Pandora will create 1,500 jobs (video)

egg

Well-Known Member
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How about an increase in how much they get paid.

People often get paid close to minimum wage for straightforward jobs. Now, I don't mean to suggest that these jobs aren't important, or that a better employee can't do a better job.
But when you ring up a customer's clothing at Kohls, you don't need to know words in Na'vi language, or be the heart of a ride (Jungle Cruise), or for heavens sake, be a character! There are lot of requirements and standards on these fine individuals who do not get paid a fine amount.

So more jobs are great. But higher wages are deserved.
 

Jones14

Well-Known Member
How about an increase in how much they get paid.

People often get paid close to minimum wage for straightforward jobs. Now, I don't mean to suggest that these jobs aren't important, or that a better employee can't do a better job.
But when you ring up a customer's clothing at Kohls, you don't need to know words in Na'vi language, or be the heart of a ride (Jungle Cruise), or for heavens sake, be a character! There are lot of requirements and standards on these fine individuals who do not get paid a fine amount.

So more jobs are great. But higher wages are deserved.
Definitely agree. Rent is very high in the Orlando area, and while that's not their fault, it is disheartening to see a lot of front-of-the-line CM's struggling to make ends meet with a 40-hour workweek.
 

EdC

Well-Known Member
Just of interest what is high rents? Let's say a 2 bedroom condo or a 3 bedroom condo.
Apartment Finder seems to say $700+ for a 2-bedroom, $800+ for a 3-bedroom. Those are the cheapest and only goes up from there. That's what I paid for an apartment almost 10 years ago in the midwest. Doesn't seem so bad?
 

CaptainAmerica

Premium Member
Apartment Finder seems to say $700+ for a 2-bedroom, $800+ for a 3-bedroom. Those are the cheapest and only goes up from there. That's what I paid for an apartment almost 10 years ago in the midwest. Doesn't seem so bad?
The cycle goes something like this:

Disney's biggest customer base is middle- to upper-middle class families. Thus, middle- and upper-middle class kids are the ones who are the biggest fans of the Disney Parks. Thus, young adults from middle- and upper-middle class families are the ones moving to Orlando to work for the Mouse. But these people are used to middle- and upper-middle class lifestyles but they have entry-level or working-class skills. Thus, their wages don't support their lifestyle because their lifestyle is based on their parents' income, not their own. So the WDW cast members complain that they're underpaid even though most of them aren't doing anything more difficult than what you'd do at McDonald's or Burger King.

How about an increase in how much they get paid.

People often get paid close to minimum wage for straightforward jobs. Now, I don't mean to suggest that these jobs aren't important, or that a better employee can't do a better job.
But when you ring up a customer's clothing at Kohls, you don't need to know words in Na'vi language, or be the heart of a ride (Jungle Cruise), or for heavens sake, be a character! There are lot of requirements and standards on these fine individuals who do not get paid a fine amount.

So more jobs are great. But higher wages are deserved.
You're describing a tiny minority of WDW cast members. The vast majority are not Jungle Cruise skippers of people who speak freaking Na'vi. Most of them sell you t-shirts, just like your hypothetical Kohls worker, or hamburgers, just like a hypothetical McDonald's worker, or clean hotel rooms, just like a hypothetical Hilton worker. There's nothing wrong with these jobs, but the idea that cast members are "special" compared to workers in similar roles at other companies is a fantasy.
 

RSoxNo1

Well-Known Member
The cycle goes something like this:

Disney's biggest customer base is middle- to upper-middle class families. Thus, middle- and upper-middle class kids are the ones who are the biggest fans of the Disney Parks. Thus, young adults from middle- and upper-middle class families are the ones moving to Orlando to work for the Mouse. But these people are used to middle- and upper-middle class lifestyles but they have entry-level or working-class skills. Thus, their wages don't support their lifestyle because their lifestyle is based on their parents' income, not their own. So the WDW cast members complain that they're underpaid even though most of them aren't doing anything more difficult than what you'd do at McDonald's or Burger King.


