• Welcome to the WDWMAGIC.COM Forums!
    Please take a look around, and feel free to sign up and join the community.You can use your Twitter or Facebook account to sign up, or register directly.

News New Gondola Transportation - Disney Skyliner - Every Possible What If ....? Has Been Discussed.

PJBuckeye

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
Yes
So, when are they going to start changing over Pop to more AoA? Any guesses on new themes... my guess: Frozen, Zootopia, Monsters, Inc. Inside Out
 

MisterPenguin

🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧Fully Pfizered!🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧
Premium Member
Did I miss a rumor on this?

Yeah, there's a rumor, but not from any of our noted insiders, that POP is going to be rethemed to be part of AoA so that they can start charging AoA prices there.

Never mind that the reason for the AoA prices is that they're mostly family suites. And never mind the cost of changing out all those giant props.

Most likely the current refurp of POP rooms is the source of this rumor. Which is also a reason why this rumor is false. If they were going to retheme POP, they wouldn't be refurbing the rooms with the same old POP theme.
 

Biff215

Well-Known Member
Yeah, there's a rumor, but not from any of our noted insiders, that POP is going to be rethemed to be part of AoA so that they can start charging AoA prices there.

Never mind that the reason for the AoA prices is that they're mostly family suites. And never mind the cost of changing out all those giant props.

Most likely the current refurp of POP rooms is the source of this rumor. Which is also a reason why this rumor is false. If they were going to retheme POP, they wouldn't be refurbing the rooms with the same old POP theme.
I agree this is likely false too, but AoA charges higher prices on the standard rooms as well, possibly since they are in limited supply. Retheming POP to other Disney/Pixar movies would no doubt be a draw, but likely not worth the investment and downtime.
 

TiggerDad

Well-Known Member
I think it's odd that the gondola from CBR to Epcot will go over Buena Vista and then just hug the side of the road so you'll be looking at traffic down below.
That also leaves almost the entire plot behind the USA pavilion free. I think @danlb_2000 said it would be used as construction staging, but what if something else is going there? Probably more likely that they just wanted some separation between gondola line and backstage EPCOT, but we will see.
 

roj2323

Well-Known Member
My question about going over water is how that impacts safety features, i.e. rescues in the case where a vehicle (or vehicles) are "stuck".
You disengage the motor and engage a manual crank to bring people into the station? The reality is with a loop system such as the gondola system the only major breakdowns would be from major deferred maintenance or tampering (bad people doing bad things). In either case provided the cable is intact the system can be operated manually or worst case scenario the cable can be dragged by a rope attached to a truck to move the system somewhere else along the line that is over land. Either way the people wouldn't be trapped for any significant length of time no different than the monorail.
 

Lift Blog

Well-Known Member
You disengage the motor and engage a manual crank to bring people into the station? The reality is with a loop system such as the gondola system the only major breakdowns would be from major deferred maintenance or tampering (bad people doing bad things). In either case provided the cable is intact the system can be operated manually or worst case scenario the cable can be dragged by a rope attached to a truck to move the system somewhere else along the line that is over land. Either way the people wouldn't be trapped for any significant length of time no different than the monorail.

Sort of. A typical lift system has three movers - the primary electric motor, a large diesel standby drive and a smaller diesel evacuation drive - in addition to three sets of brakes. The evacuation drive bypasses some of the safery systems that could be preventing the lift from moving and is designed only to offload passengers at slow speed under careful supervision. There are still a few possible but unlikely failures that could necessitate a rope evacuation: a major deropement, bad bullwheel bearings or gearbox failure. Disney could opt for additional redundancies including DirectDrive (no gearbox) to further minimize the already unlikely scenario of an evacuation.
 

creathir

Premium Member
Sort of. A typical lift system has three movers - the primary electric motor, a large diesel standby drive and a smaller diesel evacuation drive - in addition to three sets of brakes. The evacuation drive bypasses some of the safery systems that could be preventing the lift from moving and is designed only to offload passengers at slow speed under careful supervision. There are still a few possible but unlikely failures that could necessitate a rope evacuation: a major deropement, bad bullwheel bearings or gearbox failure. Disney could opt for additional redundancies including DirectDrive (no gearbox) to further minimize the already unlikely scenario of an evacuation.

