Is attendance really down at WDW this or…

fairy8i8

New Member
I mean, I study these lines for a living. My default assumption is that they're wrong because there's no revenue for Disney to gain by increasing the accuracy of posted wait times.

I don't think the reason is "Guests are happy when a posted wait of X ends up being Y."

That policy prevents guests from exercising their own judgement to decide the best use of their time. It's an incredibly patronizing example of "we know what's best for you so don't ask questions."

Here's an example from Slinky Dog last week.

As the day drew to a close, Slinky Dog's posted wait was 70 minutes at 8:15 pm. It had been at 70 minutes for about half an hour.

Twenty-two minutes later we timed an actual wait of 13 minutes. And we got actuals of 10 and 14 in rapid succession within a few minutes of that.

It's almost impossible to get a 57-minute reduction in actual waits in just 22 minutes of clock time. I'm sure I could come up with a scenario where literally nobody got in line, wheelchairs caused an extended delay, extra trains were added to the track, etc. But that almost certainly didn't happen here, and I think we all know that.

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To spell out the problem with "Posted of X ends up being Y", where Y < X, there are tons of people who would've got in a 10- to 20-minute line at Slinky, if they had been given accurate information about their wait. But they skipped riding because they didn't think it was worth 70 minutes. So they missed out on an enjoyable experience because of bad information.

Sorry for the long post. What do you think the reason is?
I think the posted waits are for DAS users. Anything 10 minutes or less is instant ride. Otherwise, they get the posted wait minus 10 minutes through the LL. They use the posted waits as DAS traffic control. Can imagine what the LL would look like if they posted a 10 minute wait and everyone on DAS could ride instantly? It definitely would become a 70 minute wait for standby very quickly. Also, LL would fill up, and both DAS and LL users would complain about how LL were way too long and either not worth the money or don't meet their needs for shorter waits. Instead, Disney can delay DAS users from coming over for an hour and give standby guests a pleasant experience and DAS guests a good experience because fewer will book a 70 minute wait when they first get in the park. It's a win-win. Shorter waits for everyone.

Also, I have been learning about VIP tours, and many people in the groups suggest letting your tour guide optimize your day for you because they are the experts and have phones with access to all sorts of info. Really, I think it's another case of coordinating with other VIP groups (50-100 on any given day, 150 on busy days). It seems they almost all want to do the headliners in each park. However, it wouldn't feel like much of a VIP experience if you were in a 30+ minute LL line with 20 other VIP groups. Yes, it's optimized, but not necessarily just in the interest of your personal desires. Really, I go with a touringplan and rope drop on a low to moderate day, and I can do WAY MORE rides than 17 in 7 hours, which is what I am seeing most frequently. I've seen people say they are doing a crazy number of steps too, even though they get driven around backstage in a van. I'd be interested to see what an optimized 4 park headliner itinerary would actually look like, and it wouldn't surprise me if it could be quite close in terms of steps and waiting if you took Minivans between parks and did G+ and ILL as well as rope dropping early entry.
 

C33Mom

Well-Known Member
5:30pm on a Saturday and 7 Dwarfs & Peter Pan are under an hour at 55 and 45 minutes respectively. Pirates showing 5 minutes. Space Mountain 20. Over at DHS Runaway Railway is showing 30 minutes and Slinky Dog is 45. As long as you can deal with recording breaking heat and upcoming tropical downpours it seems like it's a great time to go to the parks.
With my luck, people are going to start sharing this news (spun as both “short waits” and “Disney is dying as evidenced by 45m wait for Slinky”) and then by the time we make it out this summer everybody is going to have booked impromptu trips to beat the crowds.

It’s impossible to know how much of the decrease in wait times may be due to the DAS crackdown. It’s one thing to virtually wait for Slinky Dog and 7DMT for 90m while you enjoy a table service meal and a people eater attraction, it’s entirely another to convince frequent visitors that they are worth standing in line over an hour to ride in miserable weather.
 

el_super

Well-Known Member
With my luck, people are going to start sharing this news (spun as both “short waits” and “Disney is dying as evidenced by 45m wait for Slinky”) and then by the time we make it out this summer everybody is going to have booked impromptu trips to beat the crowds.

Yeah... that's what I'm thinking too. I'd love to go if it wasn't crowded but ... so would everyone else.
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
With my luck, people are going to start sharing this news (spun as both “short waits” and “Disney is dying as evidenced by 45m wait for Slinky”) and then by the time we make it out this summer everybody is going to have booked impromptu trips to beat the crowds.

It’s impossible to know how much of the decrease in wait times may be due to the DAS crackdown. It’s one thing to virtually wait for Slinky Dog and 7DMT for 90m while you enjoy a table service meal and a people eater attraction, it’s entirely another to convince frequent visitors that they are worth standing in line over an hour to ride in miserable weather.

Yeah... that's what I'm thinking too. I'd love to go if it wasn't crowded but ... so would everyone else.

That’s not a thing anymore

The problem with making it $10,000 for a 7 day trip is the majority of Disneys market can’t afford that anymore.

Cause Bob
 

davis_unoxx

Well-Known Member
TOT currently a walk, and plenty of other low wait times….

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C33Mom

Well-Known Member
I think they should move the parks to Alaska.
Honestly surprised that more flyover state governors aren’t trying to make a play for theme park business (especially if you don’t need outdoor attractions—Disney has plenty of coasters)— centrally located, would be good for jobs and infrastructure, and it’s not like many of us make it outside the WDW bubble anyway.
 

stepjune28

New Member
Nobody knows that when they booked…

…they just never bothered to want to book

Everybody does know that the month of June is hot in Florida and they choose not to book their trips during the hot months.

I think heat is a legit reason for the low crowds at WDW during the summer in recent years. I go to California if I want to do Disney between May-September.
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
Summers were lower than expected crowds for a few years before the pandemic based on some sites I read earlier tonight. They were down last summer too. People just aren't wanting to go in the summer, agreed
The calendar has been shifting for along time

That doesn’t cover ghost towns in the summer

Still much easier to travel with no school
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
Everybody does know that the month of June is hot in Florida and they choose not to book their trips during the hot months.

I think heat is a legit reason for the low crowds at WDW during the summer in recent years. I go to California if I want to do Disney between May-September.
You’re both over and under thinking it.

It’s always been hotter in Florida…and it’s hot everywhere now
 

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