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Protest at Disney cancelled

aw14

Well-Known Member
As somebody who suffers from anxiety, the fact that someone who is quantifying the majority of anxiety as "not real" has had young adults under their wing for 16+ years is concerning.
so your personal situation correlates to my experiences? intriguing
 

disneygeek90

Well-Known Member
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nothing like over exaggeration.:rolleyes:

every other week? Lets place a little blame on the media for being dishonest. Counting a random suicide at a school playground on a friday night as a school shooting.

School, grades, friends and sports have been a fairly universal problem since the advent of public school. Nothing new here. Much of this is a parental issue and not allowing kids to learn the skills to overcome. Most parents now more so than I have ever seen want to clear every path for their kids and want to make sure that they never fail. Overcoming and "toughing out" a situation are important life skills.
Sorry, every other month. Is that better?

Kids are literally dying in schools and your solution is "tough it out." Interesting.
 

aw14

Well-Known Member
Sorry, every other month. Is that better?

Kids are literally dying in schools and your solution is "tough it out." Interesting.
lol...you might want better reading comprehension. Your attempt to discredit a statement by trying to combine two unrelated statements is sad and misleading. Not surprising sadly.

Back to the issue at hand. You might want to look at school shooting statistics before over exaggerating.
 

Gitson Shiggles

There was me, that is Mickey, and my three droogs
Original Poster
As somebody who suffers from anxiety, the fact that someone who is quantifying the majority of anxiety as "not real" has had young adults under their wing for 16+ years is concerning.
I deal with anxiety as well. My son has it worse than I do. Much of the time, his anxiety isn’t grounded in reality. Sometimes my anxiety isn’t either.
 

LukeS7

Well-Known Member
so your personal situation correlates to my experiences? intriguing
No at all what I said. My personal situation (as somebody who actually has what we're talking about) gives me a better perspective on whether it's "real" or not. On top of that, as someone who has gone through training for and helped others with anxiety, telling someone what they're feeling is "not real" and invalidating it is about the worst thing you can do and can lead to more serious issues.
 

aw14

Well-Known Member
I deal with anxiety as well. My son has it worse than I do. Much of the time, his anxiety isn’t grounded in reality. Sometimes my anxiety isn’t either.
thank you...this was my point
No at all what I said. My personal situation (as somebody who actually has what we're talking about) gives me a better perspective on whether it's "real" or not. On top of that, as someone who has gone through training for and helped others with anxiety, telling someone what they're feeling is "not real" and invalidating it is about the worst thing you can do and can lead to more serious issues.
I have gone through many trainings as well. Not once did I state that I would say to a student..."its not real". Folks, again, please read appropriately.
 

Gitson Shiggles

There was me, that is Mickey, and my three droogs
Original Poster
No at all what I said. My personal situation (as somebody who actually has what we're talking about) gives me a better perspective on whether it's "real" or not. On top of that, as someone who has gone through training for and helped others with anxiety, telling someone what they're feeling is "not real" and invalidating it is about the worst thing you can do and can lead to more serious issues.
Yet no one should reinforce unrealistic/irrational thoughts that are contributing to the anxiety. Those thoughts need to be addressed. This is a cornerstone of CBT.
 

disneygeek90

Well-Known Member
lol...you might want better reading comprehension. Your attempt to discredit a statement by trying to combine two unrelated statements is sad and misleading. Not surprising sadly.

Back to the issue at hand. You might want to look at school shooting statistics before over exaggerating.
https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/02/us/school-shootings-2018-list-trnd/index.html

17 dead in one incident in February.
10 dead in one incident in May.

Are those statistically relevant enough for you?
 

disneygeek90

Well-Known Member
yes, awful no two ways about it, and two more than there should be.