I'm assuming something like Peak to Peak has similar safety systems in place.

Is there ever a possibility for Peak To Peak to undergo a rope evacuation, and if so how on earth would that be accomplished if the gondola was in the middle of the span?
 

Lift Blog

Well-Known Member
I'm assuming something like Peak to Peak has similar safety systems in place.

Is there ever a possibility for Peak To Peak to undergo a rope evacuation, and if so how on earth would that be accomplished if the gondola was in the middle of the span?
Peak 2 Peak has a non-standard system of rescue vehicles that winch themselves down and back up that big span on top of the existing track cables and can pull the cabins back to towers 2 and 3.

This much simpler setup is what most ski areas use to evacuate gondolas with trained personnel... http://www.cascade-rescue.com/products/cascade-rescue-cable-glider.html

I imagine many locations at WDW could be accessed by ladder truck and helicopter is also an option. Again, the need for any of these methods is very small but whatever plan is chosen will be practiced regularly.
 
Last edited:

creathir

Premium Member
Peak 2 Peak has a non-standard system of rescue cars that winch themselves down and back up that big span on top of the existing track cables and dock alongside the cabins.

This much simpler setup is what most ski areas use to evacuate gondolas... http://www.cascade-rescue.com/products/cascade-rescue-cable-glider.html

I imagine many locations at WDW could be accessed by ladder truck and helicopter is also an option. Again, the need for any of these methods is very small but whatever plan is chosen will be practiced regularly.

Oh of course, and WDW doesn't have any spans which will be anywhere near the height AGL that Peak 2 Peak does.

Really these appear to be extremely safe transportation systems which have a long record of reliability and lack of incidents to back that up.

I'm assuming the automation components make modern systems infinitely safer than systems such as the original Skyway at the Magic Kingdom.
 

Lift Blog

Well-Known Member
Oh of course, and WDW doesn't have any spans which will be anywhere near the height AGL that Peak 2 Peak does.

Really these appear to be extremely safe transportation systems which have a long record of reliability and lack of incidents to back that up.

I'm assuming the automation components make modern systems infinitely safer than systems such as the original Skyway at the Magic Kingdom.

The brand new Doppelmayr gondola where I work is extremely impressive and I know Leitner-Poma versions are too. There are touchscreens with literally pages and pages of possible faults. Each terminal has dozens of switches that monitor rope and bullwheel positions. An anti-collision system monitors cabin spacing by zones. Every grip is checked for proper clamping force on every revolution. Each time cabin doors close, they are verified by multiple sensors. Rope position and winds are monitored on the towers. Gearbox and motor temperatures are constantly checked. When the machine detects something it doesn't like, it stops and tells you the fault(s) so you can put eyes on and quickly get moving again.
 
Last edited:

creathir

Premium Member
The brand new Doppelmayr gondola where I work is extremely impressive and I know Leitner-Poma versions are too. There are touchscreens with literally pages and pages of possible faults. Each terminal has dozens of switches that monitor rope and bullwheel positions. Every grip is checked for proper clamping force on every revolution. Each time cabin doors close, they are checked by multiple sensors. Rope position and winds are monitored on the towers. When the machine detects something it doesn't like, it stops and tells you so you can put eyes on and quickly get moving again.
Amazing technology.
 

danlb_2000

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
That also leaves almost the entire plot behind the USA pavilion free. I think @danlb_2000 said it would be used as construction staging, but what if something else is going there? Probably more likely that they just wanted some separation between gondola line and backstage EPCOT, but we will see.

It will be construction staging for now, probably for the gondola project, but it could be used for something else in the future.
 

Register on WDWMAGIC. This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.

Top Bottom