masks with special needs

Gramma4

New Member
Original Poster
We have a trip planned for Feb 2021 and I am terrified because our grandson has moderate autism and can not keep a mask on..
I am positive I am not the only one with this problem... what are some ideas?
 

Storm

Active Member
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Not a direct solution for the problem you might have but I would assume that by february 2021 things will get better and masks to not be mandatory anymore.
 

ajrwdwgirl

Premium Member
I've read about people practicing with kids at home to get them used to it. Or making it into a game or part of a pretend story. Maybe if he picked out the fabric of his mask in a favorite character that would make it more like his buddy? Maybe something like that would work. I know that my husband and I are going to practice using them more for extended periods of time, besides our grocery runs. But I really hope by February they won't be necessary but that might be too much wishful thinking. Good luck. :)
 

NelleBelle

Well-Known Member
I'd start practicing now and see if he'd work with a reward chart. Set the timer on your phone for short periods of time and let him choose a sticker. Slowly increase the time, making it into a game. Hopefully things are better but if they're not, then he'll be able to wear the mask for periods of time, taking breaks for drinks, etc. Then at WDW, maybe increase the prize "rewards" to Disney-themed prizes you buy ahead or tokens he earns and gets to pick something out. It's how we worked with our severely anxious son about riding anything when he was younger. If nothing else, postpone the trip til masks are no longer required.
 

Queen of the WDW Scene

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
Has he been using one at home?
In NYS its mandated so while we all hate it every age group has to partake so its gotten the kids used to it.
My one niece freaks out if my sister doesn't have her's on when they step out of the car. My other niece cries about having to wear it.
All kids are gonna react differently.
Best way to know if he can manage it is to use it now.
The other option would be to play the wait and see game and don't get too excited about the trip unless Disney loosens mask requirements and then if they haven't by the deadline to cancel comes around then make the decision to cancel or go anyways.
 

davidcyndi

Active Member
My son is 16 non verbal autistic. He loves Pixar cars and toy story characters. We made him masks with those characters on them. He loves them and makes it easier to wear. When we trying just the plain blue surgical masks it’s was like bloody murder trying to get him to wear it. None of this may help but thought I would give you another avenue to try.
 

Storm

Active Member
You can feel free, but when the world is in the middle of a pandemic and your problem is not being able to visit a completely unessential place located in the pandemic's epicenter, I doubt many will be on your side.
Exactly this , this isnt a 1st world problem right now , plus by then I would assume that masks wont be mandatory anymore so this shouldnt be a problem
 

Wendy Pleakley

Well-Known Member
Accommodations do not have to be made if they create a situation that is considered unsafe. Disney's lawyers approved the policy in the first place.

Right. I'm not a lawyer but reasonable accommodation of a disability doesn't mean someone is automatically exempt from all rules.

For example, someone who uses a wheelchair. Queues need to be wheelchair accessible. If a store has a staircase, there must also be a ramp available to enter. However, someone who cannot transfer from their wheelchair cannot ride a roller coaster.
 

davidcyndi

Active Member
All I wish to say further is that I am considering legal action on the matter.
WDW gives us parents with autistic kids and adults so many accommodations it’s wonderful that they do it. To really nit pick like this in the middle of a pandemic is really asking much. If anything it will lesson the things they may do for us in the future. I hope you change your mind and try another date to give you time to work with your child and the mask. Good luck to you.
 

Ricky Spanish

Well-Known Member
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lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
Right. I'm not a lawyer but reasonable accommodation of a disability doesn't mean someone is automatically exempt from all rules.

For example, someone who uses a wheelchair. Queues need to be wheelchair accessible. If a store has a staircase, there must also be a ramp available to enter. However, someone who cannot transfer from their wheelchair cannot ride a roller coaster.
I think a better example would be a few years ago there were some high profile stories of persons with missing limbs being denied access to roller coasters, often one that person had previously ridden. This was the result of persons being ejected from coasters and it has been maintained that access can be denied even if previously allowed for reasons of safety.

WDW gives us parents with autistic kids and adults so many accommodations it’s wonderful that they do it. To really nit pick like this in the middle of a pandemic is really asking much. If anything it will lesson the things they may do for us in the future. I hope you change your mind and try another date to give you time to work with your child and the mask. Good luck to you.
Disney is required by law to provide reasonable accommodations.
 

rob0519

Well-Known Member
Not a direct solution for the problem you might have but I would assume that by february 2021 things will get better and masks to not be mandatory anymore.
Based on this, you're assumption does not look like a good bet. Trish Greenhalgh, a primary-care professor at the University of Oxford, told me people should wear masks in public until “there are no new cases, or very few cases,” a goal that the U.S. is still very far from reaching.
 

Queen of the WDW Scene

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
Based on this, you're assumption does not look like a good bet. Trish Greenhalgh, a primary-care professor at the University of Oxford, told me people should wear masks in public until “there are no new cases, or very few cases,” a goal that the U.S. is still very far from reaching.
I just saw that the head of the CDC says if everyone wore masks for the next 6 weeks we could drive this virus into the ground.
 

Club Cooloholic

Well-Known Member
All I wish to say further is that I am considering legal action on the matter.
It is not discrimination if the rule is in place to protect both the person with the mask issue and the other guests. If a guest happened to be 7ft6 and his height precluded him from riding space mountain, that guest is out of luck. If another person has an allergy to chemicals they use to wipe down attractions, disney is not going to be liable to make sure they have a different cleaner.
There are kids and adults with all kinds of sensory issues that would preclude them from going to a live sporting event because of noise and lights, some arenas have special nights or areas to help accommodate these people, but the arenas are not required to have them.
 
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