• Welcome to the WDWMAGIC.COM Forums!
    Please take a look around, and feel free to sign up and join the community.You can use your Twitter or Facebook account to sign up, or register directly.

News Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge - Construction/Specifics

Disney Irish Bruh

Well-Known Member
My Bothans tell me the freshly blacktopped area within your red boundary has been surrounded by cargo containers stacked two high to be used for extended queue for Smuggler's Run. There was also promotional filming throughout SW:GE while ride testing was going on. They have also seen GE CMs walking around carrying their new costumes, but they're not expected to start wearing them until the Cast Previews next week. So far they have been wearing costumes from other areas--ride operators are wearing the crowd control costume from Fantasmic! and food and stores are wearing black pants and either gold or red shirts. These are likely the spare costumes they had the most of in stock.

I can't wait to see it next week. What nobody has heard yet is whether we will get to walk around the entire land all the way down to the Critter Country entrance or if we will be limited to the Eastern half.
We saw that in the recent permits filed:

Disneyland - SW - DL Frontierland Expansion - BLD 10060/Attraction #2 - Tenant Improvement: 2,450 sq ft shade structure to be supported by single and double stacked shipping containers.
 

THE 1HAPPY HAUNT

Well-Known Member
Smuggler’s Run easily has the best queue in Disneyland. It’s not as long as you would expect, but there’s a ton of things going on. Highlights are the engine repair room, the view of the Millenium Falcon from the second level, the preshow, and the Millenium Falcon interior.

The preshow doesn’t get old. The Hondo AA is incredible—they really nailed his posture. Besides that, the big screen behind him, the two to his sides, and the moving droid next to him are nice diversions.

I’ve gone on Smuggler’s Run half a dozen times now, and I enjoy it more now than the first time. It’s an incredibly well done experience when you consider the entire package, from the facade to the ride itself.
now do you think you feel that way because 1.) it is new and most people consider new things superior at first 2.) you have early access before the general public so that gives you a feeling of inclusiveness and superiority 3.)you are not in the queue with the general public so you are experiencing a shorter version of it than say going on opening day and having to wait 3 hours in line? I ask because to me Indiana Jones has the best queue in Disneyland. even after all these years you can be in that thing for hours and still find new stuff, it sets the mood peferfectly, you really feel like you are in a temple. is it in your eyes better than Indy? and if so I gotta go back is it because of the 3 questions I asked you? I am curious if after 5 years or maybe 10 if you would still feel this way? only time will tell. glad you enjoyed the ride though. also the seats in the chest room remind me of the hard non cushion seats in mickey's house in toon town. is there any comfort to the seats as you wait to enter the **** pit??
 
Last edited:

Old Mouseketeer

Well-Known Member
That's what interests me the most; how long the CM's will keep this play-acting stuff up. I'm betting 30 days, with another burst of energy forced by management around D23 Expo. This isn't a short scripted spiel like Haunted Mansion's "drag your bodies away from the walls", this is RenFaire type acting and immersion that lasts for hours and hours until your shift ends.

Anyone who thinks 19 year old CM's working a snack bar are going to do that 8 hours a day are woefully ignorant of how theme parks work and operate. I'm looking at you, WDI executives who have never worked with the general public.



Bingo. On the flip side to the CM play acting shtick, there's the fact that most visitors are just going to want to go on the "Millenium Falcon Ride" and want to know where the entrance is after they take a picture of the Falcon sitting there surrounded by strollers and ECV's and large Raider Nation fans (that certainly don't look like the folks we have back home in Boise).

Let's not forget, New Orleans Square is the epitome of Imagineering excellence, from architecture to massive E Ticket attractions to dining and shopping and tiny details at every turn. It's the perfect recreation of a gracious and romantic bygone environment burned into the memory banks of all Americans and many foreigners.

But on any average busy afternoon, all you see of New Orleans Square is this...