You're describing a tiny minority of WDW cast members. The vast majority are not Jungle Cruise skippers of people who speak freaking Na'vi. Most of them sell you t-shirts, just like your hypothetical Kohls worker, or hamburgers, just like a hypothetical McDonald's worker, or clean hotel rooms, just like a hypothetical Hilton worker. There's nothing wrong with these jobs, but the idea that cast members are "special" compared to workers in similar roles at other companies is a fantasy.
So what you're saying is that they want to have their Pixie Dust and eat it too?
 

rob0519

Well-Known Member
This isn't just a case of middle class kids wanting to live a middle class life on an entry level income. Rents and housing prices in many metro areas exceed what an individual can afford. It's the result of many things, demand, taxes, insurance, landlords just pushing to get as much money as possible. It really has nothing to do with Disney. For example, my nephew lives in Wisconsin and was being recruited by Apple. He is in his early 30s, has an Engineering Degree, a wife and two kids and a modest house. They flew him out, all the interviews went well and an offer was made. After a week of looking for housing, he finally told them the salary offered was not enough to live within 50 miles of their HQ and he asked them if they could do better. The response was basically, Apple doesn't feel they are responsible for the price of housing in Northern California, take the job or don't. So he didn't take it. It's not just entry level employees at Disney that are experiencing outrageous housing costs.
 

Goingdown13

Active Member
Just of interest what is high rents? Let's say a 2 bedroom condo or a 3 bedroom condo.

I live in a 2 bedroom 2 bathroom apartment in Orlando and it is about to go up to $1400 a month. If you go out to areas south or west of Disney that gets cheaper. Typically a 2 bedroom 2 bathroom will be around $1000 a month at the cheapest if you don't want to worry about your car being left on blocks 100% of the time.
 

Goingdown13

Active Member
The cycle goes something like this:

Disney's biggest customer base is middle- to upper-middle class families. Thus, middle- and upper-middle class kids are the ones who are the biggest fans of the Disney Parks. Thus, young adults from middle- and upper-middle class families are the ones moving to Orlando to work for the Mouse. But these people are used to middle- and upper-middle class lifestyles but they have entry-level or working-class skills. Thus, their wages don't support their lifestyle because their lifestyle is based on their parents' income, not their own. So the WDW cast members complain that they're underpaid even though most of them aren't doing anything more difficult than what you'd do at McDonald's or Burger King.


You're describing a tiny minority of WDW cast members. The vast majority are not Jungle Cruise skippers of people who speak freaking Na'vi. Most of them sell you t-shirts, just like your hypothetical Kohls worker, or hamburgers, just like a hypothetical McDonald's worker, or clean hotel rooms, just like a hypothetical Hilton worker. There's nothing wrong with these jobs, but the idea that cast members are "special" compared to workers in similar roles at other companies is a fantasy.

Except your local McDonalds franchise isn't one of the busiest places in the world, in one of the hottest parts of the United States, with some of the most demanding customers.
 

CaptainAmerica

Premium Member
Except your local McDonalds franchise isn't one of the busiest places in the world, in one of the hottest parts of the United States, with some of the most demanding customers.
Literally none of what you said is relevant or even true.

Yeah, Disney World is busier than a McDonald's so what? Disney World has 60,000 employees, a McDonald's has maybe 60. You're acting like some random line cook is personally serving the entire 60,000 himself. Weather is doubly irrelevant because 1) the vast majority of food service employees work indoors and 2) there are lots of people who work for lots of different companies that are in climates just as harsh as Orlando. And your comment on customers is just ignorant and proof that you've never worked in the type of job we're talking about. Customers are jerks everywhere.
 

Goingdown13

Active Member
Literally none of what you said is relevant or even true.

Yeah, Disney World is busier than a McDonald's so what? Disney World has 60,000 employees, a McDonald's has maybe 60. You're acting like some random line cook is personally serving the entire 60,000 himself. Weather is doubly irrelevant because 1) the vast majority of food service employees work indoors and 2) there are lots of people who work for lots of different companies that are in climates just as harsh as Orlando. And your comment on customers is just ignorant and proof that you've never worked in the type of job we're talking about. Customers are jerks everywhere.

Lots of attractions work outdoors or have outdoor positions that require them to be outside for quite some time through out the day. Lets not forget the foods and merchandise people who work a the stands and spend a majority of their day outside. Almost every single restaurant on property is going to serve way more people than your normal McDonalds, so volume of what they're making is vastly different.

People also have way higher standards at Walt Disney World than they do when they visit a McDonalds. If they get my order wrong, I usually scrape off the onions and deal with it. When stuff goes wrong at Disney World people get very angry very quickly. Cast Members get yelled at over some of the most trivial things. Next time you're there stand outside by the FastPass cast member and listen to how many times they get yelled out in half an hour.

All of this isn't to say that the job is rocket science, because it isn't, but to say that it's no different than any low level job is also wrong. There is a lot expected from a trip to Walt Disney World that is riding on those cast members shoulders. A living wage isn't too much to ask for for that.

