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News Splash Mountain retheme to Princess and the Frog - Tiana's Bayou Adventure

Kirby86

Well-Known Member
You nailed it in the second part. I agree rides need maintenance. Just wish it didn’t go down every January because that’s when work allows me to go on vacation. Not really meant to be critical or controversial
Nah I get the feeling. I wanted to ride Jurrassic Park the last time I was in Islands of Adventures and I forgot it was closed because of refurbishment it's a bummer. The issue is January and February typically are the slowest time periods because of the cold and it's after Christmas and New Years.
 

MerlinTheGoat

Well-Known Member
Interesting. Wonder if their demo work would create some stability/structural integrity issues.
It would probably help to post a picture of the ride while it was still under construction and showing what it looks like without all the rockwork-

ib1-2_20140923_1353126651.jpg-nggid0515858-ngg0dyn-1024x687x90-00f0w010c010r110f110r010t010.jpg


The gray colored steel and concrete are the structural elements. Based on the model/render, the only structural element that seems to be getting altered is that beam at the peak used to stabilize the tree trunk. That piece also isn't part of the structural integrity of the rest of the mountain.

The reddish brown "netting" seen in the photo is a thin metal mesh they use to frame and apply the cosmetic concrete over. This layer of concrete is also fairly thin. To the degree that it's relatively easy to damage. Back in 2012 when the ride was in really poor condition, there were some sections outside right before the riverboat finale that had large holes in them. The inside was hollow and you could see this metal mesh sticking out of the very thin layer of concrete. This is how the interior scenery is structured as well.

Based on the models, it looks like they're not going to be tearing much of the rockwork off of the exterior. They're keeping most of it and just applying some additional paint and vegetation to make it look more swampy. WDW's variant is even seemingly retaining the "red clay" paint. The tree trunk is probably going to take the most effort since they need to cut that one steel beam. I suspect the briar patch doesn't even have such hefty support beams since the thorns are small.
 

MerlinTheGoat

Well-Known Member
Any one hear if they plan update the ride system/track so it requires less maintenance - if it’s even possible to do? A yearly shutdown of a new ride seems problematic.
I'm guessing they'll be making routine updates to some of the underlying electronics, sensors, worn out parts etc. But the ride is going to require occasional refurbishments at least every couple of years regardless of what they do. Hardware eventually wears out and needs repair, no matter how "modern" it is. Also, modern equipment doesn't necessarily guarantee longer lifespan/reliability, sometimes it does but sometimes it's the opposite.

One major trick to reducing the amount of long refurbs though is by conducting proper preventative maintenance on a daily basis as needed. Something the Disney company of today has become allergic to. It won't eliminate the need for the eventual month+ long refurbs, but it can help stretch it out so it doesn't need one every year or two. Also making those lengthy ones take less time as well.
 
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cwoms197

Member
Haven’t posted here in a while, but has anyone zoomed in on the nighttime concept art that was released at D23. Im a huge fan of Princess and the Frog because of Dr Facilier, and feel like this ride would not feel right without him included in some way, and noticed (circled in red) what looks to be a skull like figure just before the big drop. Am I looking too far into this, or does anyone else see it.
 

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MisterPenguin

🐧🐧Pfizer x2 🐧🐧🐧Moderna 2+bi🐧
Premium Member
Haven’t posted here in a while, but has anyone zoomed in on the nighttime concept art that was released at D23. Im a huge fan of Princess and the Frog because of Dr Facilier, and feel like this ride would not feel right without him included in some way, and noticed (circled in red) what looks to be a skull like figure just before the big drop. Am I looking too far into this, or does anyone else see it.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
$35 million is not the budget, it is FAR higher than that now. And despite the fact that Splash only just closed, they already had a bunch of stuff made in preparation. That includes props and new animatronics.

If nothing else, at least the ride structure, track etc are already there. So the budget and effort is all being poured into the "show" elements. They won't need to squander large sums of money on building a new facility and worry about a new ride system like Cosmic Rewind.
It’s a facility that has spent 30 years full of water, it should get some serious work.
I doubt any of that stuff will be trouble to demolish. Lot harder and more expensive to build things than it is to destroy them.
Just knocking things down without a care is easy and cheap. Selective demolition can be quite expensive.
In

Interesting. Wonder if their demo work would create some stability/structural integrity issues.

