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Millennium Falcon: Smuggler's Run - Ride/Queue Details and Discussion

Texas84

Premium Member
My second trip to Galaxy's Edge and got to see it at night. It's much better in the dark with all the lighting. My crew this time managed to get the second container and they thought I was just being kind when I told them that was good. That's still what I like best about this ride, the crew interactions. We had two experienced engineers and first time pilots and gunners. No one can get that braking right but our new pilots were great. I'm actually enjoying the engineer role.
 

surfsupdon

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
Never seen a Star Wars movie, and don’t often pop into the Star Wars threads bc they really are of no interest to me. Having said that, I rode twice over WineDineHalf weekend:

First time we had children piloting and there was barely any movement. I’m talking it did not even feel like a ride, but more like a video you just sat and watched. It was terrible, an absolute let down. It was confusing for me, and weird bc it felt like a much lesser version of Star Tours. Why build an inferior ride to one that already exists?

Second time we had full size adults piloting. I was told that would be better bc adults can reach all the levers and buttons. That ride had more movement which made it more fun. But I was still confused as to why the screen was in front but I had to keep turning my head to the side to use buttons. I got to a point where I stopped pushing buttons (bc that feels so gimmicky) and just watched the screen. A random in my cabin hollered at me to push my darn buttons and I just pretended to not hear. The ride did have more movement but it still stunk and feels inferior to all rides in that park.

I never really felt like I was on a ride. I felt like I was sitting on a couch, waiting to leave and go do something fun, but first I had to watch my friends finish their video games.
 

Clamman73

Well-Known Member
Only went on it once...
-queue is really good
-Hondo AA part was good
-the placement of people into groups a little discombobulated

-the ride...a little meh. I was gunner and it seemed we had an inexperienced pilot...plenty of bouncing around.

-they should’ve sacrificed the realism of cockpit seating position and made it more tiered so each person behind could see over the other...also make the button panel that you have to press bumped out at a 45 degree angle so you don‘t have to turn your head so much.
 

marni1971

WDW History nut
Premium Member
It certainly is overwhelming the first few times to figure out what's going on. For some, that's fine and fun. For others, it's frustrating.

However, by going on it several times in a row in the the single rider, I was able to understand how all the things come together. In this regard, it has, IMO, re-ridability.

You possibly nailed one of the major flaws of the ride. A guest shouldn’t have to re-ride to understand what’s going on.
 

MisterPenguin

🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧Fully Pfizered!🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧
Premium Member
You possibly nailed one of the major flaws of the ride. A guest shouldn’t have to re-ride to understand what’s going on.

Well... it could be considered a new paradigm of a ride considering its interactivity is based on a computer gaming. Instead of "riding the movie", you're "riding the video game."

And as such, most video games employ the tactic of being too difficult 'to beat' the first try. They entice the player to keep playing until they master it.

I did single rider line multiple times until I was satisfied I knew every detail of the scenario and all the tricks of the engineer to be successful (and make sure my team was never in the negative credits due to ship damage). In that way, it was just like a video game... that I rode as a ride.

If they hand-held you all the way through, it would have been decried as too boring and the gaming aspect too basic.

People still proudly post their Galactic Hero scores they got on Buzz after many many rides/tries.
 

Nunu

Wanderluster
Premium Member
Well... it could be considered a new paradigm of a ride considering its interactivity is based on a computer gaming. Instead of "riding the movie", you're "riding the video game."

And as such, most video games employ the tactic of being too difficult 'to beat' the first try. They entice the player to keep playing until they master it.

I did single rider line multiple times until I was satisfied I knew every detail of the scenario and all the tricks of the engineer to be successful (and make sure my team was never in the negative credits due to ship damage). In that way, it was just like a video game... that I rode as a ride.

If they hand-held you all the way through, it would have been decried as too boring and the gaming aspect too basic.

People still proudly post their Galactic Hero scores they got on Buzz after many many rides/tries.
Buzz takes seconds to figure out. TSMM gives you a practice game. But I’m glad you enjoyed it. Me, I preferred Star Tours. And that surprised me.
I get both your points. I'm still a bit embarrassed about not getting the full scope of MFSR, even after a second ride. Maybe ride it more times like Mister Penguin did, is the answer for me.
Not many will have the opportunity to do so, and that's a problem, imo.

There's where rides like Star Tours and Buzz can be more enjoyable for riders who don't play video games (like me). Some might just want to enjoy a ride without feeling like you have to choose between completing several tasks or appreciating the visuals. I felt a bit guilty for maybe ruining the experience for others.

I'm looking forward to at least one more ride in just a few weeks. I hope I'll do better next time!
 

SplashZander

Well-Known Member
My thoughts on interactive ride elements and its implementation into MFSR:

I personally love TSM.
I am not a fan of Buzz in WDW.
I greatly enjoy Mission Space.
Kali River Rapids
I enjoy MFSR, but I was disappointed.

What is great about each:

TSM

The game is enjoyable, easy to understand, and has a large area for improvement. If you are horrible, it does not worsen the experience. If a mom decides to record her 4-year-old the whole ride the experience is ruined for no one but the mom. There is a definite winning to Toy Story Mania, get a higher score than the individual sitting next to you or in another vehicle and you win. The competition can continue on rides as you watch your score improve with every ride. My personal highest is 404k, I would ride on repeat for well over an hour if I could.

Buzz

The game is relatively easy to understand; there are guns and there are bright targets. If you are horrible, it does not worsen the experience. However, there is no "skill" or genuine improvement that can be done. Hit a couple of special targets and *BAM* your score is maxed out. The controls are horrid and there is no labeling on the targets to describe the points which can be won. Rerideabiltiy to me is very poor on Buzz as the level of playing does not change and you cannot admire the surroundings on other dark rides as you are preoccupied with obtaining worthless points.

