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News New Gondola Transportation - Disney Skyliner - Every Possible What If ....? Has Been Discussed.

SLUSHIE

Well-Known Member
The way the windows open are different to how they usually are, which is possibly to help prevent water from entering.

Usually the windows open in, so that they can be opened and closed from the inside, they also usually pivot on the bottom not the top. These pivot on the top and open out, but possibly cannot be opened from the inside. I've never really experienced much water getting inside with the normal windows but I've also never really ridden one in hard rain.
 

joelkfla

Well-Known Member
Is the wire two separate loops on the two ends of the DRR station? One from epcot and one from CB.

If so they could have designed the station with an overflow track for extra cabins, similar to how the handicap cabins will be handled where they drop off the main line.
It wouldn't matter whether it's a continuous cable or two separate ones; the cabins come off the cable while passing through the station regardless. If they didn't, they wouldn't be able to slow down for loading.
 

Disneyfanman

Well-Known Member
I'm sure that this system is a huge technology upgrade to the old system that Disney and other parks used to have, but it sure looks like it works generally the same way. The cabin unclamps from the cable in the station and travels on a circuit frame for loading and unloading. Then the cabin is rolled into the queue where it waits to roll forward and reattach to the cable for travel. I used to really enjoy the ride in any park that I visited. I vividly remember going through the Matterhorn mountain in DL and looking down at the track and cars rolling through. For me the only scary moment was when the cabin "dropped" onto the cable and clamped on. I was always certain that it was going to miss and fall to the ground.

One difference here is that the start and finish seem to be much closer to the ground. At DL and WDW, when they ran the system in the parks, the cabin emerged from the station 20 or 30 off the ground at the beginning of the journey (the stations were on the 2nd story platform).

I haven't been on a system like this for 15 years. I'm pretty excited about it!
 

joelkfla

Well-Known Member
I'm sure that this system is a huge technology upgrade to the old system that Disney and other parks used to have, but it sure looks like it works generally the same way. The cabin unclamps from the cable in the station and travels on a circuit frame for loading and unloading. Then the cabin is rolled into the queue where it waits to roll forward and reattach to the cable for travel. I used to really enjoy the ride in any park that I visited. I vividly remember going through the Matterhorn mountain in DL and looking down at the track and cars rolling through. For me the only scary moment was when the cabin "dropped" onto the cable and clamped on. I was always certain that it was going to miss and fall to the ground.

One difference here is that the start and finish seem to be much closer to the ground. At DL and WDW, when they ran the system in the parks, the cabin emerged from the station 20 or 30 off the ground at the beginning of the journey (the stations were on the 2nd story platform).

I haven't been on a system like this for 15 years. I'm pretty excited about it!
The major difference is that cabins don't normally stop for unloading and loading; they move continuously through the stations at a fraction of walking speed and accelerate smoothly to cable speed. And they are pushed through the stations by rotating tires, not by cm's.
 

MansionButler84

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
I think there are a small number of people, not necessarily on this board, that honestly believe that no AC is a safety issue, but I think most the doubters just feel it would be too uncomfortable to ride.
To be fair, some would view EVERY outdoor ride as uncomfortable May through September. SSE manages to be uncomfortable 365 days of the year. I was shocked to be sweating past cave men in February.
 

GeneralKnowledge

Well-Known Member
I know Disney can handle wet surfaces, but my thing was more related to the type of services inside the cabins, and whether or not the vents are designed to avoid the rain.

Questions like this always get me. If the engineers at Doppelmayr aren’t smart enough to design the cabins of their outdoor transportation system while the considering the impact of rainfall, that doesn’t bode well for their ability to design the rest of the complex components of the system.
 

Bender123

Well-Known Member
Questions like this always get me. If the engineers at Doppelmayr aren’t smart enough to design the cabins of their outdoor transportation system while the considering the impact of rainfall, that doesn’t bode well for their ability to design the rest of the complex components of the system.

This entire thread consists of people who act as if this is some new technology...They run them in London, so Im sure they have considered rain in the design.
 

danlb_2000

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Questions like this always get me. If the engineers at Doppelmayr aren’t smart enough to design the cabins of their outdoor transportation system while the considering the impact of rainfall, that doesn’t bode well for their ability to design the rest of the complex components of the system.

Yeah, that would be like Disney designing a whole new land and not considering the need for shade. ;)
 

Doug Means

Well-Known Member
Yeah, that would be like Disney designing a whole new land and not considering the need for shade. ;)
I'm sure they always consider the needs of shade! But then what they do about it, well they have to weight the cost of everything. if you want shade there's probably an up charge
 

nace888

Well-Known Member
The type of services inside the cabins ????? Hmmm, I think you may have your expectations set a little high! ;)
Meant surfaces, hate autocorrect...
Questions like this always get me. If the engineers at Doppelmayr aren’t smart enough to design the cabins of their outdoor transportation system while the considering the impact of rainfall, that doesn’t bode well for their ability to design the rest of the complex components of the system.
It's not anything like I'm questioning their abilities, it was more of a curiosity question.
This entire thread consists of people who act as if this is some new technology...They run them in London, so Im sure they have considered rain in the design.
In my defense, who is the random question that I didn't completely think through at the time because I've been so tired.
I think some people forget that these systems also work in snow and sleet on the sides of mountains. Rain is not an issue.
As mentioned before, random question, didn't think about it because I've been so tired. I always forget about the other systems.
 

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