Layoffs taking place September 2019

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
Theme parks are seasonal. You'll always need fewer people in the fall than during the summer. It's like FedEx hiring extra workers for the Christmas shopping season each year and then letting them go in January.
These annual layoffs are not of front line operating staff or seasonal employees.
 

Disone

Well-Known Member
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Not sure they can afford to do this. The latest round of college program cast are woefully undertrained this year. It’s like they’ve just been dumped right into the job with no information at all.
What is your source on this? I have not heard of any changes to any of the training programs for any level of WDW cm? is the CP training process for this group are no different then whats been in place for years? If so who or what is the source on that. Just curious as I just don't think this is true. I know too many who work with CP CMs.
 

gustaftp

Well-Known Member
What type of IT roles are these?

I ask, because I am an IT consultant, and the nature of my work is that I am not an employee of the companies I work at. I work on special projects, and a consulting firm places me at different companies in my region. I prefer this sort of arrangement; it keeps the work changing and interesting, and pays me better than if I worked in IT operations at the companies I am placed at.
 

prberk

Well-Known Member
My takeaway is that just like at The DLR they expected a much bigger bump from SWGE than what actually occurred and this is an adjustment to reflect that. Also their projections for the Christmas season may also be off and won’t need to ramp up staffing.

@marni1971 said that Burbank was concerned, let’s just hope their reaction is controlled and they’re not going to go full panic mode like last year.
They should be concerned. The overall impression that they have created is that they are now way overpriced versus, say, a beach vacation, and Star Wars land is a flop and boring. Outside of our fan community I think that about sums it up.
 

homerdance

Well-Known Member
That’s part of what makes them so unusual. Reoccurring layoffs is not something that usually happens when business is good.
Some people call that Pruning the roses. Its easier to layoff poor performers then trying to fire them (not saying this is the case at Disney, but this does happen in other areas of the world)
 

kpilcher

Well-Known Member
Hate to sound dumb, but what is CapEx???
Thanks:)
You'd be dumb to not ask! CapEx is shorthand for Capital Expenditures. That's a fancy Wall St. term for big(ger)-ticket projects. Basically, any new additions or changes to operations above a certain dollar amount: New Buses, More Gondolas, More Minnie Vans -- or yes even a new Ride, Attraction or Planet Far, Far Away. Stuff you already run/maintain is OpEx or Operating Expenses. CapEx is a good thumbnail look at how and where companies are investing in their business.
 

Rodan75

Well-Known Member
Usually it’s fiscal-year-change belt tightening. Poor CMs get screwed over Wall Street concerns. Maybe they can stop having entertainment at Epcot. We will just admire the architecture. Perhaps convince the Jammitors to clean the toilets in between sets. Make Candlelight Processional more literal to cut the electricity bill.
My old company did the same thing every year, they essentially called it 'layoffs' and gave severance, but in reality it was used to clean up workers who were performing below expectations. The public layoffs were more about presenting 'fiscal responsibility' to Wall Street and an excuse to not follow normal performance management steps by lazy managers.
 

nickys

Premium Member
Don't understand this. Disney appears to be very crowded this fall. Just try to book a room at a value resort.
Can't get into DVC either.
Offsite guests account for a far bigger percentage of the parks’ capacity than onsite guests.

DVC is always at 90+% capacity, and we are closing in on “Fall Frenzy” time when it’s at 99% capacity. There are basically two seasons for DVC availability: Oct to marathon weekend in Jan (high season) and the rest of the year. And add in any race weekend to the high season.
 

peter11435

Well-Known Member
Not sure they can afford to do this. The latest round of college program cast are woefully undertrained this year. It’s like they’ve just been dumped right into the job with no information at all.
They receive the same training process as anyone else.
 

tirian

Well-Known Member
Not sure they can afford to do this. The latest round of college program cast are woefully undertrained this year. It’s like they’ve just been dumped right into the job with no information at all.
What is your source on this? I have not heard of any changes to any of the training programs for any level of WDW cm? is the CP training process for this group are no different then whats been in place for years? If so who or what is the source on that. Just curious as I just don't think this is true. I know too many who work with CP CMs.
Over the last few years, the onboarding process (“Traditions”) has been reduced from a week to a few days to one day, and now barely a day. The poor CPs are often scheduled together with hardly any experienced CMs around to help them out. That’s unfair to CPs and Guests.