I also know one of the concerns about doing anything new to the PeopleMover in DL is that it wouldn’t be grandfathered under the ADA/OSHA. Presumptively a remake of this ride would mean they couldn’t grandfather in to pre-ADA regs (Splash constructed in ‘89; ADA passed in ‘90). Anyone know if Splash would’ve passed ADA muster?
There is no blanket rule of grandfathering and Chapter 11 of the California Building Standards Code has more stringent requirements for alterations than the 2010 ADA Design Guidelines; Florida Building Code, Accessibility or EPCOT Accessibility Code.
It would probably help to post a picture of the ride while it was still under construction and showing what it looks like without all the rockwork-

ib1-2_20140923_1353126651.jpg-nggid0515858-ngg0dyn-1024x687x90-00f0w010c010r110f110r010t010.jpg


The gray colored steel and concrete are the structural elements. Based on the model/render, the only structural element that seems to be getting altered is that beam at the peak used to stabilize the tree trunk. That piece also isn't part of the structural integrity of the rest of the mountain.

The reddish brown "netting" seen in the photo is a thin metal mesh they use to frame and apply the cosmetic concrete over. This layer of concrete is also fairly thin. To the degree that it's relatively easy to damage. Back in 2012 when the ride was in really poor condition, there were some sections outside right before the riverboat finale that had large holes in them. The inside was hollow and you could see this metal mesh sticking out of the very thin layer of concrete. This is how the interior scenery is structured as well.

Based on the models, it looks like they're not going to be tearing much of the rockwork off of the exterior. They're keeping most of it and just applying some additional paint and vegetation to make it look more swampy. WDW's variant is even seemingly retaining the "red clay" paint. The tree trunk is probably going to take the most effort since they need to cut that one steel beam. I suspect the briar patch doesn't even have such hefty support beams since the thorns are small.
That thin layer of cement plaster is what could lead to unexpected expenses regarding the primary structure. That it was able to deteriorate so much should call into question it’s efficacy as a building envelope.
 

MerlinTheGoat

Well-Known Member
Haven’t posted here in a while, but has anyone zoomed in on the nighttime concept art that was released at D23. Im a huge fan of Princess and the Frog because of Dr Facilier, and feel like this ride would not feel right without him included in some way, and noticed (circled in red) what looks to be a skull like figure just before the big drop. Am I looking too far into this, or does anyone else see it.
I think you're just seeing random colors and shapes reflecting on the walls from Mama Odie's colored bottles. Her character will probably be the focus of the final lift. Here's a closeup of the Disneyland model with a clearer view of the inside of the cave-

tianas-bayou-adventure-splash-mountain-reimagining-disneyland-california-400.jpg
 

MerlinTheGoat

Well-Known Member
It’s a facility that has spent 30 years full of water, it should get some serious work.
It should, and probably will. But it has gotten serious work numerous times before. It didn't just spend over 30 years without a single major refurb. It has had multiple major ones over the course of its life. Even on the final day of operation, despite a LOT of show quality issues, it was still in FAR better shape than it was in 2012. They restored it back to near opening day condition in less than two months back in 2013. I'm guessing it didn't cost nearly the amount of money that Tiana is going to.

Just knocking things down without a care is easy and cheap. Selective demolition can be quite expensive.
I agree, but again they're not exactly demolishing much on the exterior. Just removing the stump at the peak and replacing the briar patch with swamp grass. The interior is where the bulk of the drastic alterations are going to be.

That thin layer of cement plaster is what could lead to unexpected expenses regarding the primary structure. That it was able to deteriorate so much should call into question it’s efficacy as a building envelope.
Maybe, but I don't see them changing to a more sturdy method either. Though at the moment, the rockwork itself seems like it's in decent structural condition aside from faded paint. Giving it a routine repaint should also help slow down deterioration (another thing they often neglect to do). It's clear a repaint is included in the overhaul. It was again in more dire shape back in 2012, where there actually WAS damage to some of the rockwork due to prolonged neglect. Including also some pieces that broke off and fell into the loading area.
 
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MerlinTheGoat

Well-Known Member
I just had a thought. When's the last time WDI designed a ride with a onboard time of 15 minutes. It worries me the story points we've seen so far are so thin how is that going to be paced and hold our intrigue? What is the antagonist if there's no Dr. F.
I'm sort of assuming there won't be an antagonist. Frozen doesn't have one, the Beauty and the Beast ride in Tokyo pretty much lacks one as well (just a brief shadow silhouette of the mob outside a window).

Splash Mountain at WDW is 10 minutes long. The last ride they designed that lasts 15+ minutes on board a vehicle was probably Kilimanjaro Safaris (it's usually around 20 minutes unless there's a traffic jam). Prior to that, I think there was Great Movie Ride at 22 minutes and the Studio Backlot Tour at over 30 minutes. Though I forget if that's just the ride or also includes the preshow stuff. I also think it was longer back when it first opened, they demolished some of the areas it used to travel through.
 

Brian

Well-Known Member
I'm sort of assuming there won't be an antagonist. Frozen doesn't have one, the Beauty and the Beast ride in Tokyo pretty much lacks one as well (just a brief shadow silhouette of the mob outside a window).

