Snoring Strategy for Hotel/Room Booking

HouCuseChickie

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
We're currently booked in a deluxe studio at the Poly in Feb 2020. I presented the family with a lot of options before deciding on that resort and room. We just got back from a non-Disney road trip and my husband's snoring is causing me to rethink these plans. In the past, I was the only one ever really bothered by it, so I just dealt with the noise and sleep deprivation. Now that our kids are older, they have become more sensitive sleepers and are impacted as well. My original resort list had a suite at AOA as well as adjoining rooms at Pop and CBR as options for this reason. I like the kitchen aspect of the suite, but I think we'd be more comfortable in adjoining rooms. I've also heard that walls are thinner in the suites and that we may have issues since they can't guarantee adjoining rooms...or so I've heard.

I would prefer to stay at the Poly, especially since my parents will be at the GF (they don't care for the Poly), but two rooms at the Poly is out of the budget. The kids suggested they spend some of the nights with grandma and grandpa at the GF so that we can stick with our Poly lodging, that way DH and I can be farther apart in separate beds. Still, I think the kids forgot that grandma also snores 😴

What would you do? I feel really silly posting this thread, but I'm just wondering what others would do in this situation.
 

Disneyfreak Jen

Well-Known Member
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Being kept awake by someone’s snoring can be so frustrating, my sympathies as I’ve been there, it’s not easy to deal with. You and the kids will need to sleep well to get the most of your Disney trip that you’re paying a lot of money for. I think any room option that you mentioned could work, but consider using a white noise app on your phone at night to help drown out the sound too. Start using the white noise app a few nights prior to your trip to get used to it.
 

MickeyCB

Well-Known Member
Not sleeping well due to your traveling companions isn't silly at all! One time I was so frustrated with my husband's snoring I was ready to drag a mattress into the bathroom!
Some options to consider that I've learned help include, any white noise- a fan, or phone app with a fan noise (I've used a fan for 30 years nightly), ear plugs and a sleep aid for you if you tolerate them.
Other options are a 1 or 2 bedroom villa to be able to spread out a little better.
 

larryz

Gold Star Duck
Premium Member
We're currently booked in a deluxe studio at the Poly in Feb 2020. I presented the family with a lot of options before deciding on that resort and room. We just got back from a non-Disney road trip and my husband's snoring is causing me to rethink these plans. In the past, I was the only one ever really bothered by it, so I just dealt with the noise and sleep deprivation. Now that our kids are older, they have become more sensitive sleepers and are impacted as well. My original resort list had a suite at AOA as well as adjoining rooms at Pop and CBR as options for this reason. I like the kitchen aspect of the suite, but I think we'd be more comfortable in adjoining rooms. I've also heard that walls are thinner in the suites and that we may have issues since they can't guarantee adjoining rooms...or so I've heard.

I would prefer to stay at the Poly, especially since my parents will be at the GF (they don't care for the Poly), but two rooms at the Poly is out of the budget. The kids suggested they spend some of the nights with grandma and grandpa at the GF so that we can stick with our Poly lodging, that way DH and I can be farther apart in separate beds. Still, I think the kids forgot that grandma also snores 😴

What would you do? I feel really silly posting this thread, but I'm just wondering what others would do in this situation.
Definitely get multiple rooms -- for what Disney charges for a suite, you can probably get 3 of them.
 

HouCuseChickie

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Thanks everyone! I have a lot of different strategies I've tried over the years. I always have ear plugs with me and I have an app on my phone called Sleep Machine, which allows me to set four sounds at once in varying volume levels. I also try to sleep with my head at his feet so that I'm not right near the source of the snoring. I've also tried wearing my big noise canceling headphones, but they are too bulky and either come off in the night due to comfort issues or cause muscle strain, since keeping them on forces me into strange positions. One of the mornings this trip, I even woke up with a blanket wrapped around my head. I guess in my sleep, I was scrambling for more of a noise barrier.

Unfortunately, he is LOUD! Like @NYwdwfan 's mom, I think DH could wake the dead. At home, I usually sleep in our guest room. In our last house, that room was right over the master and I could often hear him through the vents and floor. I don't know how accurate it is, but I have a decibel meter app and at his loudest, he's usually between 75-85 dB. I've resorted to things like @MickeyCB noted. I recall one trip where I grabbed as much bedding, pillows and fluffy stuff as possible and tried to sleep in the bathtub.

