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Pandoran problems 4.25.18

disney4life2008

Well-Known Member
I'd argue EPCOT is just as much worth a one-day admission. Depending on your tastes and what you like to do in a day, maybe even more so.



.

I actually agree, depending on taste. It's well worth it if you want to eat and drink plus take in what's left. But a family of four was the question.
 

WondersOfLife

Blink, blink. Breathe, breathe. Day in, day out.
I don’t understand your question.
I think he was trying to make a point about Wonders of Life being a "shared attractions building" and it being defunct.

I'm also assuming he is unaware of the actual reason it closed down.

I'm ALSO assuming he is unaware of literally every other pavilion in Future World.
 

matt9112

Well-Known Member
I'd argue EPCOT is just as much worth a one-day admission. Depending on your tastes and what you like to do in a day, maybe even more so.



.

I agree if your ok with spending a few hundred bucks so in reality is it worth that much? one day is like 300+ soo....is it worth that?

you walk in and eat a QSR lunch and that's it? nah not worth entry.
 

matt9112

Well-Known Member
Lets just look at those terms of service that are part of every admission media purchase:

Parks, restaurants, attractions, recreation, FastPass+ selections, entertainment, and other products, services or items are subject to change without notice, cancellation, and may close temporarily due to rehabilitation, refurbishing, capacity, seasonal, inclement weather or special events and may otherwise change or be discontinued without notice and without liability to the owners of the Walt Disney World® Resort. Ticket media is not valid for special or premium events or other activities which are separately priced. Admission entitlements are non-transferrable, not for resale, and must be used by the same person on any and all days. Age restrictions apply for access to certain facilities. Guests must be 21 years of age or older with valid proof of age to redeem alcohol entitlements.

It doesnt say that if Dumbo isnt spinning around in circles, you get a free premium Mickey Bar from Walt's Cryovault.

optics bro....the fine print is irrelevant.
 

ford91exploder

Resident Curmudgeon
optics bro....the fine print is irrelevant.

Actually not, The fine print says that all Disney needs to do is to allow you into the park, There is no guarantee that ANY attractions, entertainment or dining will be available that day. Just that the admission media will allow you into the park between the stated opening and closing of the park.
 

yensidtlaw1969

Well-Known Member
Actually not, The fine print says that all Disney needs to do is to allow you into the park, There is no guarantee that ANY attractions, entertainment or dining will be available that day. Just that the admission media will allow you into the park between the stated opening and closing of the park.
Yep . . . and when people stop coming because they're being directed toward the Fine Print instead of towards a solution that respects their interests as guests laying out potentially thousands of dollars for a trip, Disney's gonna have to find a way to rest easy knowing the Fine Print had their back.

. . . But being that this company built its reputation on things like giving guests another balloon when one flew away or a new ice cream when one fell on the ground, even though it actively lost them money, they seem to understand the value of creating a positive guest experience. Losing those couple bucks in the moment is worth the goodwill it buys you with your customer. They'll come back if they feel like they're being taken care of. I don't feel qualified to say what's appropriate to offer to guests in a case like this, but clearly there were a lot of unhappy campers and it makes business sense to try to fix that.

As far as I'm concerned, it's totally clear that the unannounced closure of Pandora's two attractions for the entire day is an exceptional circumstance. These are the highest profile attractions in the both the Park and the Resort at the moment, and it's absolutely true that people are booking trips to see the big new thing at Disney World. If Disney wants to build goodwill with the guests who woke up that morning thinking they had paid for a shot to get on those rides that day, then it makes sense to offer them *something* in return for the trouble they ran into on their totally expensive vacations.
 
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ParksAndPixels

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
Yes
I can tell you for certain that while of course they don’t want to give out passes or comps etc, that other parks include these things into a budgeted line item every year. It’s “part of doing business” sometimes. Managment would rather make the guests happy and know they’re likely to come back, than tell people” too bad”, knowing they may loose a customer for an extended period. From business perspective existing customers are cheaper than looking for ways to lure new ones.
 

tonymu

Premium Member
Interesting takes on this issue.