Splash Mountain at WDW is 10 minutes long. The last ride they designed that lasts 15+ minutes on board a vehicle was probably Kilimanjaro Safaris (it's usually around 20 minutes unless there's a traffic jam). Prior to that, I think there was Great Movie Ride at 22 minutes and the Studio Backlot Tour at over 30 minutes. Though I forget if that's just the ride or also includes the preshow stuff. I also think it was longer back when it first opened, they demolished some of the areas it used to travel through.
Don't forget about Ellen's Energy Adventure, and the obvious antagonist, "stupid Judy." Clocked in at about 45 minutes.
 

Rich Brownn

Well-Known Member
This topic reminds me of that one time both Disneyland and Knott's Berry Farm created advertisements to honor both park's anniversaries back in 1980.

Knott's Berry Farm (which turned 60) created an advertisement featuring Mickey honoring Disneyland's 25th Anniversary published on January 1980.
View attachment 694570

Disneyland (which turned 25) created a sweet and heartfelt illustration of Mickey Mouse and a prospector (representing Knott's) that was published on six months later.
View attachment 694569

Here's more info from 8bitdan the original poster of those two ads.
"I work at Knotts and I thought this was kind of cool to share. Knotts Berry Farm (est. 1920) and Disneyland (est. 1955) are only about 7 miles apart. Walter Knott assisted Walt Disney in getting Disneyland off the ground. Interesting to see ads that show a rare relationship between what would normally be considered two "competing" businesses."

Stuff like this would sadly not happen nowadays.
Disney ran a nice ad when Universal opened in 1990. Showed Mickey's gloved hand reaching out to E.T's.
 

Smiley/OCD

Well-Known Member
It would probably help to post a picture of the ride while it was still under construction and showing what it looks like without all the rockwork-

ib1-2_20140923_1353126651.jpg-nggid0515858-ngg0dyn-1024x687x90-00f0w010c010r110f110r010t010.jpg


The gray colored steel and concrete are the structural elements. Based on the model/render, the only structural element that seems to be getting altered is that beam at the peak used to stabilize the tree trunk. That piece also isn't part of the structural integrity of the rest of the mountain.

The reddish brown "netting" seen in the photo is a thin metal mesh they use to frame and apply the cosmetic concrete over. This layer of concrete is also fairly thin. To the degree that it's relatively easy to damage. Back in 2012 when the ride was in really poor condition, there were some sections outside right before the riverboat finale that had large holes in them. The inside was hollow and you could see this metal mesh sticking out of the very thin layer of concrete. This is how the interior scenery is structured as well.

Based on the models, it looks like they're not going to be tearing much of the rockwork off of the exterior. They're keeping most of it and just applying some additional paint and vegetation to make it look more swampy. WDW's variant is even seemingly retaining the "red clay" paint. The tree trunk is probably going to take the most effort since they need to cut that one steel beam. I suspect the briar patch doesn't even have such hefty support beams since the thorns are small.
Great picture and I can see the ladder in the bottom left corner!
 

EPCOT-O.G.

Well-Known Member
I wasn't able to find the ET ad but I found this one.
Sentinel%20Ad%20June%207%201990%20Image%20c%20Disney.jpg


It just reminds me that the Disney of today doesn't have even a fraction of integrity of the Disney of old.
Ah yes, the halcyon days when Disney was welcoming and kind to Universal in Florida…by quickly green lighting Disney MGM Studios and essentially copying the USH concept, right down to the backstage studio tour, in an effort to beat them to the punch
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
It should, and probably will. But it has gotten serious work numerous times before. It didn't just spend over 30 years without a single major refurb. It has had multiple major ones over the course of its life. Even on the final day of operation, despite a LOT of show quality issues, it was still in FAR better shape than it was in 2012. They restored it back to near opening day condition in less than two months back in 2013. I'm guessing it didn't cost nearly the amount of money that Tiana is going to.


I agree, but again they're not exactly demolishing much on the exterior. Just removing the stump at the peak and replacing the briar patch with swamp grass. The interior is where the bulk of the drastic alterations are going to be.


Maybe, but I don't see them changing to a more sturdy method either. Though at the moment, the rockwork itself seems like it's in decent structural condition aside from faded paint. And it's clear a repaint is included in the overhaul. It was again in more dire shape back in 2012, where there actually WAS damage to some of the rockwork. Including also some pieces that broke off and fell into the loading area.
Serious work and refurbishment is not usually the same as engaging in demolition work. There is a significant amount of structure within the interior. Not touching the exterior means nothing when it comes to having to work around the structure and possibility of discovering issues that will require repair.
 

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