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no wieght!!!

mkt

Maleante Izquierdozo
Premium Member
when going from 2.5 G's pulling you away from your seat to 0, you will experience the sensation of weightlessness. Try this...

drive really fast down an empty road... slam on your brakes. When you shoot forward, it's the same as M:S, but in a diffferent direction
 

Mikejakester

Active Member
uhm I'm not sure about that mkt

That isn't weightlessness

So don't drive really fast down the road dboy. I haven't been on Mission Space So I would not know what sensation you guys are talking about. But the only way to obtain weightlessness here on earth would be to ride in a large parable, you would feel 0 G going down the hill. You can feel 0 G's in Hollywood tower of Terror during the drop ( you can hold any object on your palm and you can see it float in front of you during the fall, or just watch some girls long hair stand up), and on Superman the escape in Magic Mountain. Also in a lot of roller coasters, Usually down hills, That's what gives you that tingly feeling in your stomach.

Accelerating really fast( driving really fast) will just add positive or negative G's . Positive when you accelerate, pushing your body into the seat, and negative when you start to slow down. either way your never in weightlessness because there is a "constant" force of (your weigh) X ( 9.81 m/s(Acceleratino of Gravity)) Downward. The only way to archive weightlessness is in some kind of free fall.
 

mkt

Maleante Izquierdozo
Premium Member
i just did some more research into this... when the centrifuge is accelerating, the G's your body is experiencing are rising... as it decelerates, but continues spinning, the G's decrease, thus creating the sensation of weightlessness (while not actually being weightless)
 

stepharoni

New Member
I haven't done M:S, but I can explain ToT. When you feel like you're floating, it's because the elevator is going down faster than the acceleration of gravity, while your body only falls at the rate of gravity. If both were freefalling, then you'd stay on the seat. If the elevator goes down a little faster, then your knees touch the bar.

The same idea applies to horizontal travel. If your body is travelling at a certain rate, then the speed of the vehicle you're in will determine how that speed is perceived. That speed right in between when you feel the seat against your back and when you feel the seatbelt is when you feel weightless. I love how they're smart enough to figure that out just so we can have fun.
 

Mikejakester

Active Member
thus creating the sensation of weightlessness (while not actually being weightless)

Now that I belive. that makes sense now.
:D
That speed right in between when you feel the seat against your back and when you feel the seatbelt is when you feel weightless.

The only difference is that the free fall would be actual weighlessness and the horizonal is just a sensation.


So what I get from this is that MS plays with inertia and momentum to create a sensation of weithlessness. What I am imagining is that MS exposes you to high G's and all of the sudden take them off or gradually lowers them giving a sensation of lighness, It's like putting 500 pounds on your back for 5 min. then taking them off. You would feel light as a feather.


Can't wait to ride it.
Altho I think there is still no substitude for a good 5 second freefall. :dazzle:
 

ISTCrew20

Well-Known Member
Well actually.....


Being at a level of 0 G's is just like your under water, nothing is pulling you down...Thats how astronoughts (sp?) train for 0 G...by going under water.

Now, when you get that feeling in your stomach, such as on Tower, or SPAM, thats negitive G's......So, even though it doesnt give you that feeling on MS, it was never supposed to.

Now, they could make major Negitive G's on the ride if they just flipped the pods around, which I orginally thought is how it would work. Im still trying to figure out, how when your tilted on your back, your pushed into your seat instead of out of it...

btw, Rob, have you ever seen the fuge spin?...Its crazy. Stand by the exit and ask them if you could peek thru the crack of the exit doors...You would never have guessed it spun so fast
 

The_CEO

Well-Known Member
I am pretty sure the Fuge tilts a bit to make it feel more so, considering from sources stating it doesnt stop; it would tilt forward creating an equal force.
 

ISTCrew20

Well-Known Member
Originally posted by The_CEO
I am pretty sure the Fuge tilts a bit to make it feel more so, considering from sources stating it doesnt stop; it would tilt forward creating an equal force.

It never does stop I dont believe. There are portions, where it spins extremely slow, like, you could walk around the entire fuge, before a pod makes it around...

and Justin, dont you be takin Mya away from me now, her love it like wo...lol:D
 

collectspace

New Member
Originally posted by ISTCrew20
Being at a level of 0 G's is just like your under water, nothing is pulling you down...Thats how astronoughts (sp?) train for 0 G...by going under water.

Not exactly. Simply submerging yourself will not account for the pull of gravity. Astronauts train underwater by achieving neutral buoyancy -- an equal tendency to float as there is to sink. They do so by adding weights to their body.

Once you are neutrally buoyant, you can experience to some degree the effects of weightlessness (i.e. every action has an equal and opposite reaction) but you still feel the weight of the suit you are wearing and tools that you are holding will still fall if dropped.

As a result, neutral buoyancy is only used to train astronauts who are preparing for spacewalks. Microgravity training is instead accomplished using a parabolic flight.

Getting back on topic, a while back I saw a sketch of the layout of M:S that showed the individual fuges each operating on the arms of a larger, all encompassing fuge (in other words, while a rider was spinning inside an individual fuge, that fuge was spinning on a larger one. The sketch was not official, so can anyone confirm if that second, "parent" fuge exists? If so, it might be able to explain how they achieve the sensation of weightlessness without spinning down the individual fuges.
 

ISTCrew20

Well-Known Member
Originally posted by collectspace
Not exactly. Simply submerging yourself will not account for the pull of gravity. Astronauts train underwater by achieving neutral buoyancy -- an equal tendency to float as there is to sink. They do so by adding weights to their body.

Once you are neutrally buoyant, you can experience to some degree the effects of weightlessness (i.e. every action has an equal and opposite reaction) but you still feel the weight of the suit you are wearing and tools that you are holding will still fall if dropped.

As a result, neutral buoyancy is only used to train astronauts who are preparing for spacewalks. Microgravity training is instead accomplished using a parabolic flight.

Getting back on topic, a while back I saw a sketch of the layout of M:S that showed the individual fuges each operating on the arms of a larger, all encompassing fuge (in other words, while a rider was spinning inside an individual fuge, that fuge was spinning on a larger one. The sketch was not official, so can anyone confirm if that second, "parent" fuge exists? If so, it might be able to explain how they achieve the sensation of weightlessness without spinning down the individual fuges.



Thanks for explaining that, thats real cool....About your fuge question...There are 10 pods, the fuge arm, is connected to the top of the pod, by a brace that goes around the pod for tilting. (So it looks almost like a spider, with little pod feet)...I think I know what you mean by a second one, but, I dont think there is one, just the one your sitting in. And Im taking that from when I saw it spin while people were on the ride, but, I make mistakes, and Im not sure
 

collectspace

New Member
Originally posted by ISTCrew20
About your fuge question...There are 10 pods, the fuge arm, is connected to the top of the pod, by a brace that goes around the pod for tilting. (So it looks almost like a spider, with little pod feet)...I think I know what you mean by a second one, but, I dont think there is one, just the one your sitting in. And Im taking that from when I saw it spin while people were on the ride, but, I make mistakes, and Im not sure

If I may inquire, how were you able to see the ride in motion? When I go there this weekend, I'd really enjoy the opportunity to snap off a few shots of the ride in motion.
 

ISTCrew20

Well-Known Member
Originally posted by collectspace
If I may inquire, how were you able to see the ride in motion? When I go there this weekend, I'd really enjoy the opportunity to snap off a few shots of the ride in motion.


If you get the numbers 8 or 9, your right by the exit doors, ask a cm to go peek thru the doors, you can see it spin:D
 

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