Then it’s really bad if you add one or two know-it-all takeover CPs who extended their programs and order the newbies around, even though nobody is following proper SOP.

My sources: years of CP friends and my own experiences as an office-dwelling CM, although I never did the program.

The point is that Disney relies on CPs as low-cost labor, Disney lays off experienced CMs and behind-the-scenes white collar pros, and the Guests pay for those decisions.
 

BigThunderMatt

Well-Known Member
It's probably easy to sit behind a keyboard and type this, but many on this board, including myself are in management. We work 50 hour weeks fora "40 hour" salary, and many days are asked to do more. We are out there every day trying our best to keep thousands of Cast Members smiling and happy amid long hours and low pay. We try in earnest to let our ideas be heard by the higher ups, to change the parks and resorts for the better for our Guests. Many of us pour our hearts and souls into this job, eat, live, and breathe WDW.

And the reward for all of this? Every single year being fearful that I will show up the next day and have to come home and tell my family that I no longer will be able to provide for them. I don't fault you for saying what you did, and you probably weren't referring to management at my level, but it still hurts to read.
I feel you and I'm glad I escaped that culture because it was not worth it. I don't know what LOB you work in but in Operations what got to me the most was the cutthroat nature of it all. The inability to have any degree of agency, the micromanagement, the constant need to innovate and improve and stand out from your peers who are all doing the exact same things and many of whom would just as quickly throw you under the bus if it meant securing advancement in their careers.

Disney does very little right by their employees and how they vet, hire, and retain management is one of the absolute worst aspects of that company. I still suffer PTSD from those days even though I'm in a much better position in both my work and personal life now.
 

tirian

Well-Known Member
It's probably easy to sit behind a keyboard and type this, but many on this board, including myself are in management. We work 50 hour weeks fora "40 hour" salary, and many days are asked to do more. We are out there every day trying our best to keep thousands of Cast Members smiling and happy amid long hours and low pay. We try in earnest to let our ideas be heard by the higher ups, to change the parks and resorts for the better for our Guests. Many of us pour our hearts and souls into this job, eat, live, and breathe WDW.

And the reward for all of this? Every single year being fearful that I will show up the next day and have to come home and tell my family that I no longer will be able to provide for them. I don't fault you for saying what you did, and you probably weren't referring to management at my level, but it still hurts to read.
I feel you and I'm glad I escaped that culture because it was not worth it. I don't know what LOB you work in but in Operations what got to me the most was the cutthroat nature of it all. The inability to have any degree of agency, the micromanagement, the constant need to innovate and improve and stand out from your peers who are all doing the exact same things and many of whom would just as quickly throw you under the bus if it meant securing advancement in their careers.

Disney does very little right by their employees and how they vet, hire, and retain management is one of the absolute worst aspects of that company. I still suffer PTSD from those days even though I'm in a much better position in both my work and personal life now.

^^ that’s why I left
 

tirian

Well-Known Member
It's probably easy to sit behind a keyboard and type this, but many on this board, including myself are in management. We work 50 hour weeks fora "40 hour" salary, and many days are asked to do more. We are out there every day trying our best to keep thousands of Cast Members smiling and happy amid long hours and low pay. We try in earnest to let our ideas be heard by the higher ups, to change the parks and resorts for the better for our Guests. Many of us pour our hearts and souls into this job, eat, live, and breathe WDW.

And the reward for all of this? Every single year being fearful that I will show up the next day and have to come home and tell my family that I no longer will be able to provide for them. I don't fault you for saying what you did, and you probably weren't referring to management at my level, but it still hurts to read.
From what I saw over the years, front-line managers worked extremely hard to maintain the “Walt” magic that the company’s own execs neither understood nor supported.

I applaud your efforts.
 
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