However, your frequency argument is proven incorrect.
Okay. So there's only been 2 shootings of 10+ casualties within a 4 month span. That's nothing to be proud of and also doesn't negate the fact that others have lost their lives, even if it was only one death.
 

aw14

Well-Known Member
Okay. So there's only been 2 shootings of 10+ casualties within a 4 month span. That also doesn't negate the others that have lost their lives, even if it was only one death.
Quite a few of the ones in the article you posted were not students at the institution. Some were people on a campus when it happened.

My point is, by lumping this all together demeans the horrors of an actual school shooting and most certainly will not lead to any change or productive discussion.
 

LukeS7

Well-Known Member
yes, awful no two ways about it, and two more than there should be. BTW, did you read all their incidents? Accidental discharge counts as a school shooting?

However, your frequency argument is proven incorrect.
From the same link and factoring out accidental or domestic dispute incidents, there's still 5 school shootings (quantifying this as someone going into a school with the intent to harm as many as possible) in 5 months. That's once a month.

Quite a few of the ones in the article you posted were not students at the institution. Some were people on a campus when it happened.

My point is, by lumping this all together demeans the horrors of an actual school shooting and most certainly will not lead to any change or productive discussion.
I do agree that lumping them all together is watering down the actual facts and arguments though.
 

LukeS7

Well-Known Member
Yet no one should reinforce unrealistic/irrational thoughts that are contributing to the anxiety. Those thoughts need to be addressed. This is a cornerstone of CBT.
Fair. I took the initial quote as "anxiety isn't real" rather than "the causes behind the anxiety aren't real/justified", so it appears it was just a misunderstanding
 

disneygeek90

Well-Known Member
Quite a few of the ones in the article you posted were not students at the institution. Some were people on a campus when it happened.

My point is, by lumping this all together demeans the horrors of an actual school shooting and most certainly will not lead to any change or productive discussion.
Even if we choose to ignore the small incidents, the large incidents can not be ignored and there's a mass shooting in this country far more often than pretty much any other developed country in the world. And even more tragically, schools have been a major target. Students have a right to want change more than anyone.
 

Andrew C

You know what's funny?
Premium Member
Even if we choose to ignore the small incidents, the large incidents can not be ignored and there's a mass shooting in this country far more often than pretty much any other developed country in the world. And even more tragically, schools have been a major target. Students have a right to want change more than anyone.
No one is really ignoring it. People just have different potential solutions to deal with it. And due to this, we end up many times not doing much, at least at a federal level.
 

21stamps

Well-Known Member
I hate to bring a little reality into this.. but can we stop with the “Parkland students because they witnessed their classmates die”?

First of all, it’s not ALL Parkland students, it’s a specific group of them, let’s call them ‘Group A’

Second of all, there is also another group who does not agree with Group A. (This group just gets less face time in television and print)

Thirdly, there are parents of the deceased students who are actively trying to change school safety, yet they’re not on the cover of Time either.

Group A is being exploited by the media because of their political leanings and turning the shootings into a reason to vote out Republicans.

If you aren’t aware of anyone besides Group A , then the media has accomplished exactly what they set out to do.
Maybe take a moment to learn about what ALL Parkland kids/parents are doing.. stop using emotions to make a point. Just be smart without someone telling you what to think.
 

aw14

Well-Known Member
Has anyone heard of a thing called solidarity?
of course. Is the suggestion that all students across the country should stand together?

The problem is, when kids are allowed into the fray its gets a little hairy and can tarnish what they are trying to accomplish. Allowing them to yell and scream at people (CNN conference with Rubio as an example) does not help their cause and will not lead to any productive change.
 

21stamps

Well-Known Member
Has anyone heard of a thing called solidarity?
Solidarity with whom? You all are talking about solidarity with a group of kids who are acting like brats, completely condescending, and are using the deaths of classmates for a political agenda. I do think they want shootings to stop, but they’ve twisted this into something much more.. all the while being hateful and attention-craving about it.

Have you watched/donate/attended any events/gofundme put on by the actual victim’s families?
Do you even know they exist? Do you know that celebrities have donated millions towards these walks, but not towards safety platforms which could actually make a difference?
 
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