Star Wars Land after the reservation weeks end in June won't be much different. And it won't look anything like the pre-opening publicity shots.



Agreed. Lost In Space is now owned by Disney, as a property developed by Fox in 1965. I got a Lost In Space vibe from their original remote control Star Wars robots they were testing too. WDI now has ownership of this Intellectual Property.

Don't mean to quibble, but WDI doesn't have ownership of Lost in Space any more than they have ownership of Star Wars. Disney is the owner of both Lucasfilm and 21st Century Fox and those brands own their intellectual properties. Disney has demonstrated that they allow the individual studios to "own" their brands and control usage in the parks. This began with Disney Feature Animation having influence or control over how animated characters were used at Disneyland.

WDI still has to negotiate usage of these brands and abide by creative restrictions of the various studios in the Disney family.
 

THE 1HAPPY HAUNT

Well-Known Member
That's what interests me the most; how long the CM's will keep this play-acting stuff up. I'm betting 30 days, with another burst of energy forced by management around D23 Expo. This isn't a short scripted spiel like Haunted Mansion's "drag your bodies away from the walls", this is RenFaire type acting and immersion that lasts for hours and hours until your shift ends.

Anyone who thinks 19 year old CM's working a snack bar are going to do that 8 hours a day are woefully ignorant of how theme parks work and operate. I'm looking at you, WDI executives who have never worked with the general public.



Bingo. On the flip side to the CM play acting shtick, there's the fact that most visitors are just going to want to go on the "Millenium Falcon Ride" and want to know where the entrance is after they take a picture of the Falcon sitting there surrounded by strollers and ECV's and large Raider Nation fans (that certainly don't look like the folks we have back home in Boise).

Let's not forget, New Orleans Square is the epitome of Imagineering excellence, from architecture to massive E Ticket attractions to dining and shopping and tiny details at every turn. It's the perfect recreation of a gracious and romantic bygone environment burned into the memory banks of all Americans and many foreigners.

But on any average busy afternoon, all you see of New Orleans Square is this...



Star Wars Land after the reservation weeks end in June won't be much different. And it won't look anything like the pre-opening publicity shots.



Agreed. Lost In Space is now owned by Disney, as a property developed by Fox in 1965. I got a Lost In Space vibe from their original remote control Star Wars robots they were testing too. WDI now has ownership of this Intellectual Property.

omg those strollers? that is...why??? just why sooo many????
 

SirWillow

Well-Known Member
But you're in a bar, the only one in the park, you are literally there to buy drinks. No one goes to Starbucks and buy 4 coffees, at least normal people ;). But in a bar, you can get people buying all night if the atmosphere is right for it. And Disney knows that, because they are only expanding bar areas in other areas of the resort like the hotels and DTD. But then the one place you provide drinks at DL, you turn it into a hole the wall. I don't understand the thinking personally.
I don't think you realized that you actually answered your own question.

As you say, many will hang around a bar for long periods of time, nursing several drinks and taking up a spot that prevents others from using the same spot. That's something that Disney does NOT want. They want people to come in, sample, then get out and make room for someone else to come in. Not occupy a place for a long period of time. So what's one way they can try to ensure that people are moving in and out at a steady rate? Make it a smaller place with a lower occupancy that encourages people to move along instead of staying around and lingering.
 

fctiger

Well-Known Member
I don't think you realized that you actually answered your own question.

As you say, many will hang around a bar for long periods of time, nursing several drinks and taking up a spot that prevents others from using the same spot. That's something that Disney does NOT want. They want people to come in, sample, then get out and make room for someone else to come in. Not occupy a place for a long period of time. So what's one way they can try to ensure that people are moving in and out at a steady rate? Make it a smaller place with a lower occupancy that encourages people to move along instead of staying around and lingering.
I guess to me that still doesn't make a lot of sense. People will be doing that anyway. And since its smaller, it just means more people will be standing around just waiting for a table. Ever been to Trader Sam's on a Saturday night? No one there ever seem encouraged to move on quickly even with a line of people out the door, but I digress. And I don't really understand if you don't want people lounging around then why bother making it a bar in the first place? But OK, none of it is a huge deal, they have their reasons and what you're saying make sense I guess. I just don't see the point if you are building a land that is designed to keep people lingering but then expect them to move through it fast.
 