@Nunu Do you have any recs? I have all kinds of earplugs and buy for the highest decibel level I can find, but I have yet to find anything to drown him out. I've thought about some kind of wireless earbuds, so they act as earplugs while also playing the noise app sounds into my ears.
 

Queen of the WDW Scene

Premium Member
In the Parks
No
Thanks everyone! I have a lot of different strategies I've tried over the years. I always have ear plugs with me and I have an app on my phone called Sleep Machine, which allows me to set four sounds at once in varying volume levels. I also try to sleep with my head at his feet so that I'm not right near the source of the snoring. I've also tried wearing my big noise canceling headphones, but they are too bulky and either come off in the night due to comfort issues or cause muscle strain, since keeping them on forces me into strange positions. One of the mornings this trip, I even woke up with a blanket wrapped around my head. I guess in my sleep, I was scrambling for more of a noise barrier.

Unfortunately, he is LOUD! Like @NYwdwfan 's mom, I think DH could wake the dead. At home, I usually sleep in our guest room. In our last house, that room was right over the master and I could often hear him through the vents and floor. I don't know how accurate it is, but I have a decibel meter app and at his loudest, he's usually between 75-85 dB. I've resorted to things like @MickeyCB noted. I recall one trip where I grabbed as much bedding, pillows and fluffy stuff as possible and tried to sleep in the bathtub.

@Nunu Do you have any recs? I have all kinds of earplugs and buy for the highest decibel level I can find, but I have yet to find anything to drown him out. I've thought about some kind of wireless earbuds, so they act as earplugs while also playing the noise app sounds into my ears.
Maybe see if he needs a CPAP before your next trip. If he is THAT loud then it seems like it could be a health issue for EVERYONE.
 

Nunu

Premium Member
Thanks everyone! I have a lot of different strategies I've tried over the years. I always have ear plugs with me and I have an app on my phone called Sleep Machine, which allows me to set four sounds at once in varying volume levels. I also try to sleep with my head at his feet so that I'm not right near the source of the snoring. I've also tried wearing my big noise canceling headphones, but they are too bulky and either come off in the night due to comfort issues or cause muscle strain, since keeping them on forces me into strange positions. One of the mornings this trip, I even woke up with a blanket wrapped around my head. I guess in my sleep, I was scrambling for more of a noise barrier.

Unfortunately, he is LOUD! Like @NYwdwfan 's mom, I think DH could wake the dead. At home, I usually sleep in our guest room. In our last house, that room was right over the master and I could often hear him through the vents and floor. I don't know how accurate it is, but I have a decibel meter app and at his loudest, he's usually between 75-85 dB. I've resorted to things like @MickeyCB noted. I recall one trip where I grabbed as much bedding, pillows and fluffy stuff as possible and tried to sleep in the bathtub.

@Nunu Do you have any recs? I have all kinds of earplugs and buy for the highest decibel level I can find, but I have yet to find anything to drown him out. I've thought about some kind of wireless earbuds, so they act as earplugs while also playing the noise app sounds into my ears.
I use the foamy pre-shaped types, the ones you roll and let "grow" inside the ears. You could also ask your optometrist about custom-made earplugs, all that is needed is a mold of your inner ears for a perfect fit and optimal noise cancelling.
 

Heppenheimer

Well-Known Member
Mind you, it's been over three decades since I stayed there, but if the basic interior design hasn't changed, the Cabins at Ft. Wilderness had a back-bedroom, and a double Murphy bed in the front room. The walls might not be thick enough to completely block out the snoring, but at least if you close the door between the two rooms, the sound should at least be muffled. And this assumes the Cabins are even open again for your trip.

My sympathies. Although I appreciate all the vacations my parents provided for us when we were kids, if we were all in one hotel room, I always hoped I would fall asleep before my dad. Otherwise, his bear-like snoring would keep me awake for hours.
 

COrunner

Well-Known Member
I know that this won't fit everyones situation but I travel with friends on a golf trip where 1-2 guys are heavy snorers and when my parents have joined our trips my dad is as well. My go tos:

1. noise canceling headphones. I tried an app and machine but the cadence of snoring to white noise was never something I could 'drown out' but when I got a pair of active headphones (I bought an old pair of bose quiet comfort ones as a test off ebay) and they worked really well.

2. melatonin and Tylenol PM. Again, not a doctor but when I absolutely have to sleep usually half a dose of Tylenol PM or some melatonin knocks me out. I've had decent success using that as well.
 

