• Welcome to the WDWMAGIC.COM Forums!
    Please take a look around, and feel free to sign up and join the community.You can use your Twitter or Facebook account to sign up, or register directly.

Interview with Bob Iger about the Parks

RSoxNo1

Well-Known Member
Advertisement
The banshees in the Flight of Passage gift shop have had unforeseen success. Do you think people are shelling out $50 for a puppet toy based off of a recollection of, much less sentiment for, the banshees in the decade-old film? No. It is almost entirely the well-crafted attraction that sells you on a previously unfamiliar character. Flight of Passage is a perfect example of a theme park attraction succeeding as an independent medium of storytelling. It’s hard to fathom that Bob doesn’t understand this. How can one legitimately attribute a ten year old’s GSATs/purchases to a PG-13 film that came and left ten years ago?

Imagineering could create more of these successes if they were given the creative freedom to do so, as they were in the past. The mandated inclusion of IP is often hindering.
The banshees were successful for the first summer, but they've also appeared at the outlets as well.

Merchandise is a component of this, but the IP push is primarily about year 1 marketing. It's incredibly short sighted when the attraction(s) don't otherwise make sense for the area that they're going into. Building a ride for the year 1 marketing as opposed to it's 20+ year lifespan is downright dumb.
 

epcotWSC

Well-Known Member
The banshees were successful for the first summer, but they've also appeared at the outlets as well.

Merchandise is a component of this, but the IP push is primarily about year 1 marketing. It's incredibly short sighted when the attraction(s) don't otherwise make sense for the area that they're going into. Building a ride for the year 1 marketing as opposed to it's 20+ year lifespan is downright dumb.
Pandora was actually a fairly smart IP placement. James Cameron is planning on releasing another 4 Avatar movies over the next 5 years (which I believe at least 2 & 3 have completed filming and 4 & 5 are in progress). If they end up being hits, the place is going to be even worse than it already is and merchandising is going to be even more lucrative. Of course if they flop, that could absolutely hurt the WoP.
 

RSoxNo1

Well-Known Member
Pandora was actually a fairly smart IP placement. James Cameron is planning on releasing another 4 Avatar movies over the next 5 years (which I believe at least 2 & 3 have completed filming and 4 & 5 are in progress). If they end up being hits, the place is going to be even worse than it already is and merchandising is going to be even more lucrative.
Pandora was highly questioned by the fan community, especially it's placement and scope in the Animal Kingdom. With that said, I think they did an exceptional job with it, especially from a story treatment standpoint. It's a great fit for the Animal Kingdom.

Having said that, it's not a property that will sell a lot of merchandise. If anything, I think they would have been better off with the minimalist Toy Story Land merch approach (although Toy Story probably should have had the larger gift shop).
 

epcotWSC

Well-Known Member
Pandora was highly questioned by the fan community, especially it's placement and scope in the Animal Kingdom. With that said, I think they did an exceptional job with it, especially from a story treatment standpoint. It's a great fit for the Animal Kingdom.

Having said that, it's not a property that will sell a lot of merchandise. If anything, I think they would have been better off with the minimalist Toy Story Land merch approach (although Toy Story probably should have had the larger gift shop).
That's the thing about Pandora, it's not really a cultural phenomenon (like Star Wars) and it's not Disney. I can't remember anyone in the parks sporting an Avatar shirt, for example. I've seen tons of Toy Story, Star Wars, etc. The big test for Pandora will be Avatar 2-5. If they really blow people away, the opportunity is there.
 

Kman101

Well-Known Member
The banshees were successful for the first summer, but they've also appeared at the outlets as well.

Merchandise is a component of this, but the IP push is primarily about year 1 marketing. It's incredibly short sighted when the attraction(s) don't otherwise make sense for the area that they're going into. Building a ride for the year 1 marketing as opposed to it's 20+ year lifespan is downright dumb.
And there's no longer a queue for the banshees, I believe, you can just walk up and get one. I guess the "experience" of it is gone, but I haven't been in there to verify. (And also to be fair, most of the merchandise is ungodly expensive, shirts are going for 35 dollars ... I think that has a lot to do with lack of merch sales for a lot of things ... but people have shown they'll buy in droves the latest wacky colored bedazzled thing)

It's absolutely about marketing and many of us have said they only think short-term, not long-term, and it shows.
 

ChrisFL

Well-Known Member
Nostalgia for the past is a wonderful thing, and commonly associated with older people. Yes, the ride was state-of-the-art in 1989 but 25 years later none of those things represented any sort of brilliance. Disney parks are not museums. What replaced it is the same ride system (so you still get your backwards waterfall) married to state-of-the-art technology and a story literally billions of people now know....

I liked Maelstrom but mostly for the reasons you site: memories of that first time on it. The replacement is vastly more entertaining for the vast majority of people, myself included.
Oh I'm not saying it had staying power, but for the time it was nice.
 

doctornick

Well-Known Member
If you want to argue that, you could say the the RnRC is based on an existing IP in Aerosmith. And don't worry guys, if Iger cant change them into an attraction based on an IP, he will surely turn the name of the attraction into a movie franchise.
Of course RNR is an IP ride. If Disney didn't want an IP, they could have created a fictional band and done the same concept. But they used Aerosmith in order to have something familiar and popular with folks.
 

RandySavage

Well-Known Member
Nostalgia for the past is a wonderful thing, and commonly associated with older people. Yes, the ride was state-of-the-art in 1989 but 25 years later none of those things represented any sort of brilliance. Disney parks are not museums. What replaced it is the same ride system (so you still get your backwards waterfall) married to state-of-the-art technology and a story literally billions of people now know....

I liked Maelstrom but mostly for the reasons you site: memories of that first time on it. The replacement is vastly more entertaining for the vast majority of people, myself included.
No one can tell me that that nails-on-chalkboard opening jabber by "Frozen Oaken" is better than the ominous and awesome former introduction, "You are not the first to pass this way... nor shall you be the last!" We all know why FEA is a major success, popularity-wise. FEA's superiority as an attraction over Maelstrom is much more debatable, especially in its context.
 
Last edited:

tigerlight

Well-Known Member
No one can tell me that that nails-on-chalkboard opening jabber by "Frozen Oaken" is better than the ominous and awesome former introduction, "You are not the first to pass this way... nor shall you be the last!" We all know why FEA is a major success, popularity-wise. FEA's superiority as an attraction over Maelstrom is much more debatable, especially in its context.
Again, if you poll an audience under the age of 45 who have ridden both rides, I'm confident 95% of them would strongly prefer FEA. I find the snowman more than charming, and really enjoy the beginning sequence... It's a question of futurists vs. traditionalists... liking/accepting change vs. hating change.
 
Top Bottom