Quitting Smoking

englanddg

One Little Spark...
Premium Member
Original Poster
Ok, so I'm on day 4 of quitting smoking for good.

I don't mean a short break (I do that most Disney trips, as I don't like to smoke around the kid, and I'd sneak out after she was asleep and smoke by the lake at CBR or Pop, but not during the day)...

I mean quitting. I am a pack to a pack and a half a day smoker, and after some health issues last year, and earlier this year, I have decided enough is enough. None of those health issues were smoking related, but it doesn't help.

So, Tuesday, I went to the doc and we'd talked about quitting before. She gave me a prescription for Chantix. I must say, after 4 days, it's working fine. I feel no urge to smoke...however, I still do (she told me this is expected, habit vs addiction, and to give it a few weeks before it goes away)...

Anyhow, my question is this.

I've had a terrible time sleeping. I can't go to sleep. I've tried warm milk, even sleeping pills, and I can't seem to fall asleep.

My GP said that I could have these issues, specifically in the first few weeks of quitting, so I'm not worried about it medically, but it's very annoying.

Has anyone else been down this road? Do you have any advice?
 

Nemo14

Well-Known Member
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No advise here really, but kudos to you for kicking the habit. I know it's tough.
 

englanddg

One Little Spark...
Premium Member
Original Poster
Once your lungs figure out that they don't have to keep this all in anymore...

Lets just say my mornings are not so pleasant.

Not to be too graphic, but my friend who quit last year calls it lung butter....it's an apt description.
 

disney1077

Well-Known Member
Congrats on quittings smoking! My dad was a heavy smoker and had to quit because of health reasons and it was the best thing he ever did. Sorry dont have any advice for helping you to sleep at night. All I know is things get easier as time passes.
 

englanddg

One Little Spark...
Premium Member
Original Poster
I suspect it will get easier, but not being able to sleep well really annoys me.

And when I do sleep, I've been having rather bad dreams.

The other night (not last night, but Thursday night) I had a nightmare, and yeah, I'll call it that, where I thought I'd overslept and the kid and I had missed our bus to go on our Disney Cruise in August.

It was terrifying!
 

momof1princess

Well-Known Member
The nightmares are probably the meds, and will go away. I've tried to quit before and failed, it is rather hard. Best of luck to you, make sure to reward yourself as, you reach small milestones, it helps to remember how far you've come. If I quit again, I'll have to stop drinking too, I don't indulge that way much, but it's what tripped me up before. So watch out for that, if its an issue for you. Good luck!
 

Freshee61

Well-Known Member
I've quit many times each time it gets easier.
Recognize that the habit itself is what your fighting the most and fight by reminding yourself you don't want to die a painful cancer death because of this needless habit.
For the addiction part drink lots of juice to flush out system and to keep your sugar levels up. Exercise like jogging helps the body with the addiction and like the old saying goes practice makes perfect. You have to take it one day at a time. Every new day say I choose not to smoke.
Good luck and trust in yourself that you can do it and then you will.
 

BoarderPhreak

Well-Known Member
I've taken Chantix three times. The third time was indeed a charm - and I've been smoke-free for TEN MONTHS now - w00t! The first two times I didn't go the full three month course... And got sucked back in. The third month did it for me.

Chantix has some side effects, as you've noticed. I happen to like the whack, vivid dreams, which is probably the most common. It does get a little better over time, but never really goes away until you stop the Chantix. Learn to embrace them and rest assured that in three months they'll be gone - and more importantly, that it's a small sacrifice for the greater goal.

You'll breathe so much better and lose The Cough quickly, smell and taste things better over time and won't have to stand in the corner outside in all sorts of weather, made to feel like a criminal... And best of all, you'll save hundreds of dollars a month! Here in NY it's bad, especially in NYC - where a pack is something like $10+. Insane, when you think that in the Caribbean you can get a whole carton for $14!

I've tried gums, patches, all that crap - countless times - in the end, Chantix worked great for me. Hang in there!
 

Uncle Lupe

Well-Known Member
This has to be a very difficult but you can do it. Maybe keep track of you much money you are not spending on the habit. Throw it in a "I Quit " jar so you can see a physical representation of the amount not just numbers on paper.
 

BoarderPhreak

Well-Known Member
I just puked again...is this normal?
Not in my case - not even once. Of course, you (and everyone else) are different. Give it a little time and see if you get used to the medication (that is, stop puking).

Chantix doesn't really have doses, unlike patches. So it's all or nothing. If you can't live with the side effects you might have to consider alternative options. :(
 

trr1

Well-Known Member
I quit smoking 15 years ago and I used the patch. it took me 3 time to quit so i know what you are going through
and i remember those strange dreams some were about smoking also or some time just after quitting i would be driving down the road and
would see others smoking and would think about following them:oops:. watch out for the hand mouth association you can easily put on weight by needing that action . even after 15 years i still crave a smoke when i get really stressed. good luck
 

BoarderPhreak

Well-Known Member
^ Ha, so true. I do smell smoke (from others) and think, "man, I'd love one right now." But you have to be strong. Especially after meals or when drinking...

The patch was interesting. It too gave dreams, but the most bizarre was when applying a fresh patch. It felt like someone punched you in the arm for a half hour or so. :p

No matter how you quit, time is the great equalizer. You'll want a smoke less and less over time.
 

luv

Well-Known Member
I used the patch so I would know my cravings were habit-based and not physical. I also knew that if I started smoking with the patch, it could be dangerous, so I would not be able to smoke.

It was so hard. The whole oral thing is the hardest to beat. I started supplementing with Twizzlers and French fries...but that would have packed on the pounds, so I switched to water from a straw. Not as good. It's the whole hand-to-mouth thing that was hard for me.

Also the moments where you forget you've quit and want to smoke, like after a meal or after a shower or whatever. "Time for a cigarette! Oh. Wait. It isn't. Ummmm...."

In the car was tough, too.

On occasion, I still get a little jealous of smokers. I see them and I want one.

But eventually, it all eases up, you don't crave them any longer and you don't want one. Plus, the smell. Ugh.

Your sense of smell returns when you quit, which is not always a good thing, lol. It's good for flowers and stuff. But there are unpleasant odors you were missing. You will notice how badly some smokers stink.

The phlegm thing ends. You'll notice that after a while you don't have to clear your throat all the time, too.

It's all good. Stick with it. You'll be so glad you did!
 

luv

Well-Known Member
Oh, I'm sticking it through...but, it sucks. Right now I'm fidgeting my **** off...
I was VERY fidgety. I cleaned everything. My house, my car, other people's cars. Anything I could do to keep my hands busy.

I also started chewing sugarless gum. It is a habit I continue to this day. I swapped my smoking addiction for a gum one, lol. I must have gum at all times. It's easier than keeping cigarettes in the house. :)
 
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