nesboy43

Well-Known Member
The problem with this land that people have to realize is that Disney needs to build it for the long term, not just the crazy crowding of the first few years. In 10 years will the cantina need to have 200 people in there at a time? Probably not. Will the rides remain popular? Most likely. The shops, restaurants, and other "small details" of the land will be one and done experiences after the initial hype and excitement dies down.

Go to Forbidden Journey in Universal Studios Hollywood and you can see how you have to walk for miles in a giant queue that is empty and it seems like a waste. Building for only the initial demand is not the way to go.
 

Darkbeer1

Well-Known Member
But go to 3 Broomsticks, and the place is packed on Slow Days, same with Moe's Tavern.

Notice that DCA didn't close the Cove Bar during the Pixar Pier Conversion.

Bars are different than rides. They are designed to sit down, relax and spend time talking to others.

So yes, in 10 years, 200 seats will still probably not be enough seats for the Cantina.
 

BasiltheBatLord

Well-Known Member
The shops, restaurants, and other "small details" of the land will be one and done experiences after the initial hype and excitement dies down.
To play devil's advocate, isn't the wand experience thing still popular at Universal? I honestly don't know, so asking.

I think one of the biggest issues with this land is all that all the attractions etc. are themed after the sequel trilogy. A few years and decades down the line it's going to be as if they built a Star Wars land in the 2000's that was themed exclusively to the prequels and stayed that way forever. It's pretty wild to think about, but this land is now a core part of Disneyland FOREVER from here on, which is a big reason why theming a DL land after a specific IP and not a broader concept is a bad idea, even if its mega blockbuster timeless one like SW.
 

Touchdown

Well-Known Member
Also why in the world are they only offering the cookie with blue milk in the bar, everyone is going to want that accessory and flood the bar more.
 

Touchdown

Well-Known Member
It’s still super popular on Orlando. I had always vowed the only way I would buy one was if I was ever chosen for the show. Never thought I would but while I was there the day before the last Celebration of Harry Potter I ducked into one of the last wand fittings of the day. There was no kids in the show, I was chosen and am currently the proud owner of a English oak with dragon heartstring.

It’s a lot of fun to do the magic windows (especially in Diagonal Alley) and I usually spend one morning (when there is never a line) a trip doing them. I also look foreword to letting my nephew borrow one when he is old enough.
 

SirWillow

Well-Known Member
But go to 3 Broomsticks, and the place is packed on Slow Days, same with Moe's Tavern.
...
So yes, in 10 years, 200 seats will still probably not be enough seats for the Cantina.
Three Broomsticks is still packed with lines waiting to get in on slow days in Florida as well. So are many of the shops. That whole area is constantly busy, and it's one area that you wouldn't know a slow day was one except for the shorter lines for the Potter rides.

To play devil's advocate, isn't the wand experience thing still popular at Universal? I honestly don't know, so asking.
The two times that we wanted to do the wand show at Olivanders in the last year and a half, that's what we rope dropped. (We used the Universal Express pass for the rides). On days in mid January and February, when the park was slow, it had a 30 minute wait for it when we came out, and later on in the day it was posted at 45 minutes.

If Potter is any indication of what SW:GE is going to be like, all of it is going to be busy for years to come. Every bit of it.
 

mickEblu

Well-Known Member
You know I’m starting to feel really unappreciated by Disney. With all the time we spend talking about Disneyland and all the money we spend there- no invite? Feels like a very one sided relationship. It’s like when you watch your team lose and you re really upset but then see on TMZ they were out partying the same night, parking at the fancy restaurant in their Ferrari.
 
Top Bottom