Mission Space

Not a game, simply a ride that uses meaningless interactive elements to keep you engaged in a forward-facing position with your eyes open and not vomiting. 10/10

Kali River Rapids

The only interactive element is only accessed by not being on the ride and the last handful of times I have ridden the ride it has been missing in action. 1/10 when not working 10/10 when working.

MFSR

The controls are far from innate, which is worsened by the fact Cast-Members are bypassing the preboarding preshow which explains the mechanics (I got it for the first time on my third ride). The ride can easily be detracted from by parents neglecting their assigned duties and filming, little kids, or someone who does not understand the mechanics as they are foreign.

Unlike on TSM the competitive aspect of the game is very minor and can really only be accessed with 6 non-kids. Not every individual receives the same experience which can be argued as a benefit for rideability, but I would actually argue the opposite. If you ride as a pilot the first ride and then ride engineer the experience will be considered largely inferior to the vast majority of individuals.

Additionally, the controls, even if you do know how to use them are very poorly implemented. A joystick for the gunner position would greatly enhance the riding experience.

I, and many others prefer Star Tours over MFSR, it is due to a variety of issues. However, my personal belief is that the interactive elements of MFSR actually detract from the ride experience for the vast majority of riders.
 

RobotWolf

Well-Known Member
I'm still a bit embarrassed about not getting the full scope of MFSR, even after a second ride.

You shouldn't feel at all embarrassed. Disney is a company whose pride is (ostensibly) storytelling. They are failing, at the moment, to be effectively communicating their story and your part in it.

Hopefully, due to its nature, the ride can be refined in the future.
 

Kram Sacul

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
Yes
Never seen a Star Wars movie, and don’t often pop into the Star Wars threads bc they really are of no interest to me. Having said that, I rode twice over WineDineHalf weekend:

First time we had children piloting and there was barely any movement. I’m talking it did not even feel like a ride, but more like a video you just sat and watched. It was terrible, an absolute let down. It was confusing for me, and weird bc it felt like a much lesser version of Star Tours. Why build an inferior ride to one that already exists?

Second time we had full size adults piloting. I was told that would be better bc adults can reach all the levers and buttons. That ride had more movement which made it more fun. But I was still confused as to why the screen was in front but I had to keep turning my head to the side to use buttons. I got to a point where I stopped pushing buttons (bc that feels so gimmicky) and just watched the screen. A random in my cabin hollered at me to push my darn buttons and I just pretended to not hear. The ride did have more movement but it still stunk and feels inferior to all rides in that park.

I never really felt like I was on a ride. I felt like I was sitting on a couch, waiting to leave and go do something fun, but first I had to watch my friends finish their video games.

Whenever I read reviews like this I have to wonder if they built a second version of the Falcon ride that barely moves and really is just a video game being shown in a closet. Totally the opposite of my experiences which were fun and engaging with different kinds of groups. Go figure.
 

nickys

Premium Member
Well... it could be considered a new paradigm of a ride considering its interactivity is based on a computer gaming. Instead of "riding the movie", you're "riding the video game."

And as such, most video games employ the tactic of being too difficult 'to beat' the first try. They entice the player to keep playing until they master it.

I did single rider line multiple times until I was satisfied I knew every detail of the scenario and all the tricks of the engineer to be successful (and make sure my team was never in the negative credits due to ship damage). In that way, it was just like a video game... that I rode as a ride.

If they hand-held you all the way through, it would have been decried as too boring and the gaming aspect too basic.

People still proudly post their Galactic Hero scores they got on Buzz after many many rides/tries.

How did you keep getting the engineer role, I thought the roles were assigned randomly?

The gaming aspect is kinda tricky. Whilst many who ride it will be keen gamers, there are just as many who won’t be. And although they may want to “help fly” the MF - which let’s face it for the casual Star Wars fan is the big attraction of the whole Land - they won’t have a clue what to actually do apart from pretty randomly hit buttons, preferably as they light up. Others will just want to ride in the MF, and won’t care about the “game”.

I think Falcon would benefit from more of a ‘tutorial’ on Batuu. If we had a bit more time to establish what the controls are and what is expected of each role before it becomes life and death, I think it would go over better for most. Currently, it’s a trial by fire.

But a ride shouldn’t need a tutorial. It should be fun even for a first time rider, whether 5 or 70. Whether they understand what’s going on or not (due to age, language, cognitive disabilities, whatever).

I get both your points. I'm still a bit embarrassed about not getting the full scope of MFSR, even after a second ride. Maybe ride it more times like Mister Penguin did, is the answer for me.
Not many will have the opportunity to do so, and that's a problem, imo.

There's where rides like Star Tours and Buzz can be more enjoyable for riders who don't play video games (like me). Some might just want to enjoy a ride without feeling like you have to choose between completing several tasks or appreciating the visuals. I felt a bit guilty for maybe ruining the experience for others.

I'm looking forward to at least one more ride in just a few weeks. I hope I'll do better next time!

Noone should feel guilty after a ride. That’s what seems to be wrong about it. Someone said a fellow rider was shouting to an engineer “do your job”. That isn’t something that should happen on a ride. If your pilot is a 5 year old, or your gunner is someone with cerebral palsy, that’s just tough luck.

Somehow they should have figured out how to make this enjoyable whether everyone is 100% on task or some riders are doing nothing. Maybe by giving personal scores, like on TSMM or Buzz, whilst still having some element of influencing the outcome.
 

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