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KODAK Wanting Out of Imagination?

TheBeatles

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
I know this rumour has popped up before, but it's back.

According to a friend who works at Journey, Kodak wants to end its sponsorship before Captain EO starts and managers from the attraction aren't forthcoming with exact details of what is going on.

Thoughts?
 

Evil Genius

Well-Known Member
I think Kodak checked out mentally from caring about the pavillion years ago so I think it's time for a transition to something new. Someone who cares to put the "imagination" back into the place!
 

bgraham34

Well-Known Member
I think Kodak checked out mentally from caring about the pavillion years ago so I think it's time for a transition to something new. Someone who cares to put the "imagination" back into the place!

I have to agree with that. Its a shame that pavilion is not a speck of its former self.
 

TubaGeek

God bless the "Ignore" button.
Just so long as they never show the HISKA pre-show EVER again.
That's the single worst thing on Disney property.
 

devoy1701

Well-Known Member
I don't know if many of you have noticed...but when we loose sponsors, we haven't been so quick to get replacements in. So while the "let's get someone in there who will care about Imagination" is optimistic, I think it's a far cry from what will actually happen.
 

DisneyMusician2

Well-Known Member
KODAK and Disney combined have let the pavilion go to heck, and wouldn't want my name associated with one of the most maligned attractions on property either.

I wouldn't chase them off so fast, however, as I don't know how easy it is going to be to get another sponsor in there right now.
 

Master Yoda

Pro Star Wars geek.
Premium Member
I don't know if many of you have noticed...but when we loose sponsors, we haven't been so quick to get replacements in. So while the "let's get someone in there who will care about Imagination" is optimistic, I think it's a far cry from what will actually happen.
You speak the truth.

This is much better than......

disney2_246_journey_into_imagination.jpg


the alternative.

2900851604_d16703fa02.jpg
 

magicmaya

Active Member
Ooooooo crayola might be a good sponsor. They're full of imagination! And they would make everything so colorful! :D:lookaroun
 

JohnLocke

Member
Just wondering, was it Kodak that forced Disney to change the Imagination Ride, or did Disney do it to try to appease Kodak for another reason?
 

po1998

Well-Known Member
Anyone have an idea of what these sponsorships cost the companies? In addition, is it a one time upfront fee, a yearly fee or a combination of both?

Thx.
 

fosse76

Well-Known Member
I don't know if many of you have noticed...but when we loose sponsors, we haven't been so quick to get replacements in. So while the "let's get someone in there who will care about Imagination" is optimistic, I think it's a far cry from what will actually happen.

Though it tried to be, it is NOT a World's Fair. These companies end up paying for the development and operation of these sponsored attractions, yet reap no real financial benefit, while Disney makes millions off them through admission and, in some cases, merchandise. I think many of the reasons Disney is so much more focused on nickel-and-dimeing us is because with these lost sponsors, they are really seeing how much it costs to operate their parks.
 

trr1

Well-Known Member
Anyone have an idea of what these sponsorships cost the companies? In addition, is it a one time upfront fee, a yearly fee or a combination of both?

Thx.
well
GM paid Disney $100 million for the sponsorship, according to a person familiar with the contract. The deal was front-loaded: GM paid nearly all of its sponsorship fees during the first five years of the 10-year pact, said the person, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak on behalf of either company.
GM also spends between $1 million and $2 million a year operating a post-ride showroom inside the attraction, with more than a dozen vehicles on display and terminals that guests can use to order sales brochures.
 
I know a lot of folks either love or hate them, without a lot of in between...but I think Apple would be a GREAT sponsor for this pavilion...

They are actually one of the few companies out there that actually "imagines" and "creates" new and exciting ideas/products...plus I think the use of technology relates really well when discussing the themes of the original JI...

*ducks* :D
 

trr1

Well-Known Member
Just wondering, was it Kodak that forced Disney to change the Imagination Ride, or did Disney do it to try to appease Kodak for another reason?

In 1997, Fujifilm, (Kodak's biggest rival at the time) came to Disney with an offer: make Journey into Imagination into a thrill ride that had nothing to do with imagination. Kodak's sponsorship contract was almost up, and Fujifilm knew that when the contract ran out, Disney would need someone to sponsor the building. Kodak, however, wished to stay with Disney and continue the contract. Kodak realized that in order to compete with Fujifilm, they too must come up with a new attraction to go into the building. Their proposal was to make Journey Into Imagination, already an E-Ticket attraction, into something more scientific. The ride would also be shorter and have cheaper special effects. At the time, Journey Into Imagination was the most expensive ride in Epcot to keep running, despite the fact that it got more visitors in a day than Epcot's flagship ride Spaceship Earth. The guests made it all worthwhile for Disney to keep it running, but Disney still wasn't satisfied with it. It was the most technologically advanced dark ride in history. A roller coaster would mean much more money to build and keep running, and they feared it wouldn't be nearly as popular as Journey Into Imagination. Therefore, by the end of 1997, Disney accepted Kodak's idea.
you can read about this here
 

WDWFigment

Well-Known Member
Though it tried to be, it is NOT a World's Fair. These companies end up paying for the development and operation of these sponsored attractions, yet reap no real financial benefit, while Disney makes millions off them through admission and, in some cases, merchandise. I think many of the reasons Disney is so much more focused on nickel-and-dimeing us is because with these lost sponsors, they are really seeing how much it costs to operate their parks.

They get mass-exposure advertising. While that may not entail a direct profit, it is beneficial. That company's name is in guest's mind when, consciously or subconsciously, when it comes time to make a purchase of a particular product. My guess would be that Disney values the pavilion sponsorships much higher than most companies, otherwise we would not be seeing such a mass exodus of sponsors.

One would think that Disney would respond by adjusting downward its internal valuation of the sponsorships on the theory that "something is better than nothing." Of course, maybe Disney believes that once the contract drops below a certain price, it's better to go sans-sponsor, as there is a cheapening effect that occurs because of the sponsor. I really don't know.

In sum, the sponsorships do have value, and there is no doubt that there would be an ample number of suitors at the right price.
 

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