  1. Blaming FP+ though is, quite frankly, dumb. Knowing you are going to Animal Kingdom 60 days out is no different than knowing you're going to be there the day of. You are there, the land is down. How you got there is immaterial.
I would disagree. Before they days of any fastpass you could have left Animal Kingdom and gone to the Magic Kingdom for the rest of the day because there was nothing keeping you there, like other fastpasses. You could have enjoyed the rest of the day at the Magic Kingdom because you could enjoy any and all the attractions you wanted to enjoy. You could have then gone back to Animal Kingdom on another day when everything was operational. You can't do that now because even if you abandon whatever fastpasses you had at Animal Kingdom, you would not have any at the Magic Kingdom and because of fastpass the standby lines are incredibly longer than the lines where before fastpass and you would not be able to do as much.

In the days before fastpass we would spend a day in EPCOT, a day in DisneyMGM Studios, a day in Animal Kingdom, a couple of days in the Magic Kingdom, a day in each water park, and then a couple of days park hopping just hitting our favorite attractions. If the weather was bad or we stayed in the Magic Kingdom until 2am we would adjust our schedule and swap a next day park visit for a late start at a water park or late start and hotel hopping. We often adjusted our schedule on the fly to accommodate unforeseen change in our plans. You can no longer do any of that because you are scheduled to the hilt.

It was so much more fun and casual in those days to enter the park and casually work your way around. If a line was too long you would skip it and come back later when the line was shorter. It was a relaxing, fun casual time with family. Since the first incarnation of fastpass that has all disappeared. In those days to work the system and not get screwed by the non moving standby lines you had to run from one side of the park to the other to get the paper passes and then race back to that attraction when your time came up. At least now you don't have to run back and forth across the park but your day is so structured that it feels like school getting from class to class.

Back in those days I can remember going to Universal Studios in California and hating the experience because the whole day there was spent trying to make a schedule work between riding rides and shows times, since almost everything there was shows, and the scheduled time you got when you entered the park for the lower half tram tour. I was always thankful that Disney was not like that.....
 

ford91exploder

Resident Curmudgeon
I can tell you for certain that while of course they don’t want to give out passes or comps etc, that other parks include these things into a budgeted line item every year. It’s “part of doing business” sometimes. Managment would rather make the guests happy and know they’re likely to come back, than tell people” too bad”, knowing they may loose a customer for an extended period. From business perspective existing customers are cheaper than looking for ways to lure new ones.

The problem with your argument is that Disney is now catering to the 'one and done' guest who will never return
 

ford91exploder

Resident Curmudgeon
Of course Disney is at fault when a ride goes down. They charge exorbitant amounts for a product, and they have a responsibility to deliver that product. What’s more, Disney has gone to absurd lengths, through advanced FP reservations and highly priced park hopper options, to limit guest flexibility. That makes a major ride being down for a whole day a bigger deal then it might otherwise be.

I honestly have no idea why people want to identify with the multi-billion dollar international conglomerate and not the guests.

Because Disney is a religion for some, I also don't understand the worship of a mega-corporation
 

Disone

Well-Known Member
The theme park industry thrives on opening the latest and greatest new attraction. If you have advertised your new attraction as open, and it's not, then some form of compensation should be given. It is after all what your marketing people to come to to visit your theme park to see in the first place. If they're not able to see it then it can definitely feel like bait and switch. It's not because the intent was not there.

Me personally, I probably would not stand in that guest relations line, but I would write a letter. And I would expect something.
Well, not in public. Remember, a broken attraction needs no CMs manning it, just one or two out front to turn people away.
Just stop... That is not how that works. They do not get to good home so they are still paid. They are kept for when the issue is resolved, which is unknown, the attraction can be quickly returned to service.
 

bluetiedye

Active Member
I’d be so mad if I was only there for a couple days and it was closed the whole time. I’d imagine some people probably planned their trips because of Pandora opening.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
I can tell you for certain that while of course they don’t want to give out passes or comps etc, that other parks include these things into a budgeted line item every year. It’s “part of doing business” sometimes. Managment would rather make the guests happy and know they’re likely to come back, than tell people” too bad”, knowing they may loose a customer for an extended period. From business perspective existing customers are cheaper than looking for ways to lure new ones.
I think it needs to be pointed out that this discussion of compensation did not start because of how Disney was handling the situation but how guests were handling the situations. As far as I can tell, by all accounts Disney was essentially handing out admission and I’m not really sure what would have been much better.
 

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