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News Splash Mountain retheme to Princess and the Frog - Tiana's Bayou Adventure

Ghost93

Well-Known Member
I'm all about people being smart enough to put things in context, but Disney has decided they don't want guests at their parks to have to do that. There were calls for Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn to be banned long before Disney recognized Song of the South as being offensive. Regardless of your personal opinions on the matter, you have to recognize that it would be a target for Disney's sensitivity / inclusiveness team.
Honestly, I think Frontierland as a whole might be eyed for a retheme, as Disney may see it as representing the Native American genocide that happened when settlers moved out west. If Splash Mountain is being rethemed, Disney may want to retheme the area around it in Magic Kingdom so that it doesn't feel out of place.
 

SamusAranX

Well-Known Member
I very much doubt it, for two reasons:

1. It's a pretty bad movie, except for the animated sequences.

2. It's Disney, and therefore expected to be suitable for children.

These conditions make the film far more difficult to redeem than, say, Gone with the Wind, which is a critically acclaimed movie primarily aimed at adult audiences.
You right. Better stop all those children from being indoctrinated into racism by riding that.
 

seabreezept813

Well-Known Member
I very much doubt it, for two reasons:

1. It's a pretty bad movie, except for the animated sequences.

2. It's Disney, and therefore expected to be suitable for children.

These conditions make the film far more difficult to redeem than, say, Gone with the Wind, which is a critically acclaimed movie primarily aimed at adult audiences.
Maybe Gone With the Wind wasn’t the best example.. maybe I just have a mom who watches a lot of TCM.. but most movies of that age had very questionable artistic styles (think blackface). Holiday Inn, Yankee Doodle, Shirley Temple that were created for a family audience. These films are still shown regularly with historians talking ahead of time about the value in what is created but also the glaring problems we would take offense to today. The Music Man and Hello Dolly (major influences and music style for Main St USA) have some scenes that would be offensive for Native Americans and women. If you do a deep dive it’s seen in most cinema of that era.
 

skypilot2922

Well-Known Member
Maybe Gone With the Wind wasn’t the best example.. maybe I just have a mom who watches a lot of TCM.. but most movies of that age had very questionable artistic styles (think blackface). Holiday Inn, Yankee Doodle, Shirley Temple that were created for a family audience. These films are still shown regularly with historians talking ahead of time about the value in what is created but also the glaring problems we would take offense to today. The Music Man and Hello Dolly (major influences and music style for Main St USA) have some scenes that would be offensive for Native Americans and women. If you do a deep dive it’s seen in most cinema of that era.

Cinema is a reflection of its time
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
Maybe Gone With the Wind wasn’t the best example.. maybe I just have a mom who watches a lot of TCM.. but most movies of that age had very questionable artistic styles (think blackface). Holiday Inn, Yankee Doodle, Shirley Temple that were created for a family audience. These films are still shown regularly with historians talking ahead of time about the value in what is created but also the glaring problems we would take offense to today. The Music Man and Hello Dolly (major influences and music style for Main St USA) have some scenes that would be offensive for Native Americans and women. If you do a deep dive it’s seen in most cinema of that era.
You’re not telling me anything I don’t already know. How many children today routinely watch those films? For better or worse, the Disney brand brings with it a certain set of expectations that make it much harder to give a film like Song of the South the TCM treatment.
 
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TikibirdLand

Well-Known Member
I don’t understand what you’re trying to say with this comment, or how it relates to my post.
I think they're trying to find anything that's racist about the current ride. Without context of the movie tie-in, I have trouble finding that too... Unless you'd seen the movie (unlikely, since it's been buried for decades) or read commentary about it (more likely), I'm not sure one would even know about SoS. And, they'd miss the wonderful performance of James Baskett as Uncle Remus. But, I digress.
 

Incomudro

Well-Known Member
Honestly, I think Frontierland as a whole might be eyed for a retheme, as Disney may see it as representing the Native American genocide that happened when settlers moved out west. If Splash Mountain is being rethemed, Disney may want to retheme the area around it in Magic Kingdom so that it doesn't feel out of place.
Next up: Liberty Square
That bastion of Colonialism lead by old white males.
Followed by: Main Street
That lily white idyllic moment in time.

There was a time when I would say those things entirely in jest.
Now, it doesn't seem far fetched at all.
 

Disney Analyst

Well-Known Member
Honestly, I think Frontierland as a whole might be eyed for a retheme, as Disney may see it as representing the Native American genocide that happened when settlers moved out west. If Splash Mountain is being rethemed, Disney may want to retheme the area around it in Magic Kingdom so that it doesn't feel out of place.

I think Disney could keep Frontierland IF they add some educational aspects that discuss the history. Edutainment of sorts.

The issue I have is when they romanticize the past in a way that further hinders people today. Let’s keep it light, but not shy away from being truthful on what the “Wild West” was.
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
I think Disney could keep Frontierland IF they add some educational aspects that discuss the history. Edutainment of sorts.

The issue I have is when they romanticize the past in a way that further hinders people today. Let’s keep it light, but not shy away from being truthful on what the “Wild West” was.
I don’t think it’s possible to do what you’re suggesting without introducing some pretty heavy topics that would both clash with the escapism of the Magic Kingdom and be poorly (even inappropriately) framed by it.
 

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