NiarrNDisney

Well-Known Member
I have found these essentials as necessary when sharing a room or space when traveling. The fan is great for pointing at ones bed to cool it down (not freezing out others) and block out noise, eye mask to block out light (should they be up on a computer or reading), ear plugs for myself and others, travel rechargeable L.E.D lights so you can turn any mirror in the space as an extra place to get ready, a small power strip (there's never enough plugs), a door organizer to keep down clutter around the sink and bathroom, a travel hamper (cuts down on clutter and helps if you are doing laundry), and finally the most important things outside of the ear plugs a bottle of Febreeze and toilet spray for the bathroom.

edit: Almost all of these items can be found at your local Dollar Tree or Target and of course Amazon.
 

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J_Krafty24

Active Member
I 2nd (3rd?) The suggestion of talking to the Dr about the possibility of sleep apnea. I have had 3 very loud snorers in my life, all three have gone to the doctor and had sleep studies. All 3 have had pretty severe sleep apnea. All 3 got CPAP machines, have stopped snoring and now have much happier partners/families. Bonus, they also get better quality sleep now.

A lot of people see snoring as something harmless that you can't control but in many cases it is a sign of serious but treatable medical conditions.
 

HouCuseChickie

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
I 2nd (3rd?) The suggestion of talking to the Dr about the possibility of sleep apnea. I have had 3 very loud snorers in my life, all three have gone to the doctor and had sleep studies. All 3 have had pretty severe sleep apnea. All 3 got CPAP machines, have stopped snoring and now have much happier partners/families. Bonus, they also get better quality sleep now.

A lot of people see snoring as something harmless that you can't control but in many cases it is a sign of serious but treatable medical conditions.
Oh I agree. I got him to see a dr a number of years ago. The dr didn't see anything critical during his consultation and gave him a few things to try and help. My husband was supposed to follow up when none of those things worked, but he decided his snoring wasn't a him problem. 🙄 So, he never followed up beyond that. I personally think he needs to let them observe him while he sleeps, because I feel there may be some sleep apnea in the mix. Unfortunately, I can't make him go see anyone about it. So, just trying to find solutions to the "me" part of this equation while hoping it doesn't create any more serious medical issues for him.
 
Well, I'm the snorer in the family. I've done everything to try and fix the problem (no sleep apnea). I've recently discovered that I actually have acid reflux. I bought a pillow wedge and voila! hubby is getting much better sleep. I'm adjusting to this new sleep apparatus but I still sleep at his feet until I can get my arrangement nailed down. My sleep wedge is going with me to the Fort Wilderness cabins in December.

The cabins do have a good distance and a door between the bedroom and the fold out couch which we used in the past. Works great with the bedroom also having our white noise machine. Yeah! Takes years to figure this out.
 

NiarrNDisney

Well-Known Member
I have also found wearing a nightguard also helps with snoring. You can find the one you mold yourself pretty much anywhere (Target, Walgreens, Walmart etc)
 

HouCuseChickie

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Well, I'm the snorer in the family. I've done everything to try and fix the problem (no sleep apnea). I've recently discovered that I actually have acid reflux. I bought a pillow wedge and voila! hubby is getting much better sleep. I'm adjusting to this new sleep apparatus but I still sleep at his feet until I can get my arrangement nailed down. My sleep wedge is going with me to the Fort Wilderness cabins in December.

The cabins do have a good distance and a door between the bedroom and the fold out couch which we used in the past. Works great with the bedroom also having our white noise machine. Yeah! Takes years to figure this out.
I do recall the doctor suggesting acid reflux as a potential problem. He was given some meds as well as a night guard. I got him into the gastroenterologist a couple of years ago for unrelated issues, but naturally the snoring never came up. Still one issue could be triggering another. I don't know if he'd agree to the pillow, but it's an idea.

Sadly, our solution has been separate rooms for quite some time. I guess on the plus side, we're both sleeping, which is important. I think 1998 was when I started to give up on on a restful night of sleep in the same room with him. I had a cabin booked for part of our 2019 trip that we wound up rescheduling. I like the idea, but have a feeling I'd be driving more with a stay there. We're contemplating a long weekend getaway before Disney and I'm looking at the little headphones below as a potential solution. If they work, we'll have our answer. They should cancel noise like an earplug, but put my sleep machine noises directly into my ears to aid in drowning him out. If not, I'll just have a new set of headphones and will likely go back to weighing out the pros and cons of the suite vs. connecting rooms.

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