouses but is becoming more and more popular in various settings. Universal is using this method to construct its 2 new value hotels on the old site of Wet N' Wild (International drive)
Those are enormous panel sizes. Once you get above 12 feet wide you need permitting and an escort to ship them ("Wide Load" trucking) and once you go over 40 feet tall you generally need to pretension the panels to handle the stresses and avoid cracking. Anything over 50 feet becomes nearly impossible to truck as well.

Just had a client come back with a change order to use precast panels in place of brick/CMU cavity wall construction on a power plant because although the panels are more expensive, the time saved makes up for it. They are also uglier and prone to both production and installation issues but that's neither here nor there.
 
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