Now onto the number of cast members. Most of them DO work in the parks because a vast number of them are Part Time. The majority of that 60,000 is in park cast members making $10 an hour.

Now onto pay. A living wage should be expected from ANY job. Obviously want the service they provide, or you wouldn't be on the boards here, but don't think they should have decent pay because it isn't a high skill job.
 

CaptainAmerica

Premium Member
Lots of attractions work outdoors or have outdoor positions that require them to be outside for quite some time through out the day. Lets not forget the foods and merchandise people who work a the stands and spend a majority of their day outside. Almost every single restaurant on property is going to serve way more people than your normal McDonalds, so volume of what they're making is vastly different.

People also have way higher standards at Walt Disney World than they do when they visit a McDonalds. If they get my order wrong, I usually scrape off the onions and deal with it. When stuff goes wrong at Disney World people get very angry very quickly. Cast Members get yelled at over some of the most trivial things. Next time you're there stand outside by the FastPass cast member and listen to how many times they get yelled out in half an hour.

All of this isn't to say that the job is rocket science, because it isn't, but to say that it's no different than any low level job is also wrong. There is a lot expected from a trip to Walt Disney World that is riding on those cast members shoulders. A living wage isn't too much to ask for for that.

Now onto the number of cast members. Most of them DO work in the parks because a vast number of them are Part Time. The majority of that 60,000 is in park cast members making $10 an hour.

Now onto pay. A living wage should be expected from ANY job. Obviously want the service they provide, or you wouldn't be on the boards here, but don't think they should have decent pay because it isn't a high skill job.
The idea of a "living wage" is based on economic illiteracy. It changes the calculus of automation and ensures that young and low-skilled people are literally unemployable. Pass a "living" minimum wage and millions of people would lose their jobs within a year.
 

Goingdown13

Active Member
The idea of a "living wage" is based on economic illiteracy. It changes the calculus of automation and ensures that young and low-skilled people are literally unemployable. Pass a "living" minimum wage and millions of people would lose their jobs within a year.

A "living wage" varies based on your location and should be accounted for accordingly. The living wage in Southern California is pretty different than what would be required in Mississippi.

The idea that a "living wage" being a term of financial illiteracy is absurd. Millions wouldn't lose their jobs. The labor still has to be done by someone. Because I know the main hit back is "Well those jobs would become automated" all of those jobs that can be automated will become automated regardless of pay. The second automation becomes cheaper than labor it will be done, so it is simply a matter of time.
 

Goingdown13

Active Member
The idea of a "living wage" is based on economic illiteracy. It changes the calculus of automation and ensures that young and low-skilled people are literally unemployable. Pass a "living" minimum wage and millions of people would lose their jobs within a year.

Again to put it simply, if you don't appreciate the work they do and think that they should afford to put food on the table, don't even waste your time going. That goes for any service industry job. You're just one less person who thinks they are better than them because you aren't making $10 an hour.
 

CaptainAmerica

Premium Member
Again to put it simply, if you don't appreciate the work they do and think that they should afford to put food on the table, don't even waste your time going. That goes for any service industry job. You're just one less person who thinks they are better than them because you aren't making $10 an hour.
It's entry-level work. Entry-level work gets you entry-level pay. Eventually, you develop skills and move up. Not every job can be a career job.
 

Goingdown13

Active Member
As I always say if Disney wasn't paying enough then they wouldn't have enough people to run the place. I know of no worker shortage at Disney or Universal?

Locally we have a worker shortage and some people (your liberal types) think the local government should get into the housing business for the low paid workers. I say the employers have to pay more or they can go out of business and a few have closed their doors. If the government gets involved it is simply subsidizing the employers so they don't have to pay. In the end the tax payers will end up with the bill. In the case of any government housing it always turns to crap down the road.

It will all balance out and has been for the last 30 years where I am. Housing gets more expensive, workers move to whoever is paying more, businesses fail or they raise their pay scale and usually prices. Locally what seems to happen is the employees start figuring out ways to make some extra money at their employers expense. Out of town people really don't do well in business here because they usually get robbed blind if they try to pay minimum wage.

Have to say that all this doesn't work in an area where jobs are leaving.

Entry level is entry level or it's just a unskilled job. I think the minimum wage across the US should go up to maybe $10-$12. If you don't like that wage you need to get some skills or get a hard job that pays more. $10 an hour will get you the basics.


Never did I say that the government should get involved with subsidizing and $10 will not get you the basics in Orlando. Simple as that.

If everyone has the skills for skilled jobs, who will do the unskilled jobs? Not everyone is capable of the same things.
 

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